Alexander Mamut

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Alexander Mamut
Alexander Mamut 2018.jpg
Mamut (2018)
Born (1960-01-29) 29 January 1960 (age 61)[1]
Moscow, Russia
CitizenshipRussian
EducationMoscow State University
OccupationBusinessman and investor
Known foradvisor to Boris Yeltsin
Net worthUS$2.4 billion (Forbes 2018)[2]
Spouse(s)Widowed
Children5

Alexander Leonidovich Mamut also spelled Aleksandr, (Russian: Алекса́ндр Леони́дович Маму́т; born 29 January 1960, Moscow)[1] is a Russian billionaire lawyer, banker and investor.

On the Forbes 2016 list of the world's billionaires, he was ranked #908 with a net worth of US$2.5 billion.[2]

Early life and education[edit]

Alexander Mamut was born on 29 January 1960. His father is Leonid Solomonovich Mamut, a lawyer and one of the authors of the Russian Constitution. His mother, Cicilia Ludwigovna, is a defense attorney. In 1977, Mamut graduated from Moscow gymnasium #17.

He then studied law at Moscow State University, graduating in 1982.

Career[edit]

Mamut began his career as a lawyer.[2]

In 1990 together with Andrey Gloriozonov, Mamut founded "Business and Cooperation” Bank, that was renamed in 1991 into Commercial Bank “Imperial”. The bank was founded to service companies in the field of fuel and energy. Its biggest clients were Gazprom and Lukoil.

In 1990 Mamut founded “ALM-Consulting” law firm (ALM abbreviated after Mamut’s name) and served as Managing Partner there throughout 1990–1993. In 1991, ALM Consulting partnered with Frere Cholmeley Bischoff, a law firm based in London and headed by Tim Razzall from 1990 to 1994, in order to establish many offshore shell companies with which ALM Consulting would create the offshore shell company through Frere Cholmeley Bischoff for $300 and then ALM Consulting would sell that same offshore shell company for $5000.[3][4] In 1993, Roman Kolodkin (Russian: Роман Колодкин)[a] introduced Mamut to Igor Shuvalov who worked at the Russia's Ministry of Foreign Affairs in the legal department as an attache.[7] Mamut hired Shuvalov as a senior advisor and instructed Shuvalov to establish many offshore companies to conduct special assignments to money launder very large amounts of cash away from Russia.[7][8] In 1995 when Shuvalov was the head of ALM, Mamut introduced Shuvalov to Roman Abramovich, Alisher Usmanov, and Oleg Boyko who established Shuvalov's first investment which was in a business associated with Boyko.[7][8] ALM was the preferred law firm for Russian oligarchs during the 1990s including Alisher Usmanov, Roman Abramovich, Boris Berezovsky, Oleg Boyko, and others.[7][9][10]

During the 1990s, Mikhail Kasyanov, while he was the head of the department of external loans and foreign debt at the Russian Ministry of Finance, made decisions in support of Mamut.[11]

Mamut founded the Design Bureau "Company of Project Financing" (KOPF) (Russian: ЗАО КБ "Компания по проектному финансированию" (ЗАО КБ "КОПФ")), which is a bank, in 1993, and served as its chief executive officer until 1998. In 1996, KOPF donated 280 million rubles to Boris Yeltsin's election campaign.[11] Meanwhile, he was the co-founder and director of Sedmoy Continent from 1993 to 1997. He was the founder of ALM Development and remained an investor until 2001.

Mamut served as the Chairman of Moscow Business World (MDM-Bank) from 1999 to 2002.

On 31 May 1999, Mamut was elected to the board of directors of Sobinbank (Russian: Собинбанк).[12][13]

In 2007, he also founded the “Most” Restaurant and Club. Mamut’s “A&NN” Investment Company acquired 100% of shares of Evroset from Evgeniy Chichvarkin and Timur Artemiev in 2008. By October 2008, he sold 49.9% to VimpelCom.

Mamut acquired 60% of the Spar Moscow Holding in 2009. He also acquired the “Torpedo-ZIL” football club for the symbolic price of $1. Two years later, in 2011, he invested in the Nomos-Bank. He is a large investor in Ingosstrakh, the insurance company, and Troika-Dialog, an investment bank.[14] He has also invested in Polymetal International, a mining company, and PIK Group, a construction company.[2]

Entertainment Holdings[edit]

He founded the SUP Company in 2006, and acquired LiveJournal Russia in 2007.

