Alexander Stuart, 5th Earl of Moray

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Sir Alexander Stuart, 5th Earl of Moray KT (8 May 1634 – 1 November 1701), was a Scottish nobleman who remained loyal to Roman Catholic James VII of Scotland (James II of England).[1]


Alexander Stuart succeeded his father, James to the Earldom of Moray on 4 March 1653. In 1654 he was under Cromwell's Act of Grace fined £3,500 which was reduced to £1,166 13s.,[2] but in January 1656 he presented a petition for the remission of his fine, because he "was a child during the late differences", and because his estate was "small and much charged".[3] On 22 January 1657 it was ordered that, on his giving security to the Council of Scotland to pay £500. before 1 February 1658, the residue of his fine should be remitted.[4]

He was admitted Lord Justice General on 1 June 1675, appointed a Lord of the Treasury on 27 September 1678, nominated an Extraordinary Lord of Session on 17 July 1680, and on 2 November of the same year appointed Secretary of State in succession to the Duke of Lauderdale. Previous to his appointment he was known as an active opponent of the Covenanters. In 1675 he specially exerted himself in putting down conventicles in Elgin,[5] and in March 1678 he was deputed by the council to London to encourage King Charles II in his policy of repression.[6] Afterwards he co-operated with James II, not only in his unconstitutional procedure, but in his endeavours to introduce Roman Catholicism. In 1686, when an attempt was made to obtain toleration for the Catholics, he was nominated for this purpose Lord High Commissioner to the Scottish Parliament, and in the following year he was made a knight of the Thistle. During the Glorious Revolution he was deprived of all his offices. He died at Donibristle on 1 November 1701, and was carried to Darnaway and buried in the church of Dyke on 24 January 1702.[7]


Alexander Stuart was the son of James Stuart, 4th Earl of Moray and Margaret Home. He married Emilia Balfour, daughter of Sir William Balfour.[8] They had five children: James, Lord Doune; Charles, 6th Earl of Moray; John; Francis, 7th Earl of Moray; and Mary. In 1687, he became one of the founding knights in the Order of the Thistle.[9]


  1. ^ Henderson 1898 lists him as "Stuart, Alexander 4th Earl of Moray"
  2. ^ Henderson 1898 cites Cal. State Papers, Dom. 1655, p. 72.
  3. ^ Henderson 1898 cites Cal. State Papers, Dom. 1656, p. 152.
  4. ^ Henderson 1898 cites Cal. State Papers, Dom. 1657, p. 248.
  5. ^ Henderson 1898 cites Wodrow, History, vol. ii. p. 284.
  6. ^ Henderson 1898 cites Wodrow, History, vol. ii. p. 419.
  7. ^ Henderson 1898.
  8. ^ Page 707 Debrett's Peerage of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, Vol. 2
  9. ^ Lundy, Darryl. "page 2508 section i25076". The Peerage. [unreliable source?]


Political offices
Preceded by
The Duke of Lauderdale
Secretary of State, Scotland
With: The Earl of Middleton 1682-1684
The Earl of Melfort 1684-1688
Succeeded by
The Earl of Melfort
Parliament of Scotland
Preceded by
The Duke of Queensberry
Lord High Commissioner
Succeeded by
The Duke of Hamilton
Peerage of Scotland
Preceded by
James Stuart
Earl of Moray
Succeeded by
Charles Stuart