Alister Beal

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Alister Beal
Born 21 March 1875
Died 18 October 1962 (1962-10-19) (aged 87)
Allegiance United Kingdom United Kingdom
Service/branch Naval Ensign of the United Kingdom.svg Royal Navy
Years of service 1894–1926
Rank Vice Admiral
Commands held HMS Weymouth
HMS Chatham
New Zealand Division
Battles/wars World War I
Awards Commander of the Order of the British Empire
Companion of the Order of St Michael and St George
Distinguished Service Order

Vice Admiral Alister Francis Beal CB CMG DSO (21 March 1875 – 18 October 1962) was a Royal Navy officer who became Commodore Commanding the New Zealand Division.

Naval career[edit]

Beal joined the Royal Navy as a 13 year old on 15 July 1888.[1] He was commissioned as a midshipman in 1894[2] and served in World War I becoming Commanding Officer of the cruiser HMS Weymouth in February 1918[3] and being awarded the DSO for his services at the bombardment of Durazzo in October 1918.[4] He went on to Command HMS Chatham (which had been lent to the New Zealand Station) in July 1923[3] before becoming Commodore Commanding the New Zealand Division in August 1923 until he retired in 1926.[5] He was appointed CB in the 1926 Birthday Honours[6] and promoted to Vice-Admiral while on the retired list.[7]

Family[edit]

He was married to Mabel Constance Annie Youl.[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Royal Naval Officers' Service Records Index, 1756-1931
  2. ^ The London Gazette: (Supplement) no. 26667. p. 5406. 1 October 1895. Retrieved 31 December 2011.
  3. ^ a b Royal Navy Warships
  4. ^ The London Gazette: (Supplement) no. 31236. p. 3589. 14 March 1919. Retrieved 31 December 2011.
  5. ^ Senior Royal Navy Appointments
  6. ^ The London Gazette: (Supplement) no. 33179. p. 4403. 2 July 1926. Retrieved 31 December 2011.
  7. ^ Royal Navy Flag Officers 1904-1945
  8. ^ Marriages Sydney Morning Herald, 13 August 1926
Military offices
Preceded by
Alan Hotham
Commander-in-Chief, New Zealand Division
1923–1926
Succeeded by
George Swabey