In May 2011 after James Daunt and Alexander Mamut were introduced through a mutual friend, Mamut acquired Waterstones, a UK-based bookstore chain, through Capital Fund Management Limited, a subsidiary of Mamut's A&NN company, for the equivalent of $66 million.[15] Mamut then named James Daunt as the managing director of Waterstones, replacing Dominic Myers.[16][17] Mamut later sold off a majority stake in April 2018 to Elliott Advisors, valuing the company at $250 million with N M Rothschild & Sons handling the deal, and Elliott retained James Daunt as CEO of Waterstones.[16][18][19][b]

Mamut became the sole owner of the SUP Media in December 2012.[21] In 2013, he acquired Lenta.ru.[22] By 2014, he became the Chairman of Rambler&Co.[2] He is also the owner of Lenta.ru, a news website.[23]

He acquired sports betting firm Rambler in 2016, selling a 46.5 percent stake to Sberbank in December 2019.[24] Mamut was subsequently involved in an intellectual property rights dispute between Rambler and Sberbank.[24]

A&NN acquired the Moscow movie theaters “Pioneer” in 2008 and the Khudozhestvenny in 2016. They later acquired movie chains Cinema Park and Formula Kino in 2017.[25]

In 2020, Mamut sold Rambler to Sberbank.[26]

Political activity[edit]

Mamut made donations to Boris Yeltsin's 1996 re-election campaign.[14] Mamut served as an economic adviser to the chief of the Russian presidential administration, Alexander Voloshin from 1998 to 1999.

Philanthropy[edit]

Mamut served as the Chairman of the Board of Trustees of Teatr Praktika, a theatre whose director was Eduard Boyakov. By 2009, he served as the Chairman of the Board of Trustees of the Strelka Institute for Media, Architecture and Design. The Institute aims to change the landscape of Russian cities.[27]

Personal life[edit]

