Alison Van Uytvanck

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Alison Van Uytvanck
Van Uytvanck US16 (6) (29827520446).jpg
Van Uytvanck at the 2016 US Open
Country (sports) Belgium
ResidenceGrimbergen, Belgium
Born (1994-03-26) 26 March 1994 (age 24)
Vilvoorde, Belgium
Height1.79 m (5 ft 10 12 in)
Turned pro2010
PlaysRight-handed (two-handed backhand)
Prize moneyUS$1,592,443
Official websitealisonvanuytvanck.be
Singles
Career record258–163 (61.28%)
Career titles2 WTA, 1 WTA 125K, 11 ITF
Highest rankingNo. 37 (13 August 2018)
Current rankingNo. 38 (20 August 2018)
Grand Slam Singles results
Australian Open1R (2014, 2015, 2016, 2018)
French OpenQF (2015)
Wimbledon4R (2018)
US Open1R (2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018)
Doubles
Career record30–30
Career titles1 WTA, 1 ITF
Highest rankingNo. 106 (26 October 2015)
Current rankingNo. 557 (16 April 2018)
Grand Slam Doubles results
Australian Open1R (2016)
French Open1R (2018)
Wimbledon3R (2015)
US Open1R (2014, 2015, 2018)
Team competitions
Fed Cup9–9
Last updated on: 16 April 2018.

Alison Van Uytvanck (Dutch pronunciation: [vɑn ˈœy̯tfɑŋk]; born 26 March 1994) is a Belgian professional tennis player.

Van Uytvanck has won two international & one 125K title on the WTA tour, as well as nine singles titles and one doubles title on the ITF tour in her career. On 26 October 2015, she reached her best singles ranking of world No. 41, and her best doubles ranking of world No. 106.

Personal life[edit]

Van Uytvanck was born in the small town of Grimbergen to René Van Uytvanck and Krista Laemers. She started playing tennis at age 5 when her older brother Sean introduced her to the game. She also has a twin brother named Brett. Van Uytvanck graduated high school at Sint-Donatus in Merchtem. As a junior, she alternated between training with local coach Sacha Katsnelson and the Flemish Tennis Association, where she has been coached by Ann DeVries. Her tennis idol is Roger Federer, and she also admires compatriot Kim Clijsters.[1][2] Van Uytvanck is openly lesbian, and is in a relationship with fellow Belgian tennis player Greet Minnen as of 2018.[3]

Career[edit]

2011[edit]

In 2011, she won 4 ITF singles titles in Vale Do Lobo (Portugal), Dijon (France), Edinburgh and Sunderland. She also reached the final in Tessenderlo (Belgium) where she lost to Anna-Lena Grönefeld.

She took part in the 2011 Brussels Open where she entered as a qualifier by defeating Margalita Chakhnashvili 6–3, 6–2 (1st round of qualifying draw), Laura Siegemund, 2–6, 6–4, 6–3 (2nd round of qualifying draw) and Hsieh Su-wei, 6–4, 2–6, 6–4 (3rd round of qualifying draw). She faced Patty Schnyder in the 1st round of the main draw and defeated her 6–3, 2–6, 6–2. In her next match against a compatriot, the Belgian Yanina Wickmayer, she ultimately lost 7–6(2), 6–4.[4]

She also qualified for the main draw at 's-Hertogenbosch, where she lost to Alexandra Dulgheru.

2012[edit]

In 2012, she won a fifth ITF singles title in Glasgow, and reached the final in Kaarst (Germany). In February, she debuted in the Fed Cup against Serbia, where she was chosen by coach Ann Devries over Kirsten Flipkens in the deciding doubles rubber. Partnering Yanina Wickmayer, they lost the match (and by extension, the tie) in 3 sets.[5]

She took part in the 2012 Brussels Open where she received a wild card into the main draw. She defeated Ksenia Pervak in her first round match and then beat Chanelle Scheepers in three sets to advance to her first WTA quarterfinals, where she was defeated by top seed and world No. 3 Agnieszka Radwańska in straight sets. Van Uytvanck went on, having more success on the ITF circuit.

2013[edit]

In 2013, Van Uytvanck won her first WTA title by winning the 2013 OEC Taipei WTA Ladies Open in which she defeated Dinah Pfizenmaier in the semi-finals and compatriot Yanina Wickmayer 6–4, 6–2 in the final.

2014[edit]

She played in the main draw of all four of the Grand Slam tournaments and reached the second round at Wimbledon for the first time in her career.

2015–16: French Open quarterfinals and injury[edit]

In 2015, she reached the quarterfinal of the French Open which she lost in two sets to Timea Bacsinszky. She reached her career-high ranking of No. 41 later that year, in October. However, a growth on her right ankle resulted in her missing a number of tournaments in the 2016 clay court season, including the 2016 French Open, and her failure to defend her quarterfinalist points from 2015 caused her to fall out of the Top 100 in June 2016.[6]

2017[edit]

After long injury hiatus Van Uytvanck won her first title of her career at Tournoi de Quebec beating Timea Babos 5-7, 6-4, 6-1.

