Aldric of Le Mans

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Saint Aldric
Born c. 800
Died 7 January 856(856-01-07).
Le Mans
Venerated in Roman Catholicism

Saint Aldric (c. 800 – 7 January 856) was Bishop of Le Mans in the time of Louis the Pious.

As a youth Aldric lived in the court of Charlemagne, at Aix la Chapelle, as well as in that of Charlemagne's son and successor Louis. Aldric was highly esteemed by both monarchs, but at the age of twenty-one he withdrew to Metz and became a priest. He was then recalled to the court by Louis, who took him as the guide of his conscience.

Nine years after his ordination, Aldric was made Bishop of Le Mans. Apart from being conspicuously virtuous, he showed a practical turn in building aqueducts and ransoming captives, as well as building new churches and restoring monasteries.

In the civil wars which followed the death of Louis, Aldric's loyalty to Charles the Bald resulted in his expulsion from his see, and he withdrew to Rome. Gregory IV reinstated him. As an emissary of the Council of Aix la Chapelle Aldric visited Pepin I, who was then King of Aquitaine, with Erchenrad, Bishop of Paris, and persuaded Pepin to order that all the possessions of the Church which had been seized by his followers should be restored.

Aldric's episcopate lasted for twenty-four years, and during his lifetime he took part in the Councils of Paris and Tours. He died at Le Mans on 7 January 856 and was succeeded by Robert.

Relevant works[edit]

  • Actus Pontificum Cenomannis (in urbe degentium), compiled during Aldric's episcopate.
    • ed. Margarete Weidemann, Geschichte des Bistums Le Mans von der Spätantike bis zur Karolingerzeit: Actus Pontificum Cenomannis in urbe degentium und Gesta Aldrici. 3 vols. Mainz, 2000.
  • Gesta (Domni) Aldrici, which relates how Aldric translated the bodies of the saints and former bishops of Le Mans: Julianus, Turibius, Pavatius, Romanus, Liborius and Hadoindus to his cathedral.
    • ed. Margarete Weidemann, Geschichte des Bistums Le Mans von der Spätantike bis zur Karolingerzeit: Actus Pontificum Cenomannis in urbe degentium und Gesta Aldrici. 3 vols. Mainz, 2000.
    • ed. Migne, Patrologa Latina 115. Html transcript, Documenta Catholica Omnia.

Further reading[edit]

  • Goffart, Walter A. The Le Mans forgeries: a chapter from the history of church property in the ninth century. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard UP, 1966. Contents.

 This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domainHerbermann, Charles, ed. (1913). "article name needed". Catholic Encyclopedia. New York: Robert Appleton.