Mamut is a widower from his second marriage.[2] He has five children.[2] He resides in Moscow, Russia,[2] with an additional residence in Kensington, London. He also owns a yacht.[14]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Later, from 5 November 2009 until 15 September 2015, Roman Kolodkin was the Russian Ambassador to the Netherlands.[5][6]
  2. ^ In August, Elliott Management Corporation acquired Barnes & Noble turning Barnes & Noble into a privately held subsidiary of Elliott and named James Daunt the CEO of both Waterstones and Barnes & Noble with Daunt relocating from London to New York.[20]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Billionaires: Aleksandr Leonidovich MAMUT". Wealth-X. Archived from the original on 2017-01-03. Retrieved 2017-01-02.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h "The World's Billionaires (2016 ranking): #722 Alexander Mamut". Forbes. March 1, 2016. Retrieved 2017-01-02.
  3. ^ "A man without bones Meduza special correspondent Anastasia Yakoreva tells how an excellent lawyer and successful negotiator Alexander Mamut broke down in the media business". Meduza. 3 March 2021. Retrieved 17 April 2021.
  4. ^ Lindsay, Robert (30 November 1998). "Freres: an offer it could not refuse: Robert Lindsay takes a look at the causes of Frere Cholmeley Bischoff's demise and assesses the prospects of its successor firms". The Lawyer. Retrieved 17 April 2021.
  5. ^ "УКАЗ Президента РФ от 05.11.2009 N 1239 "О НАЗНАЧЕНИИ КОЛОДКИНА Р.А. ЧРЕЗВЫЧАЙНЫМ И ПОЛНОМОЧНЫМ ПОСЛОМ РОССИЙСКОЙ ФЕДЕРАЦИИ В КОРОЛЕВСТВЕ НИДЕРЛАНДОВ И ПОСТОЯННЫМ ПРЕДСТАВИТЕЛЕМ РОССИЙСКОЙ ФЕДЕРАЦИИ ПРИ ОРГАНИЗАЦИИ ПО ЗАПРЕЩЕНИЮ ХИМИЧЕСКОГО ОРУЖИЯ В ГААГЕ, КОРОЛЕВСТВО НИДЕРЛАНДОВ, ПО СОВМЕСТИТЕЛЬСТВУ"" [DECREE of the President of the Russian Federation of 05.11.2009 N 1239 "ON THE APPOINTMENT OF KOLODKIN RA THE EMERGENCY AND Plenipotentiary AMBASSADOR OF THE RUSSIAN FEDERATION IN THE KINGDOM OF THE NETHERLANDS AND PERMANENT REPRESENTATIVE OF THE RUSSIAN FEDERATION ORGANIZATION]. Russian Ministry of Foreign Affairs website (in Russian). 5 November 2009. Archived from the original on 6 May 2014. Retrieved 25 January 2021.
  6. ^ "Указ Президента Российской Федерации от 15.09.2015 № 462 "О Колодкине Р.А."" [Decree of the President of the Russian Federation of September 15, 2015 No. 462 "On R. Kolodkin."]. Russian Ministry of Foreign Affairs website (in Russian). 15 September 2015. Archived from the original on 4 March 2016. Retrieved 25 January 2021.
  7. ^ a b c d "Вице-премьер по роскоши Как складывалась карьера Игоря Шувалова" [Deputy Prime Minister for Luxury How did Igor Shuvalov's career develop?]. Meduza (in Russian). 22 July 2016. Archived from the original on 20 January 2018. Retrieved 25 January 2021.
  8. ^ a b "ХОРОШИЙ ПАПА, ПЛОХОЙ ПАПА: ИСТОРИЯ ШУВАЛОВА И ЕГО ДЕТЕЙ: Сыну — самолет и элитный военный билет, дочери — балетную пачку и активы" [GOOD DAD, BAD DAD: THE STORY OF SHUVALOV AND HIS CHILDREN: Son - an airplane and an elite military ID, daughter - a ballet tutu and assets]. RussianGate (russiangate.com) (in Russian). 27 October 2017. Archived from the original on 8 November 2017. Retrieved 25 January 2021.
  9. ^ Alpert, Bill (3 December 2011). "How a Putin Aide Gained $119 Million". Barron's. Retrieved 25 January 2021.
  10. ^ Amos, Howard (7 November 2012). "Think Tank Reopens Shuvalov Corruption Scandal". The Moscow Times. Archived from the original on 21 January 2020. Retrieved 25 January 2021.
  11. ^ a b "КТО ЕСТЬ КТО: МАМУТ - ЧЕЛОВЕК КАСЬЯНОВА И ЛУЖКОВА" [WHO IS WHO: MAMUT - THE MAN OF KASIANOV AND LUZHKOV]. corruption.ru (in Russian). 28 February 2001. Archived from the original on 28 February 2001. Retrieved 17 April 2021.
  12. ^ "Связи Александра Мамута" [Alexander Mamut's connections.]. sovesti.net (in Russian). 12 December 1999. Archived from the original on 12 December 1999. Retrieved 15 April 2021.
  13. ^ "КБ Собинбанк ("Содействие общественным инициативам")" [KB Sobinbank ("Assistance to Public Initiatives")]. sovesti.net (in Russian). 12 December 1999. Archived from the original on 12 December 1999. Retrieved 15 April 2021.
  14. ^ a b c "Alexander Mamut profile: probably the most powerful oligarch you have never heard of". The Daily Telegraph. February 4, 2011. Retrieved June 1, 2016.
  15. ^ "UK Book Chain Waterstone's Sold to Russian Billionaire". Publishing Perspectives. 2011-05-20. Retrieved 2015-11-19.
  16. ^ a b Segal, David (2019-08-08). "Can Britain's Top Bookseller Save Barnes & Noble?". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2019-08-08.
  17. ^ Campbell, Lisa (20 May 2011). "Waterstone's sold, Daunt in, Myers out". The Bookseller. Archived from the original on 17 April 2021. Retrieved 17 April 2021.
  18. ^ Campbell, Lisa (9 April 2019). "Waterstones sale expected to complete this month". The Bookseller. Archived from the original on 17 April 2021. Retrieved 17 April 2021.
  19. ^ Jones, Philip (7 June 2019). "Elliott to buy Barnes & Noble; Daunt will run both chains". The Bookseller. Retrieved 17 April 2021.
  20. ^ "Elliott Completes Acquisition of Barnes & Noble". Business Wire. 7 August 2019. Retrieved 17 April 2021.
  21. ^ Rose, Scott (March 27, 2012). "Rostelecom, MegaFon May Buy Euroset From Mamut, Kommersant Says". Bloomberg.
  22. ^ "Russia Lenta.ru editor Timchenko fired in Ukraine row". BBC. 12 March 2014. Retrieved 17 April 2021.
  23. ^ Hille, Kathrin; Weaver, Courtney (February 26, 2015). "Russia: Left out in the cold". Financial Times. Retrieved June 2, 2016.
  24. ^ a b Seddon, Max (16 December 2019). "Russian web giant Rambler seeks to drop criminal case against Nginx". Financial Times. Archived from the original on 17 December 2019.
  25. ^ "Russian investment company A&NN acquires the country's two largest Cinema operators - IHS Technology". technology.ihs.com. Retrieved 2019-08-08.
  26. ^ "A man without bones Meduza special correspondent Anastasia Yakoreva tells how an excellent lawyer and successful negotiator Alexander Mamut broke down in the media business". Meduza. 3 March 2021. Retrieved 17 April 2021.
  27. ^ "AD Interviews: Alexander Mamut". ArchDaily. 2013-04-23. Retrieved 2015-11-19.