Ali Jannati

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Ali Jannati
Ali Jannati - Quran Competitions of Khorassan - Nishapur - December 2013 (1).jpg
Jannati in December 2013 , a Quranic Competition in Nishapur
Minister of Culture and Islamic Guidance
In office
15 August 2013 – 19 October 2016
President Hassan Rouhani
Preceded by Mohammad Hosseini
Succeeded by Abbas Salehi (acting)
Ambassador to Kuwait
In office
2006–2010
President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad
Preceded by Jafar Mousavi
Succeeded by Ruhollah Ghahremani
In office
1998–2005
President Mohammad Khatami
Preceded by Reza Mirabian
Succeeded by Jafar Mousavi
Governor of Khorasan Province
In office
1989–1992
President Akbar Hashemi Rafsanjani
Preceded by Amir Abedini
Succeeded by Esmail Mofidi
Governor of Khuzestan Province
In office
1983–1987
President Ali Khamenei
Preceded by Mohammad Forouzandeh
Succeeded by Mohsen Mirdamadi
Personal details
Born 1949 (age 67–68)
Qom, Iran
Nationality Iranian
Political party Moderation and Development Party[1]
Parents Ahmad Jannati (father)
Alma mater Haghani Institute
Religion Islam
Signature
Website Governmental website

Ali Jannati (Persian: علی جنتی‎‎, born 1949) is an Iranian diplomat and politician who was minister of culture from 15 August 2013 until his resignation on 19 October 2016.

Early life and education[edit]

Jannati was born in 1949.[2][3] He is the son of Ayatollah Ahmad Jannati, head of Iranian Guardian Council and Tehran's interim prayer leader.[4] He is a graduate of the Haqqani school in Qom.[5]

Career[edit]

Jannati has had various position in different public institutions of Iran. He began his career in the revolutionary guards as being commander-in-chief of Armed Forces in Khorasan Province.[2][6] Then he was appointed governor general of Khuzestan Province.[6] Then he joined the Islamic Republic of Iran Broadcasting (IRIB), and served as its manager in the Ahvaz branch and as judiciary envoy to IRIB.[6]

He served as deputy minister of culture for international affairs.[6] He was the Iranˈs ambassador to Kuwait from 1998 to 2005 and deputy interior minister for political affairs from 2005 to 2006.[7]

Culture Ministry[edit]

He was nominated as culture and Islamic guidance minister by President Hassan Rouhani on 4 August 2013[4] and was confirmed by the Majlis on 15 August, receiving 234 votes for and 36 votes against.[3] 12 Majlis members were absent in the voting session.[8]

In February 2015, he was harshly criticized by conservatives after the music album To Ra Ey Kohan Boomo Bar Doost Daram was published.[9] He was also criticized by reformists after his functions in cancellation of concerts in some cities. He resigned on 19 October 2016 as part of a cabinet reshuffle, after days of speculations about his dismissal by President Hassan Rouhani.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Seyed Hossein Mousavian (5 July 2013), "The Rise of the Iranian Moderates", Al-Monitor, retrieved 7 December 2016 
  2. ^ a b Alfoneh, Ali (5 August 2013). "All the President's Men: Rouhani's Cabinet" (Policy Brief). Foundation for Defense of Democracies. Retrieved 13 August 2013. 
  3. ^ a b "Iran's new Culture Minister appointed". Iran Book News Agency. 17 August 2013. Retrieved 13 September 2013. 
  4. ^ a b "Iran's New Culture Minister Key Figure in Rouhani's Cabinet". Al Monitor. 2 August 2013. Retrieved 4 August 2013. 
  5. ^ "President Hassan Rouhani's pragmatic conservative, security-intelligence-oriented Cabinet nominations". Iran Politik. 6 August 2013. Retrieved 13 August 2013. 
  6. ^ a b c d "Biography of Jannati, proposed as Minister of Culture and the Islamic Guidance". IRNA. 5 August 2013. Retrieved 16 August 2013. 
  7. ^ "Rouhani's proposed cabinet line-up". Iran Daily. 6 August 2013. Retrieved 16 August 2013. 
  8. ^ "Iranian Parliament Gives Vote of Confidence to Majority of Rouhani's Proposed Ministers". Fars News. 15 August 2013. Retrieved 15 August 2013. 
  9. ^ Esfandiari, Golnaz (February 7, 2015). "Female Singing At Center Of New Attacks Against Iran's Rohani". Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty . Retrieved February 27, 2015.