Alexander Arzumanyan

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Alexander Arzumanyan
Ալեքսանդր Արզումանյան 04.jpg
Foreign Affairs Minister of Armenia
In office
1996 – February 4, 1998
President Levon Ter-Petrossian
Succeeded by Vartan Oskanian
Ambassador of Armenia to the United Nations
In office
1992–1996
Ambassador of Armenia to the United States
In office
1992–1993
Preceded by Office created
Succeeded by Rouben Shougarian
Personal details
Born (1959-12-24) December 24, 1959 (age 56)
Yerevan, Soviet Armenia
Alma mater Yerevan State University
Religion Armenian Apostolic Church


Alexander Arzumanyan (Armenian: Ալեքսանդր Ռոբերտի Արզումանյան; born December 24, 1959) was Armenia’s first ambassador to the United States (from 1992–1993) and to the United Nations (from 1992–1996). He served as minister of foreign affairs from 1996 until his resignation, with President Levon Ter-Petrossian, in 1998. Since then, he has been involved in local politics, as chairman of the Armenian National Movement (2000–2002), and in the private sector, as chief advisor to the president of Armagrobank (1998–2000). At present, he works with local NGOs in the area of human rights, democracy, and regional cooperation, and is a founding member of the Turkish Armenian Reconciliation Commission, an independent group of prominent Armenians and Turks. The TARC was established in July 2001 to promote mutual understanding and good will between the people of Armenia and Turkey, and to encourage improved relations between the countries. In July 2002, the TARC commissioned a groundbreaking legal analysis regarding the applicability of the United Nations Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide to the Armenian Genocide from the New York based International Center for Transitional Justice.

Arzoumanian holds a BS from People’s Friendship University in Moscow’s and an MS in mathematics from Yerevan State University. He was working as a theoretical mathematician when he became involved in the independence movement in the late 1980s. He ran the information center of the Armenian national movement, and published the Movement’s newspaper and other samizdat literature until Armenia became independent in 1991.

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