Alfred Appel

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Alfred Appel, Jr. (January 31, 1934 – May 2, 2009)[1][2] was a scholar noted for his investigations into the works of Vladimir Nabokov, modern art, and Jazz modernism.[3]

As a student at Cornell University, Appel took a course from Nabokov. His education was interrupted by a stint in the Army, after which he completed his undergraduate education and PhD in English Literature at Columbia University in 1963.

After teaching at Columbia for a few years, he joined the faculty of Northwestern University, where he taught until his retirement in 2000. He died of heart failure.[4] Appel was married until his death to Nina Appel, dean of Loyola University Chicago's law school from 1983-2004. They had two children, Karen Oshman and television writer and producer Richard Appel.[1][5][6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Noted English Scholar, Author Alfred Appel Dies at Age 75". Northwestern University. May 5, 2009. Archived from the original on 11 May 2009. Retrieved May 7, 2009. 
  2. ^ Grimes, William (May 7, 2009). "Alfred Appel Jr., Expert on Nabokov and Author, Dies at 75". The New York Times. Retrieved May 7, 2009. 
  3. ^ Jensen, Trevor (19 May 2009). "Alfred Appel Jr., 1934-2009: Scholar, author, friend of Nabokov". Chicago Tribune. Retrieved 22 October 2015. 
  4. ^ Grimes, William (May 7, 2009). "Alfred Appel Jr., Expert on Nabokov and Author, Dies at 75". The New York Times. Retrieved April 23, 2010. 
  5. ^ http://www.luc.edu/law/faculty/appel.html
  6. ^ David L. Ulin (1998-12-06). "In His Prime Time". Chicago Tribune. p. 14.