Aldrington railway station

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Aldrington National Rail
Aldrington
Westward view from the eastbound platform at Aldrington
Location
Place Hove
Local authority Brighton & Hove
Grid reference TQ281056
Operations
Station code AGT
Managed by Southern
Number of platforms 2
Live arrivals/departures and station information
from National Rail Enquiries
Annual rail passenger usage*
2004/05  0.106 million
2005/06 Increase 0.118 million
2006/07 Increase 0.129 million
2007/08 Increase 0.149 million
2008/09 Increase 0.151 million
2009/10 Increase 0.158 million
2010/11 Increase 0.169 million
2011/12 Increase 0.192 million
2012/13 Increase 0.214 million
History
3 September 1905 opened as Dyke Jn Halt
17 June 1932 renamed Aldrington Halt
National RailUK railway stations
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
* Annual estimated passenger usage based on sales of tickets in stated financial year(s) which end or originate at Aldrington from Office of Rail Regulation statistics. Methodology may vary year on year.
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Aldrington railway station, sometimes known by its former names of Aldrington Halt and Dyke Junction, is a railway station in Hove, in East Sussex, England. The station is 2 miles (3 km) west of Brighton on the West Coastway Line.

Opened in 1905 by the London, Brighton and South Coast Railway as Dyke Junction Halt, with wooden platforms, it was renamed Aldrington in 1932 and rebuilt in concrete by the Southern Railway. It is situated just east of the former junction with the branch line to Devil's Dyke, which opened in 1887 and closed in 1938; the layout and curvature of certain roads and buildings immediately north-west of the station indicates where the branch ran.

The station was staffed during peak hours until approximately 1990, after which the hut which served as a ticket office was demolished. As of 2009, the old concrete shelters have been replaced with reinforced plastic shelters which are now the only features on the platforms. Ramps lead down to street level.

There are ticket-issuing machines at the entrances to each platform.Pre-purchased tickets can also be collected on these machines. There is no footbridge connecting the platforms with each other. However there is a tunnel under the railway lines at the western end of the platforms which was originally built to allow the local farmer to move his cattle between fields which became separated with the arrival of the railway.

History[edit]

Opened by the London, Brighton and South Coast Railway, it became part of the Southern Railway during the Grouping of 1923. The line then passed on to the Southern Region of British Railways on nationalisation in 1948.

When Sectorisation was introduced, the station was served by Network South East until the Privatisation of British Railways.

Services[edit]

As of 2008, the standard off-peak train service is:

Preceding station National Rail National Rail Following station
Hove   Southern
West Coastway Line
  Portslade
Disused railways
Hove   Brighton and Dyke Railway
(1887-1939)
  Rowan Halt

References[edit]

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 50°50′11″N 0°10′54″W / 50.83639°N 0.18167°W / 50.83639; -0.18167