Alex McEachern

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Alex McEachern
Alex McEachern.jpg
McEachern in May 2015
MLA for Edmonton-Kingsway
In office
1986–1993
Preceded by Carl Paproski
Succeeded by District Abolished
Personal details
Born (1939-09-27) September 27, 1939 (age 77)
Hinton Trail, Alberta
Political party Alberta New Democratic Party

Alexander Duncan McEachern (born September 27, 1939) is a former provincial level politician from Alberta, Canada. He served as a member of the Legislative Assembly of Alberta from 1986 to 1993.[1]

Political career[edit]

McEachern ran for political office for the first time in the 1975 Alberta general election. He ran in the electoral district of Edmonton-Glenora as a candidate for the New Democrats but was badly defeated by incumbent cabinet minister Lou Hyndman.[2]

He made a second attempt to run for office in the 1979 general election in the Edmonton-Kingsway electoral district.[3] This time he finished second to incumbent Progressive Conservative MLA Kenneth Paproski. He attempted a third run for office in the 1982 Alberta general election with another second-place finish slightly improving his vote total to Progressive Conservative candidate Carl Paproski.[4]

McEachern would win his fourth attempt for public office defeating three other candidates in the 1986 Alberta general election.[5] He would be re-elected for a second and final term in the 1989 Alberta general election. His majority was reduced but he still defeated the other two candidates with a comfortable margin.[6] Edmonton-Kingsway was abolished due to redistribution in 1993. McEachern ran in the new electoral district of Edmonton-Mayfield for the 1993 Alberta general election. He was defeated by Liberal candidate Lance White.[7]

McEachern is still active with the Alberta New Democrats serving as the President of the Lesser Slave Lake electoral district.

References[edit]

  1. ^ [1]
  2. ^ "Edmonton-Glenora results 1975". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved November 12, 2009. 
  3. ^ "Edmonton-Kingsway results 1979". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved November 12, 2009. 
  4. ^ "Edmonton-Kingsway results 1982". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved November 12, 2009. 
  5. ^ "Edmonton-Kingsway results 1986". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved November 12, 2009. 
  6. ^ "Edmonton-Kingsway results 1989". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved November 12, 2009. 
  7. ^ "Edmonton-Mayfield results 1993". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved November 12, 2009. 

External links[edit]