All Hail the Power of Jesus' Name

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All Hail the Power of Jesus' Name
Perronet e.jpg
GenreHymn
TextEdward Perronet
Meter8.6.8.6.8.6
Melody"Coronation" (Holden), "Miles Lane" (Shrubsole), "Diadem" (Ellor)
Published1779 (1779)

"All Hail the Power of Jesus' Name" is a Christian hymn.

The hymn has been called the "National Anthem of Christendom".[1] The lyrics, written by Edward Perronet, first appeared in the November, 1779 issue of the Gospel Magazine, which was edited by the author of "Rock of Ages", Augustus Toplady.

The song was heavily altered for the Unitarian hymnal, which was also licensed to the hymnal of the Unity Church: "All Hail the Power of Truth to Save from Error's Binding Thrall."

Bing Crosby included the hymn in his 1951 album Beloved Hymns.

Text[edit]

The original had eight stanza,[2] but it is often shortened in modern hymnals; for example:[3]

1 All hail the power of Jesus' name!
Let angels prostrate fall.
Bring forth the royal diadem,

Refrain:
and crown him, crown him, crown him,
crown him Lord of all!

2 O seed of Israel's chosen race
now ransomed from the fall,
hail him who saves you by his grace, Refrain

3 Let every tongue and every tribe
responsive to his call,
to him all majesty ascribe, Refrain

4 Oh, that with all the sacred throng
we at his feet may fall!
We'll join the everlasting song. Refrain

Tunes[edit]

The hymn is sung to a variety of tunes. "Coronation" (Oliver Holden, 1793) is most common in the United States.[3][4]


<< <<
\new Staff { \clef treble \time 4/4 \partial 4 \key f \major \set Staff.midiInstrument = "church organ" \set Score.tempoHideNote = ##t \override Score.BarNumber  #'transparent = ##t
  \relative c' 
  << { c4 | f f a a | g f g a | g f a g | f2. \bar"" \break
  g4 | a g f a | c8([ bes]) a( g) a4 c | c2 c | d c4( b) | c2. \bar"" \break
  a4 | c a f a | g8([ f]) g( a) g4 f | c'2 bes | a4.( bes8 g4) g | f2. \bar"|." } \\
  { c4 | c c f f | e d e f | e f f e | c2.
  e4 | f e c f | g e f e | f2 g | f e4( d) | e2.
  f4 | f f c f | e8([ d]) e8( f) e4 f | f2 f | f2. e4 | c2. } >>
}
\new Lyrics \lyricmode {
All4 hail the pow'r of Je -- sus' name!
Let an -- gels pros -- trate fall;2.
Bring4 forth the roy -- al di -- a -- dem
And crown2 Him Lord of all.2.
Bring4 forth the roy -- al di -- a -- dem
And crown2 Him Lord of all.2.
}
\new Staff { \clef bass \key f \major \set Staff.midiInstrument = "church organ"
  \relative c
  << { e4 | a a c c | c a c c | c a c bes | a2.
  c4 | c c f, c' | c c c c | a2 g | a g | g2.
  f4 | a c c c | c g c a | c2 d | c2. bes4 | a2. } \\
  { c,4 | f, f f' f | c d c a | c d c c | f,2.
  c'4 | f c a f' | e c f c | f2 e | d g, | c2. 
  f4 | f f a f | c c c d | a2 bes | c2. c4 | f,2. } >>
}
>> >>
\layout { indent = #0 }
\midi { \tempo 4 = 90 }

"Miles Lane" (William Shrubsole, 1779) was originally associated with the tune in Britain.[2] It first appeared in the Gospel Magazine (November 1779) as a three part arrangement with a figured bass. The "striking refrain" originally began as a series of ascending exclamations by solo voices, but this was later fully harmonised in four parts in Hymns Ancient and Modern and endures as such in modern hymnals.[5][6]

\transpose a c {
<< <<
\new Staff { \clef treble \time 4/4 \partial 4 \key a \major \set Staff.midiInstrument = "church organ" \set Score.tempoHideNote = ##t \override Score.BarNumber  #'transparent = ##t
  \relative e'' 
  << { e4 | a a a b | cis b8( a) b4 \breathe e, | fis e8( d) cis4 b | a2. \bar"||" \break
  e'4 | a a a b | cis b8( a) b4 \breathe e, | a2 a | \break
  cis cis | e e \bar"||" cis d | cis b | a2. \bar"|." } \\
  { cis,4 | e fis e e | e4. dis8 e4 e | d8([ cis]) b( a) a4 gis | a2.
  cis8( b) | a4 fis' e d | cis dis e e | e2 e |
  e a | a4( gis8 fis) gis2 | e fis | e e4( d) | cis2. } >>
}
\new Lyrics \lyricmode {
All4 hail the power of Je -- su's name;
Let an -- gels pro -- strate fall;2.
Bring4 forth the ro -- yal di -- a -- dem
To crown2 him, crown him, crown him,
crown him Lord of all.2.
}
\new Staff { \clef bass \key a \major \set Staff.midiInstrument = "church organ"
  \relative c'
  << { a'4 | cis d cis b | a b8( fis) gis4 a | a gis8( fis) e4 e8( d) | cis2. 
  e4 | e a a fis8( gis) | a( gis) fis4 gis e | cis'2 cis |
  cis a | cis4( b8 a) b2 | cis a | a gis | a2. } \\
  { a,4 | a d a' gis | a gis8( fis) e4 cis | d e8( fis) e4 e, | a2. 
  a8( b) | cis4 d cis b | a b e e | a,2 a |
  a' fis | e e | a d, | e e | a,2. } >>
}
>> >> }
\layout { indent = #0 }
\midi { \tempo 4 = 100 }

