Alfred Mundy

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Alfred Miller Mundy (9 January 1809 – 29 March 1877) was an aristocratic English military officer in colonial New South Wales who after leaving the army served in the Legislative Council of South Australia, from 15 June 1843 to 14 May 1849.

History[edit]

Mundy was the third son of Edward Miller Mundy (d. 1834), and grandson of Edward Miller Mundy (18 October 1750 – 18 October 1822) of Shipley Hall, Derbyshire, England, a Tory politician who represented the seat of South Derbyshire.

He enlisted in the army and was in Sydney in November 1827 when he was promoted to Second Lieutenant, 94th Regiment of Foot, later promoted to Lieutenant, 21st Regiment of Foot. He was appointed Magistrate in Tasmania in March 1835.[1] and Justice of the Peace in 1837.[2] He resigned his commission in 1839, but was later commonly referred to as "Lieutenant Mundy".

On 11 July 1839 Mundy, John Bourke and Joseph Hawdon set out from Melbourne for Adelaide, Mundy and Bourke on a light tandem and Hawdon on horseback, following the route taken by Charles Bonney via Portland Bay and the Glenelg River. They arrived in Adelaide exactly a month later, and estimated it could easily be done in half that time.[3]

He joined with Edward Bate Scott and Edward John Eyre, who had a scheme to purchase and transport livestock from Adelaide to the Swan River Colony (now Perth), aboard chartered ships as far as King George's Sound (then the only deepwater harbor in Western Australia) and then drive them overland to Perth. On 30 January 1840 they loaded some stock onto the schooner Minerva and a few days later the remainder onto the barque Cleveland. Eyre sailed aboard Minerva while Mundy was aboard the Cleveland. The stock consisted of 1700 sheep, which included over 1000 ewes and 450 lambs, 6 horses and 100 cattle. They achieved good prices in Perth, and would have made a tidy profit except many sheep and cattle died on the track in Western Australia, ascribed to their eating poisonous plants.[4] On 3 April 1840 Eyre and Mundy were elected honorary members of the W.A. Agricultural Society.[5] They arrived back in Adelaide aboard Minerva in May 1840.

Mundy was appointed acting Clerk of (the Legislative) Council in June 1840[6] and Private Secretary to the newly appointed Governor Grey in May 1841.[7]

He was appointed by the Governor to the Legislative Council 15 June 1843, originally as a non-official appointee, then as Colonial Secretary from 15 June 1848 to 14 June 1849 when he returned to England on leave of absence. His brother Edward Miller Mundy, M.P. for South Derbyshire, had died on 29 January 1849 and Alfred resigned on succeeding to the family estates, which included lucrative coal mines. He was High Sheriff of Derbyshire in 1855, and a J.P. and D.L. for that county and a J.P. for Nottinghamshire. He died while on holiday in Nice.

Family[edit]

Alfred Miller Mundy (9 January 1809 – 29 March 1877) married Jane Hindmarsh (1814 – 8 May 1874) on 5 June 1841. She was the eldest daughter of John Hindmarsh.

  • Nelly Hindmarsh Miller Mundy (1844 – 27 June 1912) married Charles John Addington (17 March 1832 – 11 September 1903) in 1862.
  • Alfred Edward Miller Mundy (28 November 1849 – 1920) married Ellen Mary Palmer-Morewood of Alfreton Hall fame.[8] She deserted him for the young Charles John Chetwynd-Talbot, Earl of Shrewsbury. They divorced in 1881[9] and she later became Lady Shrewsbury.

He inherited the estate of his older brother Edward Miller Mundy (10 November 1800 – 29 January 1849), M.P. for Derbyshire

Sir Robert Miller Mundy KCMG (1813 – 22 March 1892), Lieutenant-Governor of Grenada, was another brother.

Recognition[edit]

  • Mundy Creek, which flows into Lake Eyre South, was named for him by Eyre on 25 August 1840.
  • Lake Mundy in Victoria was named for him by Joseph Holloway in September 1839.[3]
  • Mundy Terrace in Robe was named for him.[10]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Advertising". Launceston Advertiser. 7, (355). Tasmania, Australia. 26 March 1835. p. 4. Retrieved 26 November 2016 – via National Library of Australia.
  2. ^ "Classified Advertising". The Hobart Town Courier. X, (583). Tasmania, Australia. 20 October 1837. p. 2. Retrieved 26 November 2016 – via National Library of Australia.
  3. ^ a b "South Australia". The Sydney Monitor And Commercial Advertiser. XIV, (1408). New South Wales, Australia. 7 October 1839. p. 2. Retrieved 26 November 2016 – via National Library of Australia.
  4. ^ "Introduction of Stock by Eyre and Mundy". The Perth Gazette and Western Australian Journal. VIII, (374). Western Australia. 4 April 1840. p. 2. Retrieved 25 November 2016 – via National Library of Australia.
  5. ^ "Agricultural Society". The Perth Gazette and Western Australian Journal. VIII, (375). Western Australia. 11 April 1840. p. 4. Retrieved 26 November 2016 – via National Library of Australia.
  6. ^ "Government Gazette". Southern Australian. III, (116). South Australia. 30 June 1840. p. 2. Retrieved 26 November 2016 – via National Library of Australia.
  7. ^ "South Australian Extracts". Port Phillip Patriot and Melbourne Advertiser. IV, (212). Victoria, Australia. 3 June 1841. p. 4. Retrieved 26 November 2016 – via National Library of Australia.
  8. ^ "Extraordinary Outrage on a Derbyshire Magistrate". The Argus (Melbourne) (11, 127). Victoria, Australia. 16 February 1882. p. 9. Retrieved 22 November 2016 – via National Library of Australia.
  9. ^ "Mundy v. Mundy". Adelaide Observer. XXXVIII, (2098). South Australia. 17 December 1881. p. 22. Retrieved 22 November 2016 – via National Library of Australia.
  10. ^ "Manning Index of South Australian placenames". State Library of South Australia. Retrieved 22 November 2016.