Aleta Arthur Trauger

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Aleta Arthur Trauger
Judge of the United States District Court for the Middle District of Tennessee
Assumed office
October 22, 1998
Appointed by Bill Clinton
Preceded by John Trice Nixon
Personal details
Born 1945 (age 71–72)
Denver, Colorado
Education Cornell College B.A.
Vanderbilt University M.A.T.
Vanderbilt University Law School J.D.

Aleta Arthur Trauger (born 1945) is a United States District Judge of the United States District Court for the Middle District of Tennessee.

Education and career[edit]

Born in Denver, Colorado, Trauger received a Bachelor of Arts degree from Cornell College in 1968, a Master of Arts in Teaching from Vanderbilt University in 1972, and a Juris Doctor from Vanderbilt University Law School in 1976. She was a clerk and associate in private practice in Tennessee from 1974 to 1977. She was an Assistant United States Attorney in the Middle District of Tennessee from 1977 to 1979 and from 1980 to 1982, serving in the Northern District of Illinois from 1979 to 1980. She was in private practice from 1983 to 1984, and was legal counsel to the College of Charleston from 1984 to 1985, returning to private practice from 1985 to 1991. She was a Chief of staff, Office of the Mayor, Nashville, Tennessee from 1991 to 1992. From 1993 to 1998, she was a United States Bankruptcy Judge for the Middle District of Tennessee.

Federal judicial service[edit]

On September 22, 1998, President Bill Clinton nominated Trauger to a seat on the United States District Court for the Middle District of Tennessee vacated by John Trice Nixon. She was confirmed by the United States Senate on October 21, 1998, and received her commission on October 22, 1998.

Notable case[edit]

On March 14, 2014, Judge Trauger issued a preliminary injunction ordering Tennessee to recognize the marriages of three same-sex couples consummated out-of-state. In her ruling, Judge Trauger did not directly hold Tennessee's ban unconstitutional, but stated that, "At some point in the future, likely with the benefit of additional precedent from circuit courts and, perhaps, the Supreme Court, the court will be asked to make a final ruling on the plaintiffs’ claims. At this point, all signs indicate that, in the eyes of the United States Constitution, the plaintiffs’ marriages will be placed on an equal footing with those of heterosexual couples and that proscriptions against same-sex marriage will soon become a footnote in the annals of American history".[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Jonsson, Patrik (15 March 2014). "Judge calls Tenn. gay marriage ban historical 'footnote': Do Southerners now agree? (+video)" – via Christian Science Monitor. 

Sources[edit]

Legal offices
Preceded by
John Trice Nixon
Judge of the United States District Court for the Middle District of Tennessee
1998–present
Incumbent