Aleutia

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Aleutia Computers Ltd.
Privately held, for-profit company
Industry Computer hardware
Founded October 2006 (2006-10)
Founder Michael Rosenberg, Founder
Headquarters London, UK
Number of locations
1[1]
Area served
Products in 64+ countries[2]
Products desktop computers, thin clients, nettops, workstations, embedded systems, set-top boxes, servers, computer monitors, and solar panels[2]
Services eClinic software as a service[3]
Number of employees
4+[4]
Website aleutia.com
The Aleutia T1 desktop.

Aleutia Computers Ltd.[5] (pronounced al-oo-sha[2]) is a privately owned computer manufacturer based in London, United Kingdom. Its product range consists of low-power desktop and server computers. Its products are used in the developing world and as original base designs for externally branded products.[2] Its computers have been purchased by Unicef, Tesco, Schlumberger, Pret a Manger, Virgin Media, and the National Health Service.[2] All computers come with the option to ship a version of Ubuntu or Linux Mint, alongside the mainstream choice of Microsoft Windows.[6]

History[edit]

Aleutia was founded in London by Michael Rosenberg in October 2006,[7] motivated by the unreliability, inefficiency, and expense of the Hewlett-Packard PCs in the internet cafe he had set up in Takoradi, Ghana in the summer of 2006.[8][9]

Its first product was the E1, which was introduced for public sale in October 2007, was a fanless, low-power computer targeting the need for energy efficient computers in Africa.[10]

Most of the company's employees as shown on the website are now either retired or working elsewhere. The company stopped responding to telephone calls and emails in early 2018 and has effectively ceased trading.

Products[edit]

T series[edit]

The T series of Atom-based nettop PCs is the longest-running and most popular. It comprises the T1 and the All-in-One, and the discontinued T1-R and T2.

D series[edit]

The discontinued D series of desktop PCs are more powerful than the T series. It comprises the D1, D2, and D3.

Product list[edit]

Product name Description Introduced Discontinued
T1 / Tango 1[11] An Atom-based Mini-ITX computer that is aimed at nettop and thin-client use by both individuals and businesses. ? no
All In One The T1 with an integrated 21.5-inch LED display.[6] 2013 no
R50 Server in a "sealed chassis".[6] 2013 no
T1-R Similar to the T1, but "ruggedized".[12] >=2010 2013
T2 / Tango 2[11] Similar to the T1, but with a dual-core Atom processor and a larger case to accommodate the larger heatsink. ? Before 2013-03-14
H1 A product was introduced in 2006 with this name as "a handheld, low-powered, extremely affordable linux-based computer";[13] it was discontinued around 2007. Another product, the "H1 Hotel PC", was introduced in 2010.[14] 2010 Before 2013-03-14
H3 VESA-mountable high-performance thin client.[15] 2008-2010 Before 2013-03-14
E1 A desktop "designed for Rural Africa".[16] 2006/7 2007/8
E2 VESA-mountable mini computer.[17] 2007/8 2010/11
D1 / Delta 1[11] Silent desktop office PC.[18] 2008-2010 Before 2013-03-14
D2 / Delta 2[11] "Designed for power users".[18][19] 2010 Before 2013-03-14
D3 / Delta 3 Dual/quad-core mini desktop.[11] 2010/11 Before 2013-03-14
P1 "Perfect as server or for Boats."[20] 2008-10 2010/11
X1 Low-power server.[12] >=2010 2013
Relia Industrial media PC.[12] >=2011 2013
M1 Industrial server.[12] >=2010 2013
Solar Classroom In A Box All the IT equipment required for a solar-powered rural classroom.[12] >=2011 2013
12V Monitor 11-watt 20-inch LED display.[21] 2010/11 Before 2013-03-14
M200 Industrial server. Fanless 2U rack mount, no moving parts, waterproof and with solid-state drives. 2014 No

Clients[edit]

Aleutia supplies the T1 computers used as point-of-sale servers in every Pret a Manger store in the United Kingdom, United States and Hong Kong running Omnico Hospitality software.[22]

A project being run by the Uganda Communications Commission to provide ICT to all Ugandan schools has chosen the T1 over the Asus Eee due to the T1's fan-less design.[23]

The Ethiopia ConnectED project aimed to "build a solar-powered computer learning center that integrated the technology, theories of change, and pedagogical practices from the Hole-in-the-Wall, Education for All, and One Laptop Per Child initiatives."[24] Aleutia supplied T1 PCs running Edubuntu, along with LED monitors, and solar kits.[25]

Aleutia supplies the hardware and "eClinic" software used on the ground by the "Access to Basic Care" (ABC) programme, which runs 12 healthcare clinics in Oyo State, Nigeria.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Contact". Aleutia. Archived from the original on 12 November 2013. Retrieved 13 November 2013. 
  2. ^ a b c d e "About Us". Aleutia. Retrieved 12 November 2013. 
  3. ^ a b "Enabling Free Healthcare in Rural Clinics". Aleutia. Archived from the original on 12 November 2013. Retrieved 12 November 2013. 
  4. ^ "The Team". Aleutia. Retrieved 13 November 2013. 
  5. ^ "WebCHeck". Retrieved 13 November 2013. 
  6. ^ a b c "Products". Aleutia. Retrieved 13 November 2013. 
  7. ^ "Overview". Aleutia. Archived from the original on 27 December 2011. Retrieved 19 December 2011. 
  8. ^ "About Us". Archived from the original on 26 July 2010. Retrieved 2013-11-12. 
  9. ^ "About Us". Archived from the original on 20 April 2013. Retrieved 2013-11-12. 
  10. ^ "Aleutia E1". ZDNet. Archived from the original on 23 February 2012. Retrieved 19 December 2011. 
  11. ^ a b c d e "Products". Archived from the original on 7 July 2011. Retrieved 2013-11-13. 
  12. ^ a b c d e "All products". Archived from the original on 14 March 2013. Retrieved 2013-11-13. 
  13. ^ "Products". Archived from the original on 21 December 2006. Retrieved 2013-11-13. 
  14. ^ "H1 Hotel PC". Archived from the original on 10 August 2010. Retrieved 2010-04-15. 
  15. ^ "H3 VESA PC". Archived from the original on 10 August 2010. Retrieved 2013-11-13. 
  16. ^ "Products". Archived from the original on 15 December 2007. Retrieved 2013-11-13. 
  17. ^ "Products". Archived from the original on 17 December 2008. Retrieved 2013-11-13. 
  18. ^ a b "Products". Archived from the original on 10 August 2010. Retrieved 2013-11-13. 
  19. ^ "D1 Mini Atom PC". Archived from the original on 10 August 2010. Retrieved 2013-11-13. 
  20. ^ "Products". Archived from the original on 23 July 2010. Retrieved 2013-11-13. 
  21. ^ "12V Monitor". Archived from the original on 28 September 2011. Retrieved 2013-11-13. 
  22. ^ "Pret Point Of Sale servers worldwide". Aleutia. Archived from the original on 13 November 2013. Retrieved 13 November 2013. 
  23. ^ "Solar ICT Classrooms at 113 Rural Uganda Schools". Aleutia. Archived from the original on 13 November 2013. Retrieved 13 November 2013. 
  24. ^ Jason R.Atwood, USA; Davis Projects for Peace. "Ethiopia ConnectED". Retrieved 13 November 2013. 
  25. ^ "Solar Computers in Rural Ethiopia Used by 700 Students". Aleutia. Archived from the original on 13 November 2013. Retrieved 13 November 2013. 

External links[edit]