Aleksander Klumberg

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Aleksander Klumberg
Aleksander Klumberg.jpeg
Personal information
Born (1899-04-17)17 April 1899
Died 10 February 1958(1958-02-10) (aged 58)
Height 174 cm (5 ft 9 in)
Weight 74 kg (163 lb)
Sport
Sport Athletics
Event(s) Decathlon
Club Kalev Tallinn
Achievements and titles
Personal best(s) Dec – 6087 (1922)
JT – 63.60 m (1935)
DT – 42.38 m (1922)
SP – 13.63 m (1922)
LJ – 7.20 m (1923)
TJ – 14.33 m (1924)
HJ – 1.83 m
PV – 3:50 m
100 m – 11.6
400 m – 54.4
1500 m – 4:44.3
110 mH – 16.4[1][2][3]

Aleksander Klumberg (since 1936 Kolmpere; 17 April 1899 – 10 February 1958) was an Estonian decathlete. He competed in several events at the 1920 and 1924 Olympics and won a bronze medal in the decathlon in 1924.[1] In 1922 he became the first official world record holder in the decathlon, albeit with a performance inferior to the Stockholm 1912 series of Jim Thorpe.[3]

Klumberg took up athletics around 1912, and in 1915–17 held Russian records in several jumping and throwing events. Besides athletics he won three Estonian titles in bandy. In 1918–19 he fought in the Estonian War of Independence as a volunteer, and after that worked as a physical education instructor with the Estonian army (1919–20), military schools (1924–26) and police schools (1927 and 1942–44). He also trained the national athletics teams of Poland (1927–32) and Estonia, and in this capacity attended the 1928, 1932 and 1936 Olympics. He was arrested by NKVD in 1944 and kept in a prison camp in the Soviet Far East until 1956.[3] He is buried at the Rahumäe cemetery in Tallinn.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Aleksander Klumberg. sports-reference.com
  2. ^ Aleksander Klumberg. trackfield.brinkster.net
  3. ^ a b c Klumberg, Aleksander. Eesti spordi biograafiline leksikon
  4. ^ "Cemetery Portal". Archived from the original on 12 February 2010. Retrieved 24 February 2010. 
Records
Preceded by
First recognised holder
Men's Decathlon World Record Holder
5 July 1920 – 12 July 1924
Succeeded by
United States Harold Osborn