Alfred Kuchevsky

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Alfred Kuchevsky
Born (1931-05-17)17 May 1931
Moscow, Russian SFSR,
Soviet Union
Died May 15, 2000(2000-05-15) (aged 68)
Moscow, Russia
Height 5 ft 11 in (180 cm)
Weight 175 lb (79 kg; 12 st 7 lb)
Position Defense
Shot Left
Played for Krylya Sovetov Moscow
National team  Soviet Union
Playing career 1949–1961

Alfred Iosifovich Kuchevsky (Russian: Альфред Иосифович Кучевский; 17 May 1931 – 15 May 2000) was a Soviet professional ice hockey defenseman. He played for the HC Krylya Sovetov Moscow of the Soviet Championship League and represented the Soviet Union national ice hockey team in international competitions. Olympic champion 1956, bronze 1960. World champion 1954, silver in 1955 and 1958.

He was born on 17 May 1931 in Moscow, Soviet Union. He was Jewish.[1][2] His father worked as Director of the Krylya Sovetov Stadium near the metro station Semyonovskaya.[3]

He attended Moscow School No. 429.[4]

While playing for the Krylya Sovetov Moscow in 1949–61, he won the USSR Cup in 1951, was a runner-up twice (1952, 1954), and became the national ice hockey champion in 1957, earning silver three times (1955, 1956, 1958), and bronze five times (1950, 1951, 1954, 1959, 1960).[5] He played 240 matches at the USSR championships, scored 37 goals.[4]

After finishing his career as player, he worked at the Krylya Sovetov Moscow until 1972, starting as an assistant coach at his hockey club for four seasons, then managing a sports school. At one time, he served as a hockey referee and sports journalist.[4] Following his complete retirement from hockey, he was responsible for organizing the first sports lotteries in the Soviet Union.[4]

In 1954, he was awarded the title Honoured Master of Sports of the USSR in ice hockey, which holders are unofficially known as inductees of the Russian and Soviet Hockey Hall of Fame.

He was awarded the Medal "For Labour Valour" in 1957, and the Order of Friendship in 1996.

On 15 May 2000, he died in Moscow and later was buried at the Troyekurovskoye Cemetery.[4]

In 2011, Alfred Kuchevsky was posthumously inducted into the International Jewish Sports Hall of Fame.[6]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Jewish Olympic Medalists". Jewishsports.net. Retrieved January 26, 2011. 
  2. ^ Taylor, Paul (2004). Jews and the Olympic Games: The Clash Between Sport and Politics – With a Complete Review of Jewish Olympic Medalists. Sussex Academic Press. 
  3. ^ Rogovskaya, Maria (13 February 2010). "Мы помним: Альфред Кучевский". Championat.com (in Russian). Retrieved 13 July 2016. 
  4. ^ a b c d e Pakhomov, Vladimir (3 July 2000). "Коршун с Соколиной горы". Sovetsky Sport (in Russian). Retrieved 13 July 2016. 
  5. ^ Patrikeyev, Alexey (19 December 1996). "Я мог бы быть Кучаускасом". Sport Express (in Russian) (18). Interview with Alfred Kuchevsky. Retrieved 14 July 2016. 
  6. ^ "Alfred Kuchevsky". International Jewish Sports Hall of Fame. 2011. Retrieved 13 July 2016. 

External links[edit]