Alex Barros

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Alexandre Barros
Barros Jerez2004.jpg
Barros aboard the Honda RC211V in Jerez 2004
Nationality Brazilian
Born (1970-10-18) October 18, 1970 (age 47)
São Paulo, Brazil
Motorcycle racing career statistics
MotoGP World Championship
Active years20022005, 2007
ManufacturersHonda (2002, 20042005)
Yamaha(2003)
Ducati (2007)
Championships0
Starts Wins Podiums Poles F. laps Points
82 3 14 1 5 732
500cc World Championship
Active years19902001
ManufacturersCagiva (19901992)
Suzuki (19931994)
Honda (19952001)
Championships0
Starts Wins Podiums Poles F. laps Points
163 4 18 3 8 1,347
250cc World Championship
Active years19881989
ManufacturersYamaha (19881989)
Championships0
Starts Wins Podiums Poles F. laps Points
14 0 0 0 0 30
50cc World Championship
Active years19861987
Championships0
Starts Wins Podiums Poles F. laps Points
17 0 0 0 0 14
Superbike World Championship
Active years2006
ManufacturersHonda (2006)
Championships0
Starts Wins Podiums Poles F. laps Points
24 1 6 0 2 246

Alex Barros (Alexandre Barros, born October 18, 1970 in São Paulo, Brazil) is a Brazilian former motorcycle road racer. After a long career in MotoGP, for 2006 he moved to the Superbike World Championship. He returned to MotoGP for 2007, but retired by the end of the season.[1]

Career[edit]

Early years[edit]

Barros started racing motorcycles at the age of 8, when he won on his debut in the Brazilian minibike championship. In the next two years, he was twice Brazilian moped champion. In 1981, he was the Brazilian 50cc Champion, and in 1985 he won the title of Brazilian's 250cc category. The year of 1986 saw his international début in the 80cc category—he lied about his age so he could race at the Spanish Grand Prix at the age of 15. He finished the championship in sixteenth place, scoring 6 points. In 1987, he also raced the 80cc championship, finishing seventeenth, scoring 8 points.

250cc[edit]

In 1988, Barros made his first race on the World Championship 250cc category, scoring no points. That same year, he was 3rd in the Latin American circuit of that same class. The next year, he finished 18th in the World Championship, scoring 30 points.

500cc and MotoGP[edit]

Alex Barros at Motegi in 2004

In 1990, Alex Barros was the youngest rider in history to join the top motorcycling category, the 500cc, at the age of 20. In his first year, he was 12th overall, with 57 points. Notable results included 8th in the United States and Germany, and 5th in the Belgium Grand Prix. Two years later, his first podium: a third place in the Netherlands.

The year of 1993 saw his breakthrough as he joined the Suzuki team. After qualifying third in the US Grand Prix, Barros had his first victory in Spain, finishing that year's world championship in sixth place. His teammate Kevin Schwantz was that year's champion. The following year, Barros scored in all but one the races. 1996 saw his best performance yet, finishing the championship at fourth, a feat he repeated in 2000, 2001 and 2002. His win at Mugello in 2001,[2] was the latest by a rider other than Valentino Rossi until 2009. In 2002, the first of MotoGP (with engine displacement capacity increased to up to 990cc) he scored 204 points and won races in Pacific and Valencia,[3] eleven points behind second place. 2003 was a difficult one for Barros due to injuries, but in 2004, he once again finished the championship in fourth, in a season dominated by Valentino Rossi, Sete Gibernau and Max Biaggi. In 2005, Barros returned to the top of the podium in Portugal,[4] however he did not mount a lasting championship challenge, and was not offered a ride for 2006. He returned to MotoGP in 2007, riding a Ducati GP7 for Pramac d'Antin. In pre-season testing he matched the factory Ducatis, and at midseason he was ahead of the factory rider Loris Capirossi. He came third at Mugello (ahead of Stoner) and fourth at Istanbul Park.

Superbike World Championship[edit]

For 2006 he was hired by the Klaffi Honda team in the Superbike World Championship (WSBK), paying around £100,000 of his own money to fund the ride.[5] After a satisfatctory debut weekend with two top 10 finishes, he took a pair of podium finishes at Round 2 in Phillip Island, and a second and a fourth in round four at Monza. At Brands Hatch he failed to qualify for Superpole, but bounced back from 18th on the grid to take a pair of top 10 finishes. The wet meeting at Assen was a disappointment for Barros, especially as he is a wet-weather expert.

