Alexander Legkov

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Alexander Legkov
Aleksandr Legkov by Ivan Isaev from Russian Ski Magazine.JPG
Aleksandr Legkov at the World Championships 2007 in Sapporo.
Country Russia
Full nameAlexander Gennadiyevich Legkov
Born (1983-05-07) May 7, 1983 (age 35)
Krasnoarmeysk, Moscow Oblast, RSFSR, USSR (now Russia)
Height1.77 m (5 ft 10 in)
Ski clubDinamo
World Cup career
Seasons2003–
Individual wins9
Indiv. podiums35

Alexander Gennadiyevich Legkov (Russian: Алекса́ндр Геннáдьевич Легков[1]; born 7 May 1983) is a retired Russian cross country skier who has been competing since 2002. He has five individual World Cup victories including one Tour de Ski title.[2].

Biography[edit]

Legkov participated in three Winter Olympic Games (2006, 2010, 2014).[3] Legkov finished in 4th place after a strong final push to catch then-leader Johan Olsson of Sweden at the 2010 Winter Olympics' 30 km double pursuit . Olsson finished in third place with Legkov 1.2 seconds behind. Legkov's next best result was 8th place in the 4 x 10 km event at the 2010 Games in Vancouver.

Legkov was second behind Germany's Tobias Angerer in the 2006–07 World Cup.

He earned a silver in the 4 x 10 km and finished twice in 6th place (15 km, 15 km + 15 km double pursuit) at the FIS Nordic World Ski Championship in Sapporo at 2007.

Alexander Legkov was Total winner of Tour de Ski 2012–13 when he defeated Dario Cologna, Maxim Vylegzhanin and Petter Northug racing up Alpe Cermis on 6 January 2013.[4]

On 6 April 2018, Legkov announced his retirement from sport during his participation at the competition "Sports Elite" in Khanty-Mansiysk.[5]

Doping case[edit]

In December 2016, the International Ski Federation provisionally suspended six Russian cross-country skiers linked to doping violations during the 2014 Winter Olympics, including Alexander Legkov.[6] In November 2017, Legkov was disqualified for doping offences by the International Olympic Committee, and his 2014 Olympic results were annulled.[7][8] In February 2018, the international Court of Arbitration for Sport ruled there was insufficient evidence that Legkov had broken anti-doping rules and the decision was overturned.[9]

World Cup results[edit]

All results are sourced from the International Ski Federation (FIS).[10]

Individual podiums[edit]

  • 9 victories – (6 WC, 3 SWC)
  • 35 podiums – (22 WC, 13 SWC)
No. Season Date Location Race Level Place
1  2006–07  16 December 2006 France La Clusaz, France 30 km Mass Start F World Cup 2nd
2 2 January 2007 Germany Oberstdorf, Germany 10 km + 10 km Pursuit C/F Stage World Cup 2nd
3 7 January 2007 Italy Val di Fiemme, Italy 11 km Pursuit F Stage World Cup 2nd
4 31 December 2006
– 7 January 2007
GermanyItaly Tour de Ski Overall Standings World Cup 2nd
5 20 January 2007 Russia Rybinsk, Russia 30 km Mass Start F World Cup 1st
6  2008–09  6 December 2008 France La Clusaz, France 30 km Mass Start F World Cup 3rd
7 8 March 2009 Finland Lahti, Finland 15 km Individual F World Cup 1st
8 18–22 March 2009 Sweden World Cup Final Overall Standings World Cup 3rd
9  2009–10  29 November 2009 Finland Kuusamo, Finland 15 km Individual C World Cup 3rd
10 20 December 2009 Slovenia Rogla, Slovenia 30 km Mass Start C World Cup 2nd
11  2010–11  29 November 2009 Finland Kuusamo, Finland 10 km Individual C Stage World Cup 2nd
12 26–28 November 2010 Finland Nordic Opening Overall Standings World Cup 1st
13 11 December 2010 Switzerland Davos, Switzerland 15 km Individual C World Cup 2nd
14 18 December 2010 France La Clusaz, France 30 km Mass Start F World Cup 3rd
15 1 January 2011 Germany Oberhof, Germany 15 km Pursuit C Stage World Cup 3rd
16 2011–12 3 January 2012 Italy Toblach, Italy 5 km Individual C Stage World Cup 1st
17 4 January 2012 Italy Cortina-Toblach, Italy 35 km Pursuit F Stage World Cup 3rd
18 8 January 2012 Italy Val di Fiemme, Italy 9 km Pursuit F Stage World Cup 1st
19 18 February 2012 Poland Szklarska Poręba, Poland 15 km Individual C World Cup 3rd
20 2012–13 1 December 2012 Finland Kuusamo, Finland 10 km Individual F Stage World Cup 1st
21 29 December 2012 Germany Oberhof, Germany 4 km Individual F Stage World Cup 3rd
22 30 December 2012 Germany Oberhof, Germany 15 km Pursuit C Stage World Cup 2nd
23 3 January 2013 Italy Cortina-Toblach, Italy 35 km Pursuit F Stage World Cup 2nd
24 29 December 2012
– 6 January 2013
GermanySwitzerlandItaly Tour de Ski Overall Standings World Cup 1st
25 2 February 2013 Russia Sochi, Russia 15 km + 15 km Skiathlon C/F World Cup 3rd
26 17 February 2013 Switzerland Davos, Switzerland 15 km Individual F World Cup 3rd
27 16 March 2013 Norway Oslo, Norway 50 km Mass Start F World Cup 1st
28 24 March 2013 Sweden Falun, Sweden 15 km Pursuit F Stage World Cup 3rd
29  2013–14  1 December 2013 Finland Nordic Opening Overall Standings World Cup 3rd
30 1 February 2014 Italy Toblach, Italy 15 km Individual C World Cup 1st
31 2 March 2014 Finland Lahti, Finland 15 km Individual F World Cup 3rd
32 8 March 2014 Sweden Oslo, Norway 50 km Mass Start C World Cup 3rd
33 15 March 2014 Sweden Falun, Sweden 15 km + 15 km Skiathlon C/F Stage World Cup 3rd
34 14–16 March 2014 Sweden World Cup Final Overall Standings World Cup 3rd
35  2016–17  17 December 2016 France La Clusaz, France 15 km Mass Start F World Cup 3rd

