Alexei Krasnozhon

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Alexei Krasnozhon
2016 Grand Prix of Figure Skating Final Alexei Krasnozhon IMG 3646.jpg
Krasnozhon at the 2016−17 JGP Final
Personal information
Native nameАлексей Дмитриевич Красножон (Russian)
Full nameAlexei Dmitriyevich Krasnozhon
Country representedUnited States United States
Former country(ies) representedRussia Russia
Born (2000-04-11) 11 April 2000 (age 19)
Saint Petersburg, Russia
ResidenceDallas, Texas, United States
Height1.75 m (5 ft 9 in)
CoachPeter Cain, Darlene Cain
Former coachOleg Tataurov, Tatiana Mishina, Olga Kartashov
ChoreographerScott Brown, Evgeni Nemerovski
Former choreographerTatiana Prokofieva
Skating clubStars FSC of Texas
Former skating clubYubileyny
Training locationsEuless, Texas
Former training locationsSaint Petersburg
Began skating2005
World standing23 (2018–19)
37 (2017–18)
58 (2016–17)
120 (2015–16)
ISU personal best scores
Combined total236.35
2017 JGP final
Short program81.33
2017 JGP final
Free skate155.02
2017 JGP final

Alexei Dmitriyevich Krasnozhon (Russian: Алексей Дмитриевич Красножон;[1] born 11 April 2000) is a Russian figure skater who competes for the United States. He is the 2017 CS Tallinn Trophy silver medalist, 2017 Junior Grand Prix Final champion, and 2017 U.S. national junior champion. He skated for Russia earlier in his career, making his last international appearance in December 2013.

Personal life[edit]

Krasnozhan was born on April 11, 2000 in Saint Petersburg, Russia.[2] His mother, Natalia, is an endocrinologist and his father, Dmitri, is an oncologist.[3] He has two younger sisters, named Dana and Sofia.[4]

In 2014, Krasnozhon moved to Dallas, Texas. He lived for a few months with a Russian family who he had known from his childhood and then with Peter and Darlene Cain for five years.[5][6] His parents visited him often.[6] He enrolled in a private online high school and expressed interest in a business degree from Georgetown University or SMU. In March 2018, he said that he planned to apply for U.S. citizenship.[7]

Career[edit]

In Russia[edit]

Krasnozhon began skating as a five-year-old. At age seven, he became a student of Alexei Mishin, as well as his wife Tatiana Mishina and their assistant coach Oleg Tataurov. He competed for Russia at the Volvo Open Cup in January 2013, winning gold on the advanced novice level, and placed twelfth at the 2013 Russian Junior Championships.[8]

Krasnozhon won the junior silver medal at the Denkova-Staviski Cup in December 2013. He missed much of the season due to a back injury.[9]

Switch to the United States[edit]

In March 2014, Krasnozhon announced that he planned to compete for the United States and would be coached by Peter Cain and Darlene Cain in Euless, Texas.[6][10] He qualified for the 2015 US Championships on the junior level and won the pewter medal.

On July 1, 2015, the Russian Figure Skating Federation released Krasnozhon so that he could compete internationally for the United States.[6] While training in Moscow, Krasnozhon performed full run-throughs of his programs about once a week, but he began doing them daily after moving to Texas.[11]

2015–2016 season[edit]

Making his Junior Grand Prix (JGP) debut, Krasnozhon won the bronze medal in August 2015 in Riga, Latvia. He then placed fifth in Torun, Poland. After receiving the junior gold medal at the Midwestern Sectionals, he closed his season by winning the junior bronze medal at the 2016 U.S. Championships, finishing behind Tomoki Hiwatashi and Kevin Shum.

2016–2017 season[edit]

Competing in the 2016 JGP series, Krasnozhon won silver in Ostrava, Czech Republic, and then gold in Ljubljana, Slovenia. He qualified to the Junior Grand Prix Final in Marseille, France, where he finished fifth. At the 2017 U.S. Championships, he won the junior men's title. He qualified to the free skate at the 2017 World Junior Championships in Taipei, Taiwan.

2017–2018 season[edit]

Making his senior international debut, Krasnozhon placed fourth at the Philadelphia Summer International in early August 2017. Competing in the Junior Grand Prix series, Krasnozhon won gold medals in Brisbane, Australia, and Zagreb, Croatia, which qualified him for the Final for a second time.[12] Competing at his first Challenger event, and he won a silver medal at the 2017 CS Tallinn Trophy. Krasnozhon then won gold at the Junior Grand Prix Final in Nagoya, Japan. He outscored the silver medalist, Camden Pulkinen, by more than 19 points and set a new personal best total score, 236.35 points, at the competition.

