Alita Román

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Alita Román
Alita Román.jpg
Born (1912-08-24)August 24, 1912
Buenos Aires, Argentina
Died April 15, 1989(1989-04-15) (aged 76)
Years active 1934–1983

Alita Blanca Barchigia better known as Alita Román (August 24, 1912 - April 15, 1989), was an Argentine film actress of the Golden Age of Argentine Cinema (1940–1960).[1] She appeared in nearly 50 films between 1934 and 1982 and was a sought-after supporting actress, winning the Best Supporting Actress from the Argentine Academy of Cinematography Arts and Sciences for her work in Concierto de almas and playing in many box-office hits. She also performed in live theater and on television and radio.

Biography[edit]

Alita Blanca Barchigia was born 24 August 1912 in Buenos Aires, Argentina.[2] She began her career in theater in the early 1930s, debuting with Narciso Ibáñez Menta and later joining the company of Lola Membrives.[citation needed] Her film debut was in a 1934 Sono Film production, Riachuelo, directed by Luis Moglia Barth starring Luis Sandrini and Héctor Calcaño.[3] Her next film La Barra Mendocina (1935) written and directed by Mario Soffici,[4] was followed by El alma del bandoneón (1935) with Libertad Lamarque and Alicia Barrié.[5] Then in 1937, she made Mateo, written and directed by Daniel Tinayre and starring Luis Arata.[6]

Simultaneously, she was working in radio. She worked with a group of actors on a program called "Compañía Juvenil de Arte" (Youth Art Troupe) which aired on Radio Splendid.[7] One of the programs they aired was a radio drama called Reviviendo la emoción de los más bellos poemas, on which Román, along with Elda Christie, Inés Edmonson, Delia Garcés, Pepe Herrero, Queca Herrero, Paul Lagarde, and Hugo Pimentel, recited poems.[8]

Her first major success came with Mujeres que trabajan (1938), which starred Mecha Ortiz, Pepita Serrador, Alicia Barrié, Sabina Olmos, Niní Marshall,[9] Hilda Sour, Mary Paretz and Tito Luisardo, along with others. The film was Marshall's debut, after having done radio, and she was particularly praised, though all of the cast members' performances were rated highly.[10] Román was often described as very photogenic.[9][11][12] Román followed that success with Mi suegra es una fiera (1939), under the direction Luis Bayón Herrera with Olinda Bozán and Paquito Busto;[13] and El Loco Serenata (1939) directed by Luis Saslavsky for Argentina Sono Film and starring with Pepe Arias, which earned her a favorable review in the New York Times.[14] In 1942, she made Ceniza al viento directed by Luis Saslavsky and starring Berta Singerman, María Duval, Luis Arata, Santiago Arrieta, and Tita Merello, among others; and Concierto de almas directed by Alberto de Zavalía and starring Delia Garcés.[15] Román won Best Supporting Actress from the Argentine Academy of Cinematography Arts and Sciences for her work in Concierto de almas.[16]

She also did theater in the 1940s, starring with Luis Arata in Cada cual a su juego in 1944 with Arata’s Company which was performing at the Teatro Buenos Aires.[17] In 1945, Román appeared in a musical comedy Los maridos engañan de 7 a 9 staged by "The Argentine Company of Comedy and Musical Comedy of Gloria Guzmán and Juan Carlos Thorry". The play opened in March at the Teatro Astral in Buenos Aires to excellent reviews.[18] She then performed in Delia Garcés' farewell production in Argentina, Claudia by Rose Franken, which played at the Odeón Theater in 1945.[19]

From the late 1940s, she was a sought–after supporting actress, and participated in many award-winning films. In 1951, she made Los isleros (1951) directed by Lucas Demare and starring Tita Merello.[20] Los isleros was submitted to the Cannes Film Festival as Argentina's entry and it was awarded a Silver Condor Award for Best Film, Best Director and Best Actress to Merello for 1952 from the Argentine Film Critics Association.[21] In 1956, Román was in Graciela,[22] which starred Chilean actor Lautaro Murúa and earned him the 1957 Silver Condor Award for Best Actor.[23]

In 1954 she starred in the television program Mariquita y su teléfono, with a phone as the only other "actor".[24] In 1960 she appeared in the Antonio Cunill Jr. film Los Acusados and[25] in 1969 she was in the comedy El Profesor hippie alongside actors such as Luis Sandrini and Roberto Escalada.[26] From the mid-1960s, she worked in television series such as Ella, la gata (1967),[27] Nino, las cosas simples de la vida (1971),[28] Novia de vacaciones (1979),[29] Trampa para un soñador (1980)[30] and made her last performances in Aprender a vivir (1981)[31] and Los días contados (1983).[32] She made her last two movies Días de ilusión,[33] and then Toto Paniagua in 1980.[34]

She died on 15 April 1989 in Buenos Aires.[2]

Filmography[edit]

Film[edit]

Television[edit]