2018[edit]

Van Uytvanck won her second title in February at Hungarian Ladies Open defeating Dominika Cibulková in a long three-set battle in the final. She eliminated defending champion Garbine Muguruza in the second round of Wimbledon, losing just three games after dropping the first set 5–7. It was her first win over a top 10 opponent and arguably the best match performance of her career so far.[7] After a win over Anett Kontaveit in the third round, she lost in the fourth round to Daria Kasatkina.[8]

Equipment and apparel[edit]

Van Uytvanck previously played with the Prince O3 Tour racquet. She now plays with the Snauwaert Grinta 100 lite, a 100 square inch tennis racquet with 22 mm dual taper beam, 285 g weight. She has a contract with the South Korean sporting goods company Fila apparel.

WTA career finals[edit]

Singles: 2 (2 titles)[edit]

Legend
Grand Slam tournaments (0–0)
WTA Tour Championships (0–0)
Premier Mandatory & Premier 5 (0–0)
Premier (0–0)
International (2–0)
Titles by Surface
Hard (1–0)
Grass (0–0)
Clay (0–0)
Carpet (1–0)
Result W–L Date Tournament Tier Surface Opponents Score
Win 1–0 Sep 2017 Tournoi de Quebec, Canada International Carpet (i) Hungary Tímea Babos 5–7, 6–4, 6–1
Win 2–0 Feb 2018 Hungarian Ladies Open, Hungary International Hard (i) Slovakia Dominika Cibulková 6–3, 3–6, 7–5

Doubles: 1 (1 title, 1 runner-up)[edit]

Legend
Grand Slam tournaments (0–0)
WTA Tour Championships (0–0)
Premier Mandatory & Premier 5 (0–0)
Premier (0–1)
International (1–0)
Titles by Surface
Hard (1–1)
Grass (0–0)
Clay (0–0)
Carpet (0–0)
Result W–L Date Tournament Tier Surface Partner Opponents Score
Loss 0–1 Feb 2015 Diamond Games, Belgium Premier Hard (i) Belgium An-Sophie Mestach Spain Anabel Medina Garrigues
Spain Arantxa Parra Santonja
4–6, 6–3, [5–10]
Win 1–1 Oct 2018 Luxembourg Open, Luxembourg International Hard (i) Belgium Greet Minnen Belarus Vera Lapko
Luxembourg Mandy Minella
7–6(7–3), 6–2

WTA 125K Series finals[edit]

Singles: 1 (1 title)[edit]

Result W–L Date Tournament Tier Surface Opponent Score
Win 1–0 Nov 2013 Taipei Open, Taiwan 125K Carpet (i) Belgium Yanina Wickmayer 6–4, 6–2

Doubles: 1 (1 runner–up)[edit]

Result W–L Date Tournament Tier Surface Partner Opponents Score
Loss 0–1 Nov 2013 Taipei Open, Taiwan 125K Carpet (i) Germany Anna-Lena Friedsam France Caroline Garcia
Kazakhstan Yaroslava Shvedova
3–6, 3–6

ITF Circuit finals[edit]

Singles: 18 (11–7)[edit]