Krasnozhon competed in the senior ranks at the 2018 U.S. Championships, placing eighth in the short program, thirteenth in the free skate, and tenth overall. In March, he placed first in the short program at the 2018 World Junior Championships in Sofia, Bulgaria. While attempting a quad salchow during his free skate, he sustained a Grade 2 sprain of all three major ligaments in his right ankle, causing him to withdraw.[7]

Krasnozhon changed coaches during the off-season, deciding to train under Olga Ganicheva and Alexei Letov at the Dr. Pepper Starcenter in Plano, Texas.[5]

2018–2019 season[edit]

Krasnozhon started his season off at the 2018 CS Nebelhorn Trophy, where he placed fifth overall. Krasnozhon was invited to two senior Grand Prix events, the 2018 Grand Prix in Finland and 2018 Rostelecom Cup. Making his Grand Prix debut, Krasnozhon placed sixth at the 2018 Grand Prix in Finland and eighth at the 2018 Rostelecom Cup. Krasnozhon withdrew from the 2018 CS Golden Spin of Zagreb in December 2018.

At the 2019 U.S. Championships, Krasnozhon placed fifth. He said "this was a big step forward for me, I need quads, triple jumps and better endurance. For each quad, it’s a different approach, and I just need to listen to my coach."[13] Assigned to compete at the 2019 World Junior Championships, he placed fifth in the short program, making a minor error on his Lutz-loop combination.[14]

Programs[edit]

Season Short program Free skating Exhibition
2018–2019
[5]

2017–2018
[15]
2016–2017
[2][11]
  • Rodeo
    by Aaron Copland
    choreo. by Scott Brown
    • 50. Four Dance Episodes:
      III. Saturday Night Waltz
    • 51. Four Dance Episodes:
      IV. Hoedown
2015–2016
[16]
2014–2015
2013–2014
  • Love Story
    by Francis Lai
    choreo. by Scott Brown
  • Tango Amore
    by Edvin Marton
    choreo. by Scott Brown
2012–2013
  • Russian folk music
    choreo. by Tatiana Prokofieva

Competitive highlights[edit]

GP: Grand Prix; CS: Challenger Series; JGP: ISU Junior Grand Prix

For the United States[edit]

International[8]
Event 14–15 15–16 16–17 17–18 18–19
GP Rostelecom Cup 8th
GP Finland 7th
CS Golden Spin WD
CS Nebelhorn 5th
CS Tallinn Trophy 2nd
Egna Trophy 1st
Philadelphia 4th
International: Junior[8]
Junior Worlds 8th WD 11th
JGP Final 5th 1st
JGP Australia 1st
JGP Croatia 1st
JGP Czech Republic 2nd
JGP Latvia 3rd
JGP Poland 5th
JGP Slovenia 1st
Philadelphia 1st
National[1][4]
U.S. Champ. 4th J 3rd J 1st J 10th 5th
Midwestern Sect. 1st J
Southwestern Reg. 1st J 2nd
J = Junior level; TBD = Assigned; WD = Withdrew

For Russia[edit]

International[8]
Event 11–12 12–13 13–14
Denkova-Staviski Cup 2nd J
Volvo Open Cup 1st N
National[1]
Russian Junior Champ. 14th 12th
Levels: N = Advanced novice; J = Junior

Detailed results[edit]

Small medals for short and free programs awarded only at ISU Championships.