  • Mariquita y su teléfono (1954)[24]
  • Ella... la gata (1967) (telenovela)[27]
  • La hora Fate (1960-1962) Episode: "Mujercitas"[35]
  • Gran teatro universal (1970) Episode: "La loca de la casa"[36]
  • Soledad, un destino sin amor (1970-1971) (telenovela)[37]
  • Ciclo de teatro argentino (1971) Episode: "Rostro Perdido"[38]
  • Alta Comedia (1971) Episode: "Recuerdo a Mamá"[39]
  • Nino, las cosas simples de la vida (1971/1972)[28]
  • La selva es mujer (1972-1973) (telenovela)[40]
  • Amar al ladrón (1973) (telenovela)[41]
  • Vermouth de teatro argentino (1974) Episode: "Historia de mi esquina"[42]
  • Novia de vacaciones (1979) (telenovela)[29]
  • Dos y Bartolo (1980)[43]
  • Trampa para un soñador (1980/1981) (telenovela)[30]
  • Quiero gritar tu nombre (1981)[44]
  • Aprender a vivir (1981-1982)[31]
  • Área peligrosa (1982) (mini-series)[45]
  • Los días contados (1983) (telenovela)[32]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Alita Román at the Internet Movie Database.
  2. ^ a b "Alita Román". Cine Nacional (in Spanish). Buenos Aires, Argentina: Cine Nacional. Retrieved 11 June 2015. 
  3. ^ Cavanagh, Cecilia (2006). La búsqueda de la nostalgia: afiches cinematográficos argentinos, 1934-1964 (in Spanish). Buenas Aires, Argentina: Pontificia Universidad Católica Argentina. p. 22. Retrieved 11 June 2015. 
  4. ^ Calistro, Mariano (1978). Reportaje al cine argentino: los pioneros del sonoro (in Spanish). Buenos Aires, Argentina: ANESA. p. 417. Retrieved 11 June 2015. 
  5. ^ Sosa de Newton, Lily (2007). Las argentinas y su historia (in Spanish) (1 ed.). Buenos Aires, República Argentina: Feminaria Editora. p. 287. ISBN 978-987-21999-4-4. Retrieved 11 June 2015. 
  6. ^ Martín, Jorge Abel (1980). Cine argentino '79 (in Spanish). Buenos Aires, Argentina: Corregidor. p. 48. 
  7. ^ "Blanco Pazos & Clemente (2004)", p 56
  8. ^ "Mario C. Lugones". Cine Papaya (in Spanish). Chile: Cine Papaya. Retrieved 11 June 2015. 
  9. ^ a b Posadas, Abel (1993). Niní Marshall : desde un ayer lejano (in Spanish). Buenos Aires: Ediciones Colihue. pp. 38–40. ISBN 950-581-242-6. Retrieved 11 June 2015. 
  10. ^ Finkielman, Jorge (2004). The film industry in Argentina: an illustrated cultural history (in Spanish). Jefferson, NC [u.a.]: McFarland. pp. 225–226. ISBN 978-0-7864-1628-8. 
  11. ^ Blanco Pazos, Roberto; Clemente, Raúl (2004). De la fuga a la fuga: diccionario de films policiales; [el policial en el cine argentino] (in Spanish). Buenos Aires: Ed. Corregidor. pp. 21, 24. ISBN 950-05-1528-8. Retrieved 11 June 2015. 
  12. ^ "Los Isleros". Criterio (in Spanish). Argentina: Editorial Surgo. 24 (1136–1146): 313. 1951. 
  13. ^ Neveleff, Julio; Monforte, Miguel (2008). Mar del Plata 100 años de cine (1908-2008) (in Spanish). Bs. As. [i.e. Buenos Aires]: Corregidor. p. 104. ISBN 978-950-05-1779-9. Retrieved 11 June 2015. 
  14. ^ Crisler, B. R. (April 22, 1940). "At the Radio Teatro Hispano". New York City, New York: The New York Times. Retrieved 11 June 2015. 
  15. ^ Núbila, Domingo di (1998). La época de oro (in Spanish) (Ed. actual. y ampl. ed.). Buenos Aires: Ed. del Jilguero. p. 422. ISBN 9879578651. Retrieved 11 June 2015. 
  16. ^ "1942 Premios Anuales". Academia de Cine (in Spanish). Buenos Aires: Academia de las Artes y Ciencias Cinematográficas de la Argentina. 31 May 2014. Retrieved 16 June 2015. 
  17. ^ Pellettieri, Osvaldo (1997). Pirandello y el teatro argentino : (1920 - 1990) (in Spanish). Buenos Aires: Ed. Galerna. p. 67. ISBN 950-556-369-8. Retrieved 11 June 2015. 
  18. ^ de Maria y Campos, Armando. "Las dos representaciones en México de Los maridos engañan de 7 a 9". Resena Historica Teatro Mexico 2021 (in Spanish). Mexico City, Mexico: Consejo Nacional para la Cultura y las Artes. Retrieved 11 June 2015. 