Team podiums[edit]

  • 3 victories
  • 12 podiums
No. Season Date Location Race Level Place Teammate(s)
1  2006–07  19 November 2006 Sweden Gällivare, Sweden 4 x 10 km Relay M World Cup 2nd Rochev / Pankratov / Dementyev
2 17 December 2006 France La Clusaz, France 4 x 10 km Relay M World Cup 1st Rochev / Pankratov / Dementyev
3 25 March 2007 Sweden Falun, Sweden 4 x 10 km Relay M World Cup 3rd Pankratov / Rochev / Vylegzhanin
4  2007–08  25 November 2007 Norway Beitostølen, Norway 4 x 10 km Relay M World Cup 3rd Rochev / Pankratov / Dementyev
5  2009–10  22 November 2009 Norway Beitostølen, Norway 4 x 10 km Relay M World Cup 2nd Vylegzhanin / Pankratov / Chernousov
6  2010–11  21 November 2010 Sweden Gällivare, Sweden 4 x 10 km Relay M World Cup 2nd Belov / Vylegzhanin / Sedov
7 19 December 2010 France La Clusaz, France 4 x 10 km Relay M World Cup 2nd Belov / Sedov / Vylegzhanin
8 6 February 2011 Russia Rybinsk, Russia 4 x 10 km Relay M World Cup 1st Belov / Vylegzhanin / Sedov
9  2012–13  25 November 2012 Sweden Gällivare, Sweden 4 x 7.5 km Relay M World Cup 3rd Belov / Vylegzhanin / Chernousov
10 2013–14 8 December 2013 Norway Lillehammer, Norway 4 x 7.5 km Relay M World Cup 1st Yaparov / Bessmertnykh / Vylegzhanin
11  2015–16  24 January 2016 Czech Republic Nové Město, Czech Republic 4 x 7.5 km Relay M World Cup 2nd Belov / Chervotkin / Ustiugov
12  2016–17  18 December 2016 France La Clusaz, France 4 x 7.5 km Relay M World Cup 2nd Belov / Chervotkin / Ustiugov

Personal life[edit]

Legkov is a member of PutinTeam, a political organization founded in support of Vladimir Putin and his policy.[11]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Karmanov, R.: "«Мой сын – Санька Лёгков...». Отец лидера сборной России открыл для «Советского спорта» то, что не рассказывал никому." Sovsport.ru, 8 December 2009. Retrieved 8 January 2012.
  2. ^ Biography of Alexander Legkov at the official FIS site
  3. ^ Alexander Legkov at sports-reference.com
  4. ^ http://www.fiscrosscountry.com/news/legkov-dominates-alpe-cermis-win-tour-ski-updated,3558.html
  5. ^ Олимпийский чемпион Александр Легков объявил о завершении международной карьеры
  6. ^ Six Russian XC Skiers and Two Biathletes Provisionally Suspended due to McLaren Report
  7. ^ "Decision of the IOC Disciplinary Commission" (PDF). olympic.org.
  8. ^ "МОК лишил Легкова золота Сочи на 50 км, Россия теряет серебро в эстафете" (in Russian). Sport-Express. Retrieved 1 November 2017.
  9. ^ "Twenty-eight Russian athletes have doping bans overturned by Cas". The Guardian. 1 February 2018. Retrieved 1 February 2018.
  10. ^ "Athlete : LEGKOV Alexander". FIS-Ski. International Ski Federation. Retrieved 13 March 2018.
  11. ^ https://openski.ru/friday/5280/legkov-vstupil-v-putin-team.html

External links[edit]