2018–19 season
Date Event SP FS Total
March 28–31, 2019 2019 Gardena Spring Trophy 1
74.17
2
145.95
1
220.12
Jan. 19 - 27, 2019 2019 U.S. Championships 5
82.53
5
151.99
5
234.52
November 16–18, 2018 2018 Rostelecom Cup 6
75.32
8
132.69
8
208.01
2–4 November 2018 2018 Grand Prix of Helsinki 8
74.05
6
136.98
7
211.03
September 26–29, 2018 2018 CS Nebelhorn Trophy 6
67.32
5
126.78
5
194.10
2018–19 season
Date Event Level SP FS Total
March 4–10, 2019 2019 World Junior Championships Junior 5
79.98
12
131.49
11
211.47
2017–18 season
Date Event Level SP FS Total
March 5–11, 2018 2018 World Junior Championships Junior 1
80.28
WD WD
Dec. 29 – Jan. 8, 2017 2018 U.S. Championships Senior 8
82.58
13
141.00
10
223.58
December 7–10, 2017 2017−18 Junior Grand Prix Final Junior 1
81.33
1
155.02
1
236.35
November 21–26, 2017 2017 CS Tallinn Trophy Senior 3
80.20
2
142.19
2
222.39
September 27–30, 2017 2017 JGP Croatia Junior 1
80.26
2
145.22
1
225.48
August 23–26, 2017 2017 JGP Australia Junior 1
75.04
1
134.33
1
209.37
August 3–5, 2017 2017 Philadelphia Summer International Senior 1
76.37
7
129.88
4
206.25
2016–17 season
Date Event Level SP FS Total
March 15–19, 2017 2017 World Junior Championships Junior 8
76.50
10
134.97
8
211.47
January 14–22, 2017 2017 U.S. Junior Championships Junior 2
66.89
1
144.16
1
211.05
December 8–11, 2016 2016–17 Junior Grand Prix Final Junior 5
71.48
6
137.37
5
208.85
September 21–25, 2016 2016 JGP Slovenia Junior 2
71.98
1
139.20
1
211.18
August 31–September 3, 2016 2016 JGP Czech Republic Junior 2
75.10
2
148.50
2
223.60
2015–16 season
Date Event Level SP FS Total
January 15–24, 2016 2016 U.S. Junior Championships Junior 7
53.96
3
122.25
3
176.21
September 23–27, 2015 2015 JGP Poland Junior 5
62.44
3
132.14
5
194.58
August 26–30, 2015 2015 JGP Latvia Junior 3
67.53
3
127.15
3
194.68
August 3–5, 2015 2015 Philadelphia Summer International Junior 1
65.56
1
114.11
1
179.67
2014–15 season
Date Event Level SP FS Total
January 18–25, 2015 2015 U.S. Junior Championships Junior 6
60.52
2
129.70
4
190.22
2013–14 season
Date Event Level SP FS Total
November 29–December 1, 2013 2013 Denkova-Staviski Cup Junior 2
51.72
2
116.55
2
168.27
2012–13 season
Date Event Level SP FS Total
February 1–3, 2013 2013 Russian Junior Championships Junior 5
67.21
17
110.85
12
178.06

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Красножон Алексей Дмитриевич" [Alexei Dmitriyevich Krasnozhon]. fskate.ru (in Russian). Archived from the original on July 25, 2016.
  2. ^ a b "Alexei KRASNOZHON: 2016/2017". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on July 4, 2017.CS1 maint: Unfit url (link)
  3. ^ Krasnozhon, Alexei. "Parents". Official Homepage of Alex Krasnozhon. Retrieved 5 September 2015.
  4. ^ a b "Aleksei Krasnozhon". IceNetwork.com. Archived from the original on July 20, 2016.
  5. ^ a b c Flade, Tatjana (June 30, 2018). "USA's Krasnozhon ready to bounce back after suffering injury". Golden Skate.
  6. ^ a b c d Rutherford, Lynn (January 23, 2015). "Torgashev sets new U.S. standard for junior men". IceNetwork.com.
  7. ^ a b Brannen, Sarah S. (March 30, 2018). "The Inside Edge: Krasnozhon avoids major injury". IceNetwork.com.
  8. ^ a b c d "Competition Results: Alexei KRASNOZHON". International Skating Union.
  9. ^ Krasnozhon, Alexei. "About Me". Official Homepage of Alex Krasnozhon. Retrieved 5 September 2015.
  10. ^ Krasnozhon, Alexei (March 25, 2014). "then I passed my junior test)" (Instagram).[permanent dead link]
  11. ^ a b Han, Brooklee (November 8, 2016). "Alexei Krasnozhon chasing his American dream". International Figure Skating.
  12. ^ "ISU JGP Croatia Cup 2017 - Junior Men". www.isuresults.com. Retrieved 9 December 2017.
  13. ^ "Chen dominates U.S. men to win third national title". Golden Skate. Archived from the original on 29 January 2019. Retrieved 27 January 2019.
  14. ^ Slater, Paula (March 6, 2019). "Camden in true form at Junior Worlds". Golden Skate.
  15. ^ "Alexei KRASNOZHON: 2017/2018". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on May 19, 2018.CS1 maint: Unfit url (link)
  16. ^ "Alexei KRASNOZHON: 2015/2016". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on May 28, 2016.CS1 maint: Unfit url (link)

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External links[edit]