Legend
$100,000 tournaments
$75,000 tournaments
$50,000 tournaments
$25,000 tournaments
$10,000 tournaments
Finals by surface
Hard (8–5)
Clay (2–1)
Grass (0–1)
Carpet (0–0)
Outcome No. Date Tournament Surface Opponent Score
Winner 1. 13 February 2011 Vale do Lobo, Portugal Hard Bulgaria Elitsa Kostova 6–3, 4–6, 6–2
Winner 2. 13 March 2011 Dijon, France Hard France Claire Feuerstein 6–2, 6–3
Runner-up 1. 23 April 2011 Tessenderlo, Belgium Clay (i) Germany Anna-Lena Grönefeld 3–6, 5–7
Winner 3. 8 May 2011 Edinburgh, Great Britain Clay Poland Justyna Jegiołka 6–7 (5–7) , 6–4, 6–2
Winner 4. 6 November 2011 Sunderland, Great Britain Hard (i) United Kingdom Tara Moore 6–4, 6–1
Winner 5. 15 January 2012 Glasgow, Great Britain Hard (i) United Kingdom Francesca Stephenson 6–3, 6–1
Runner-up 2. 29 January 2012 Kaarst, Germany Hard (i) Germany Dinah Pfizenmaier 4–6, 4–6
Runner-up 3. 21 October 2012 Glasgow, Great Britain Hard (i) United Kingdom Samantha Murray 3–6, 6–2, 3–6
Winner 6. 11 November 2012 Equeurdreville, France Hard (i) France Julie Coin 6–1, 3–6, 6–3
Winner 7. 27 January 2013 Andrezieux-Boutheon, France Hard (i) Croatia Ana Vrljić 6–1, 6–4
Runner-up 4. 24 March 2013 Sunderland, Great Britain Hard (i) Germany Anna-Lena Friedsam 2–6, 6–7 (4–7)
Winner 8. 28 April 2013 Chiasso, Switzerland Clay Poland Katarzyna Kawa 7–6 (7–2) , 6–3
Winner 9. 21 September 2013 Shrewsbury, Great Britain Hard (i) Russia Marta Sirotkina 7–5, 6–1
Runner-up 5. 28 September 2013 Loughborough, Great Britain Hard (i) Germany Anna-Lena Friedsam 3–6, 0–6
Winner 10. 17 July 2016 Stockton, United States Hard Russia Anastasia Pivovarova 6–3, 3–6, 6–2
Winner 11. 2 October 2016 Las Vegas, United States Hard United States Sofia Kenin 3–6, 7–6 (7–4) , 6–2
Runner-up 6. 25 June 2017 Ilkley, United Kingdom Grass Slovakia Magdaléna Rybáriková 5–7, 6–7(3–7)
Runner-up 7. 29 October 2017 Poitiers, France Hard (i) Romania Mihaela Buzărnescu 4–6, 2–6

Doubles (2–2)[edit]

Legend
$100,000 tournaments
$75,000 tournaments
$50,000 tournaments
$25,000 tournaments
$10,000 tournaments
Finals by surface
Hard (2–2)
Clay (0–0)
Grass (0–0)
Carpet (0–0)
Outcome No. Date Tournament Surface Partner Opponents Score
Runner-up 1. 16 August 2010 Westende, Belgium Hard Russia Irina Khromacheva Netherlands Quirine Lemoine
Netherlands Demi Schuurs
6-3 4-6 [4-10]
Runner-up 2. 5 March 2012 Dijon, France Hard (i) Russia Yana Sizikova Latvia Diāna Marcinkēviča
Greece Despina Papamichail
5–7, 6–7(7–9)
Winner 1. 25 March 2013 Croissy-Beaubourg, France Hard (i) Germany Anna-Lena Friedsam France Stéphanie Foretz
Czech Republic Eva Hrdinová
6–3, 6–4
Winner 2. 11 July 2016 Stockton, United States Hard Czech Republic Kristýna Plíšková United States Robin Anderson
United States Maegan Manasse
6–2, 6–3

Singles performance timeline[edit]

Tournament 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 W–L
Grand Slam Tournaments
Australian Open A 1R 1R 1R A 1R 0–4
French Open A 1R QF A 2R 2R 6–4
Wimbledon Q2 2R 1R 1R 1R 4R 4–5
US Open Q3 1R 1R 1R 1R 1R 0–5
Win–loss 0–0 1–4 4–4 0–3 1–3 4–4 10–18
Premier Mandatory & Premier 5
Qatar / Dubai[1] A A A A A A 0–0
Indian Wells Open A 1R 2R 1R Q1 1R 1–4
Miami Open A Q1 2R 1R Q2 2R 2–3
Madrid Open A Q1 A A A 1R 0–1
Italian Open A A A A A 2R 1–1
Canadian Open A A 1R A Q2 2R 1–2
Cincinnati Open A Q1 A Q1 Q1 Q1 0–0
Pan Pacific / Wuhan[2] A 1R A A A A 0–0
China Open A Q2 2R A A 1R 1–2
Win–Loss 0–0 0–1 3–4 0–2 0–0 3–6 6–13
Career statistics
Year-end ranking 129 80 42 124 75

Wins over top-10 players[edit]

# Player Rank Event Surface Round Score
2018
1. Spain Garbiñe Muguruza No. 3 Wimbledon, London, United Kingdom Grass 2nd Round 5–7, 6–2, 6–1

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Biography". Alison Van Uytvanck. Retrieved 27 February 2018.
  2. ^ "Alison Van Uytvanck". Samsung Open. Retrieved 27 February 2018.
  3. ^ "WTA love match: Alison Van Uytvanck and Greet Minnen". Women's Tennis Blog. Retrieved 6 July 2018.
  4. ^ Alison Van Uytvanck in the Women's Tennis Association. Retrieved on 27 March 2014.
  5. ^ "Fed Cup Result Page".
  6. ^ [1]
  7. ^ "Van Uytvanck on Muguruza upset: 'I was in the zone'". 5 July 2018. Retrieved 9 July 2018.
  8. ^ "Kasatkina makes Van Uytvanck comeback to move into first Wimbledon QF". 9 July 2018. Retrieved 9 July 2018.

External links[edit]