Alice Echols

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Alice Echols
Alice Echols 01.jpg
Alice Echols, 2011
Academic background
Alma materMacalester College,
University of Michigan
Academic work
DisciplineHistory
Sub-disciplineContemporary Gender Studies
InstitutionsRutgers University,
University of Southern California

Alice Echols is Professor of History, and the Barbra Streisand Chair of Contemporary Gender Studies at the University of Southern California.[1][2][3]

Education[edit]

Echols received her Bachelor's degree from Macalester College, Minnesota in 1973. She obtained her Master's degree and Doctorate at the University of Michigan in 1980 and 1986 respectively.

Career[edit]

While in graduate school at the University of Michigan, Echols visited the Rubaiyat, a since-closed[4] predominantly gay bar where the "music just stunk." After persuasion from friends, she got a trial gig and then was hired, beginning her career as a Disco DJ.[5]

She was a Visiting Associate Professor at Rutgers University starting in Spring 2007.[2]

Echols began her career as The Barbra Streisand Professor in Contemporary Gender Studies and Professor of English and History at the University of Southern California on August 15, 2011.[2]

Honors and Awards[2][edit]

Honor or Award Date
Rackham Dissertation Grant, The University of Michigan 1984
Center for Gender Research Fellowship 1985
University Fellowship, The University of Michigan 1986
The Horace H. Rackham Distinguished Dissertation Award, The University of Michigan 1987
ACLS Grant-in-Aid Fellowship 1990
Gustavus Meyers Outstanding Book Award-Daring to Be Bad 1990-1991
General Education Course Innovation Award 2006-2007
USC Endowed Professorship, Barbra Streisand Professor of Contemporary Gender Studies and Professor of English, Gender Studies and History 2011-2016
USC Endowed Professorship, Barbra Streisand Professor of Contemporary Gender Studies 2016-

Publications[edit]

She authored Daring to Be Bad: Radical Feminism in America 1967-1975 (with foreword by Ellen Willis);[6] Scars of Sweet Paradise: The Life and Times of Janis Joplin; Shaky Ground: The Sixties and Its Aftershocks; and Hot Stuff: Disco and the Remaking of American Culture.[7] Her book Shortfall: Family Secrets, Financial Collapse, and a Hidden History of American Banking was published by The New Press on October 3, 2017.[8]

She also wrote a chapter on the Women's Liberation Movement in William McConnell's book The Counterculture Movement of the 1960s.[9]

Selected bibliography[edit]

  • Daring to Be Bad: Radical Feminism in America 1967-1975 (with foreword by Ellen Willis)[6]
  • Shaky Ground: The Sixties and its Aftershocks (2002)[2]
  • Scars of Sweet Paradise: The Life and Times of Janis Joplin (1999)[10]
  • Hot Stuff: Disco and the Remaking of American Culture (2009)[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Charles, Ron (March 8, 2009). "On Campus, Vampires Are Besting the Beats". Washington Post. Retrieved February 23, 2010.
  2. ^ a b c d e f "Alice Echols [USC Faculty profile]". University of Southern California. Retrieved March 17, 2013. Retrieved March 17, 2013
  3. ^ "The '80s are back with 'Transformers'". MSNBC. June 29, 2007. Retrieved February 23, 2010.
  4. ^ Farwell, Frank. "A Restaurant Closes, and a Community Mourns". Huffington Post. Retrieved 2 May 2018.
  5. ^ Smallwood, Christine (16 April 2010). "Back Talk: Alice Echols". Retrieved 2 May 2018.
  6. ^ a b "Lit up by her own blowtorch". Irish Times. March 25, 2000. Retrieved February 23, 2010.
  7. ^ Gavin, James (April 1, 2010). "Dance Dance Revolution". The New York Times. The New York Times Company. Retrieved March 19, 2017.
  8. ^ "Shortfall". Google Books. Retrieved 2 May 2018.
  9. ^ McConnell, William S (2004). The counterculture movement of the 1960s. San Diego: Greenhaven Press. Retrieved 2 May 2018.
  10. ^ "Dissecting rock 'n' roll's first female superstar". CNN. May 24, 1999. Archived from the original on 16 February 2010. Retrieved February 23, 2010.

External links[edit]

Media related to Alice Echols at Wikimedia Commons