His season was characterised by poor starts, but despite this he ended the season as the second highest Honda rider in the championship in sixth place, behind former champion James Toseland. At Imola he took his only WSBK win, and followed it with a second place in race 2.

Suzuka 8 Hours[edit]

In 1999, Barros and Japanese teammate Tadayuki Okada won the Suzuka 8 Hours endurance race riding a Honda RC45 superbike.[6]

Career statistics[edit]

By class[edit]

Class Years Race Win Podiums Pole FLap Pts
80 cc 1986–1987 17 0 0 0 0 14
250 cc 1988–1989 14 0 0 0 0 30
500 cc 1990–2001 163 4 18 3 8 1,347
MotoGP 2002–2005, 2007 82 3 14 2 6 732
Total 1986-2005, 2007 276 7 32 5 14 2,123

Races by year[edit]

[7]

Points system from 1969 to 1987:

Position 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
Points 15 12 10 8 6 5 4 3 2 1

Points system from 1988 to 1992:

Position 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15
Points 20 17 15 13 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1

Points system from 1993 onwards:

Position 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15
Points 25 20 16 13 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1

(key) (Races in bold indicate pole position; races in italics indicate fastest lap)

Year Class Team Bike 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 Pts Rank
1986 80cc Rieju ESP
Ret
NAT
Ret
GER
11
AUT
23
YUG
Ret
NED
Ret
6 16th
Autisa GBR
8
SWE
RSM
8
BWU
1987 80cc Casal ESP
Ret
GER
11
NAT
Ret
AUT
8
YUG
10
NED
22
GBR
CZE
Ret
8 17th
Arbizu RSM
7
POR
Ret
1988 250cc Venemotos-Yamaha TZ250 JPN
USA
ESP
EXP
NAT
GER
AUT
NED
BEL
YUG
FRA
GBR
SWE
CZE
BRA
Ret
0
1989 250cc Venemotos-Yamaha TZ250 JPN
Ret
AUS
10
USA
16
ESP
NAT
15
GER
AUT
19
YUG
15
NED
Ret
BEL
Ret
FRA
Ret
GBR
13
SWE
9
CZE
10
BRA
10
30 18th
1990 500cc Cagiva GP500 JPN
Ret
USA
8
ESP
Ret
NAT
Ret
GER
8
AUT
11
YUG
Ret
NED
10
BEL
5
FRA
Ret
GBR
11
SWE
9
CZE
Ret
HUN
9
AUS
57 12th
1991 500cc Cagiva GP500 JPN
10
AUS
8
USA
6
ESP
ITA
4
GER
AUT
EUR
NED
7
FRA
GBR
RSM
CZE
VDM
MAL
46 13th
1992 500cc Marlboro-Cagiva GP500 JPN
11
AUS
12
MAL
Ret
ESP
12
ITA
5
EUR
11
GER
7
NED
3
HUN
9
FRA
GBR
BRA
8
RSA
Ret
29 13th
1993 500cc Lucky Strike Suzuki RGV500 AUS
5
MAL
7
JPN
6
ESP
Ret
AUT
4
GER
Ret
NED
Ret
EUR
5
RSM
7
GBR
Ret
CZE
10
ITA
5
USA
2
FIM
1
125 6th
1994 500cc Lucky Strike Suzuki RGV500 AUS
8
MAL
7
JPN
5
ESP
4
AUT
7
GER
5
NED
2
ITA
7
FRA
6
GBR
Ret
CZE
8
USA
8
ARG
8
EUR
6
134 8th
1995 500cc Kanemoto-Honda NSR500 AUS
6
MAL
6
JPN
Ret
ESP
5
GER
7
ITA
7
NED
5
FRA
5
GBR
Ret
CZE
9
BRA
8
ARG
8