"Diadem" (James Ellor, 1838) is also a popular alternative, although Methodist scholar Carlton Young notes that the "tune is sometimes described as a choral anthem", due to the repetition of the refrain "Crown him!" in running passages between the voices.[2][7]

\transpose f as {
<< <<
\new Staff { \clef treble \time 3/4 \partial 4 \key f \major \set Staff.midiInstrument = "church organ" \set Score.tempoHideNote = ##t \override Score.BarNumber  #'transparent = ##t
  \relative c' 
  << { c4 | f2 g4 | a8.( bes16 c4) f, | g( f) e | f2 e8( d) | c4. c8 d[ d] | c4( f) \bar"" \break
  f4 | d( bes') bes | a2 g4 | f2 f8( g) | a2 a4 | a( g) f | g( f) e | f8.( g16 a4) \bar"||" \break
  c4 | bes4.( a8 g bes | a4. g8 f a | g4. f8 e g | f4) f r | bes bes r | \break
  g g r | a a c | f,8.( g16 a4) bes | a2 g4 | f2 \bar"|." } \\
  { a,4 | c2 c4 | c2 d4 | d( c) bes | a2 c8( bes) | a4. a8 bes[ bes] | a2
  c4 | bes( d) d | c2 bes4 | a2 a8( bes) | c2 c4 | cis2 d4 | d c! bes | a8.( bes16 c4)
  es4 | d4.( c8 bes d | c4. bes8 a c | bes4. a8 g bes | a4) a r | d d r |
  c c r | c c c | c2 d4 | f2 e4 | c2 } >>
}
\new Lyrics \lyricmode {
All4 hail2 the4 pow'r2 of4 Je2 -- sus'4 name!2
Let4 an4. -- gels8 pros -- trate fall,2
let4 an2 -- gels4 pros2 -- trate4 fall;2
bring4 forth2 the4 roy2 -- al4 di2 -- a4 -- dem,2
and4 crown2. -- "" -- "" -- ""4 him, "" crown him, "" crown him,
"" crown him, and crown2 him4 Lord2 of4 all.2
}
\new Staff { \clef bass \key f \major \set Staff.midiInstrument = "church organ"
  \relative c
  << { f4 | a( f) e | f8.( g16 a4) a | bes( a) g | f2 g8( e) | f4. f8 f[ f] | f2
  a4 | bes( f) f | f2 e4 | f2 f4 | f2 f4 | a2 a4 | bes( a) g | f2
  a4 | bes f r | f f r | e e r | f f r | f f r |
  e e r | f f a | a8.( g16 f4) f | f8( a c4) bes4 | a2 } \\
  { f,4 | f4( a) c | f2 d4 | bes( c) c | f,2 r4 | r2 r4 | r2
  f4 | bes2 g4 | c2 c4 | f,2 f4 | f'2 f4 | e2 d4 | bes( c) c | f,2 
  f'4 | bes, bes r | f f r | c' c r | f4.( e8 d c | bes4. a8 g f | 
  c'4. d8 e c | f4) f r | r r8 f bes,[ bes] | c2 c4 | f,2 } >>
}
>> >> }
\layout { indent = #0 }
\midi { \tempo 4 = 90 }

Sources[edit]

  1. ^ "January 2: Edward Perronet; Christian History Institute". Archived from the original on 2006-06-17. Retrieved 2007-02-23.
  2. ^ a b c "All hail the power of Jesus name". Hymnology Archive.
  3. ^ a b "All Hail the Power of Jesus' Name". Hymnary.org.
  4. ^ Evangelical Lutheran Hymnary. St. Louis, MO: MorningStar Music Publishers, Inc. 1996. p. 266.
  5. ^ Watson, John Richard. "William Shrubsole (I)". The Canterbury Dictionary of Hymnology. Canterbury Press. Retrieved 30 May 2020.
  6. ^ The New English Hymnal. Norwich: The Canterbury Press. 1986. p. 723.
  7. ^ Trinity Psalter Hymnal. Willow Grove, PA: Trinity Psalter Hymnal Joint Venture. 2018. p. 638.

External links[edit]