  19. ^ Famá Hernández, Roberto (16 June 2010). ""Claudia" con Delia Garcés en el Teatro Odeón (año 1945)". Colecciones Teatrales (in Spanish). Argentina: Colecciones Teatrales. Retrieved 11 June 2015. 
  20. ^ "Cine". Visión: revista internacional (in Spanish). 40 (2). 1972. Retrieved 11 June 2015. 
  21. ^ Rist, Peter H. (2014). Historical dictionary of South American cinema. Lanham, Maryland: Rowman & Littlefield. p. 204. ISBN 978-0-8108-6082-7. Retrieved 11 June 2015. 
  22. ^ Cowie, Peter (1967). Variety International Film Guide. London: Tantivy Press. p. 34. Retrieved 11 June 2015. 
  23. ^ Vieites, María del Carmen; Aguilar, Gonzalo Moisés (2002). Leopoldo Torre Nilsson: una estética de la decadencia (in Spanish). Buenos Aires: Grupo Editor Altamira. p. 128. ISBN 9789879423967. 
  24. ^ a b Nielsen, Jorge; Vega, Hugo F. (2004). La magia de la televisión argentina : cierta historia documentada (in Spanish) (1. ed.). Ciudad Autónoma de Buenos Aires, Argentina: Ediciones del Jilguero. p. 75. ISBN 987-9416-06-6. Retrieved 11 June 2015. 
  25. ^ "Posters - Argentina - Acusados, Los". Difilm-argentina (in Spanish). Buenos Aires, Argentina: Archive DiFilm. Retrieved 11 June 2015. 
  26. ^ "El profesor hippie (1969)". Cine Nacional (in Spanish). Buenos Aires, Argentina: Cine Nacional. Retrieved 11 June 2015. 
  27. ^ a b "Historia de las Telenovelas en Argentina". Historia de la TV Argentina (in Spanish). Argentina: Historia de la TV Argentina. 5 April 2012. Retrieved 11 June 2015. 
  28. ^ a b "Nino, las cosas simples de la vida (1971/1972)". Nuestros Actores (in Spanish). Argentina: Nuestros Actores. Retrieved 11 June 2015. 
  29. ^ a b "Novia de vacaciones (1979)". Nuestros Actores (in Spanish). Argentina: Nuestros Actores. Retrieved 11 June 2015. 
  30. ^ a b "Trampa para un soñador (1980/1981)". Nuestros Actores (in Spanish). Argentina: Nuestros Actores. Retrieved 11 June 2015. 
  31. ^ a b "Aprender a vivir (1981/1982)". Nuestros Actores (in Spanish). Argentina: Nuestros Actores. Retrieved 11 June 2015. 
  32. ^ a b "Los días contados (1983)". Nuestros Actores (in Spanish). Argentina: Nuestros Actores. Retrieved 11 June 2015. 
  33. ^ "Revistas e Artigos Jornalísticos". ACCEDER (in Spanish). Buenos Aires, Argentina: Ministério de Cultura. Retrieved 11 June 2015. 
  34. ^ "Toto Paniagua". ACCEDER (in Spanish). Buenos Aires, Argentina: Ministério de Cultura. Retrieved 11 June 2015. 
  35. ^ "La hora Fate (1960/1962)". Nuestros Actores (in Spanish). Argentina: Nuestros Actores. Retrieved 11 June 2015. 
  36. ^ "Gran teatro universal (1970)". Nuestros Actores (in Spanish). Argentina: Nuestros Actores. Retrieved 11 June 2015. 
  37. ^ "Soledad, un destino sin amor (1970/1971)". Nuestros Actores (in Spanish). Argentina: Nuestros Actores. Retrieved 11 June 2015. 
  38. ^ "Ciclo de teatro argentino (1971)". Nuestros Actores (in Spanish). Argentina: Nuestros Actores. Retrieved 11 June 2015. 
  39. ^ "Alta Comedia (1971)". Nuestros Actores (in Spanish). Argentina: Nuestros Actores. Retrieved 11 June 2015. 
  40. ^ "La selva es mujer (1972/1973)". Nuestros Actores (in Spanish). Argentina: Nuestros Actores. Retrieved 11 June 2015. 
  41. ^ "Amar al ladrón (1973)". Nuestros Actores (in Spanish). Argentina: Nuestros Actores. Retrieved 11 June 2015. 
  42. ^ "Vermouth de teatro argentino (1974)". Nuestros Actores (in Spanish). Argentina: Nuestros Actores. Retrieved 11 June 2015. 
  43. ^ "Dos y Bartolo (1980)". Nuestros Actores (in Spanish). Argentina: Nuestros Actores. Retrieved 11 June 2015. 
  44. ^ "Quiero gritar tu nombre (1981)". Nuestros Actores (in Spanish). Argentina: Nuestros Actores. Retrieved 11 June 2015. 
  45. ^ "Área peligrosa (1982)". Nuestros Actores (in Spanish). Argentina: Nuestros Actores. Retrieved 11 June 2015. 

External links[edit]