EUR
6
104 7th
1996 500cc Pileri-Honda NSR500 MAL
2
INA
2
JPN
Ret
ESP
8
ITA
6
FRA
7
NED
3
GER
8
GBR
7
AUT
5
CZE
9
IMO
8
CAT
8
BRA
5
AUS
4
158 4th
1997 500cc Gresini-Honda NSR500V MAL
11
JPN
10
ESP
8
ITA
6
AUT
13
FRA
6
NED
6
IMO
9
GER
6
BRA
Ret
GBR
3
CZE
8
CAT
Ret
INA
Ret
AUS
8
101 9th
1998 500cc Gresini-Honda NSR500 JPN
7
MAL
Ret
ESP
5
ITA
9
FRA
Ret
MAD
9
NED
4
GBR
5
GER
4
CZE
3
IMO
4
CAT
7
AUS
4
ARG
3
138 5th
1999 500cc MoviStar-Pons Honda NSR500 MAL
6
JPN
8
ESP
Ret
FRA
10
ITA
Ret
CAT
Ret
NED
10
GBR
5
GER
8
CZE
7
IMO
2
VAL
10
AUS
Ret
RSA
11
BRA
4
ARG
8
110 9th
2000 500cc Emerson Honda Pons NSR500 RSA
4
MAL
8
JPN
7
ESP
5
FRA
5
ITA
Ret
CAT
Ret
NED
1
GBR
14
GER
1
CZE
Ret
POR
10
VAL
5
BRA
2
PAC
7
AUS
4
163 4th
2001 500cc West Honda Pons NSR500 JPN
6
RSA
9
ESP
6
FRA
8
ITA
1
CAT
Ret
NED
4
GBR
3
GER
5
CZE
9
POR
Ret
VAL
2
PAC
2
AUS
4
MAL
7
BRA
4
182 4th
2002 MotoGP West Honda Pons NSR500 JPN
6
RSA
Ret
ESP
5
FRA
8
ITA
5
CAT
5
NED
2
GBR
3
GER
Ret
CZE
9
POR
5
BRA
4
204 4th
RC211V PAC
1
MAL
3
AUS
2
VAL
1
2003 MotoGP Gauloises Yamaha Tech3 YZR-M1 JPN
8
RSA
5
ESP
5
FRA
3
ITA
Ret
CAT
8
NED
8
GBR
Inj
GER
Ret
CZE
7
POR
11
BRA
12
PAC
6
MAL
15
AUS
Ret
VAL
6
101 9th
2004 MotoGP Repsol Honda RC211V RSA
4
ESP
3
FRA
7
ITA
6
CAT
Ret
NED
Ret
BRA
5
GER
2
GBR
9
CZE
Ret
POR
3
JPN
4
QAT
4
MAL
3
AUS
5
VAL
6
165 4th
2005 MotoGP Camel-Pons Honda RC211V ESP
4
POR
1
CHN
11
FRA
Ret
ITA
7
CAT
4
NED
7
USA
Ret
GBR
3
GER
5
CZE
4
JPN
Ret
MAL
8
QAT
9
AUS
Ret
TUR
9
VAL
5
147 8th
2007 MotoGP Pramac d'Antin Ducati GP7 QAT
9
ESP
11
TUR
4
CHN
14
FRA
Ret
ITA
3
CAT
8
GBR
7
NED
7
GER
Ret
USA
9
CZE
9
RSM
Ret
POR
Ret
JPN
8
AUS
5
MAL
12
VAL
7
115 10th

References[edit]

  1. ^ After 7th place, Barros retires from MotoGP Terra Esportes (in Portuguese language) November 4 2007, Retrieved May 24 2018
  2. ^ "Aoki finishes first – but it's a Honda Pons 1, 2!". Crash.net. Crash Media Group. 3 June 2002. Retrieved 22 July 2015. 
  3. ^ "Barros wins after breathtaking season finale". Crash.net. Crash Media Group. 3 November 2002. Retrieved 22 July 2015. 
  4. ^ "Barros wins first ever 'flag-to-flag', Sete falls". Crash.net. Crash Media Group. 17 April 2005. Retrieved 22 July 2015. 
  5. ^ Alex Barros career World Superbike statistics at worldsbk.com Archived 2009-04-10 at the Wayback Machine.
  6. ^ 1999 Suzuka 8 Hours results at www.motoracing-japan.com
  7. ^ Alex Barros career statistics at MotoGP.com

External links[edit]

Preceded by
Tohru Ukawa
Shinichi Itoh
Suzuka 8 Hours Winner
1999 (with Tadayuki Okada
Succeeded by
Tohru Ukawa
Daijiro Kato)