Alkali metal oxide

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A sample of sodium peroxide.

The alkali metals react with oxygen to form several different compounds: suboxides, oxides, peroxides, superoxides, and ozonides. They all react violently with water.

Alkali metal suboxides[edit]

Structure of undecacaesium trioxide.

Alkali metal oxides[edit]

Crystal structure of rubidium oxide.
  • Lithium oxide (Li2O) is the lightest alkali metal oxide and a white solid. It melts at 1570 °C.
  • Sodium oxide (Na2O) is a white solid that melts at 1132 °C and decomposes at 1950 °C. It is a component of glass.
  • Potassium oxide (K2O) is a pale yellow solid that decomposes at 350 °C.
  • Rubidium oxide (Rb2O) is a yellow solid that melts at 500 °C.
  • Caesium oxide (Cs2O) is a yellow-orange solid that melts at 490 °C.

Alkali metal peroxides[edit]

Crystal structure of sodium peroxide.

Alkali metal superoxides[edit]

Crystal structure of potassium superoxide.

Alkali metal ozonides[edit]

  • Lithium ozonide (LiO3) is a red solid which is produced from caesium ozonide via an ion-exchange process.
  • Sodium ozonide (NaO3) is a red solid which is produced from caesium ozonide via an ion-exchange process.[1]
  • Potassium ozonide (KO3) is a dark red solid which is produced when potassium is burned in ozone or exposed to air for years.
  • Rubidium ozonide (RbO3) is a dark red solid which is produced when rubidium is burned in ozone.
  • Caesium ozonide (CsO3) is a dark red solid which is produced when caesium is burned in ozone.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Klein, W.; Armbruster, K.; Jansen, M. (1998). "Synthesis and crystal structure determination of sodium ozonide". Chemical Communications (6): 707–708. doi:10.1039/a708570b.  edit
  2. ^ F.A. Cotton and G. Wilkinson "Advanced Inorganic Chemistry", 5th edition (1988), p.462