Alice Echols

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Alice Echols, 2011

Alice Echols is Professor of English, Gender Studies and History at the University of Southern California.[1][2][3]

Education[edit]

Echols received her Bachelor's degree from Macalester College, Minnesota in 1973. She obtained her Master's degree and Doctorate at the University of Michigan in 1980 and 1986 respectively.

Publications[edit]

She authored (with foreword by Ellen Willis), Daring to Be Bad: Radical Feminism in America 1967-1975.;[4] Scars of Sweet Paradise: The Life and Times of Janis Joplin; Shaky Ground: The Sixties and Its Aftershocks; and Hot Stuff: Disco and the Remaking of American Culture.[5] Her book Shortfall: Family Secrets, Financial Collapse, and a Hidden History of American Banking is scheduled to be published in October 2017.[6]

She also wrote a chapter on The Women's Liberation Movement in William McConnell's book The Counterculture Movement of the 1960s.

Selected bibliography[edit]

  • Daring to Be Bad: Radical Feminism in America 1967-1975[4]
  • Shaky Ground: The Sixties and its Aftershocks (2002)[2]
  • Scars of Sweet Paradise: The Life and Times of Janis Joplin (1999)[7]
  • Hot Stuff: Disco and the Remaking of American Culture (2009)[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Charles, Ron (March 8, 2009). "On Campus, Vampires Are Besting the Beats". Washington Post. Retrieved February 23, 2010. 
  2. ^ a b c "Alice Echols [USC Faculty profile]". University of Southern California. Retrieved March 17, 2013.  Retrieved March 17, 2013
  3. ^ "The '80s are back with 'Transformers'". MSNBC. June 29, 2007. Retrieved February 23, 2010. 
  4. ^ a b "Lit up by her own blowtorch". Irish Times. March 25, 2000. Retrieved February 23, 2010. 
  5. ^ Gavin, James (April 1, 2010). "Dance Dance Revolution". The New York Times. The New York Times Company. Retrieved March 19, 2017. 
  6. ^ "Shortfall". Google Books. Retrieved March 19, 2017. 
  7. ^ "Dissecting rock 'n' roll's first female superstar". CNN. May 24, 1999. Archived from the original on 16 February 2010. Retrieved February 23, 2010. 

External links[edit]

Media related to Alice Echols at Wikimedia Commons