All India Anna Dravida Munnetra Kazhagam

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All India Anna Dravida Munnetra Kazhagam
AbbreviationAIADMK
Leader
Presidium"Vacant"
Parliamentary ChairpersonM. Thambidurai
Lok Sabha leaderP. Ravindhranath
Rajya Sabha leaderM. Thambidurai
TreasurerO. Panneerselvam
FounderM. G. Ramachandran
Founded17 October 1972; 49 years ago (1972-10-17)
Split fromDravida Munnetra Kazhagam
HeadquartersPuratchi Thalaivar M.G.R. Maaligai, 226, Avvai Shanmugam Salai,
Royapettah, Chennai – 600014, Tamil Nadu, India.
NewspaperNamadhu Puratchi Thalaivi Amma (Daily journal)[1]
News J (Television channel)[2]
Student wingAIADMK Student Wing
Youth wingM.G.R. Youth Wing
Women's wingAIADMK Women's Wing
Labour wingAnna Trade Union Federation
IdeologyDravidianism
Populism
Social democracy
Social justice
Tamil nationalism[3][4]
Political positionCentre to centre-left
Colours  Green
ECI StatusState party[5]
AllianceNational Democratic Alliance
Seats in Lok Sabha
1 / 543
Seats in Rajya Sabha
4 / 245
Seats in Tamil Nadu Legislative Assembly
66 / 234
Election symbol
Two Leaves
Party flag
AIADMK Official Flag.png
Website
www.aiadmk.com

The All India Anna Dravida Munnetra Kazhagam (transl. All India Anna Dravidian Progressive Federation; abbr. AIADMK) is an Indian regional political party with great influence in the state of Tamil Nadu and union territory of Puducherry. It is a Dravidian party founded by former chief minister of Tamil Nadu M. G. Ramachandran (M.G.R.) at Madurai on 17 October 1972 as a breakaway faction from the Dravida Munnetra Kazhagam after M. Karunanidhi expelled him from the party for asking for accounts as party treasurer.[6] The party is adhering to the socio-democratic and social justice principles based on C. N. Annadurai collectively coined as Annaism by M.G.R.[7][8] The party has won a seven-time majority in the Tamil Nadu Legislative Assembly, has emerged as the most successful political outfit in the state's history. It is currently the main opposition party in the Tamil Nadu Legislative Assembly and part of the India-ruling National Democratic Alliance.[9]

From 9 February 1989 to 5 December 2016, AIADMK was led by former chief minister of Tamil Nadu J. Jayalalithaa (Amma) as the 5th and longest serving general secretary of the party. She was admired as Mother of the party by her cadre[10] and was highly popular among the Tamil populace until her death in 2016.[11] From 21 August 2017 to 23 June 2022, the party was led under dual leadership of the former chief ministers of Tamil Nadu O. Panneerselvam and Edappadi K. Palaniswami as coordinator and joint coordinator of the party respectively.[12][13][14]

From 11 July 2022, AIADMK is led by former chief minister of Tamil Nadu Edappadi K. Palaniswami (E.P.S.) as interim general secretary of the party.[15]

The headquarters of the party is called Puratchi Thalaivar M.G.R. Maaligai, which is located at Avvai Shanmugam Salai, Royapettah, Chennai. The building was donated to the party in 1986 by M.G.R.'s wife V. N. Janaki Ramachandran, former chief minister of Tamil Nadu.

Headquarters of the party
Puratchi Thalaivar M.G.R. Maaligai

Ideology and policies[edit]

The AIADMK sought to depoliticize the education policy of the government by not insisting that education be the Tamil language. Policies of AIADMK were targeted to the poorer segments of Tamil society – poor, rickshaw pullers, and destitute women and centralizing the massive noon meal scheme for children.[16][17] There was ambivalence toward the reservation policy and interests of farmers.[17]

The AIADMK posted an array of welfare schemes targeting the human development index of the state. AIADMK has schemes listed in the election manifestos covering segments of the population including fishermen, farmers, and school children. Till the 2000s, the parties had welfare schemes like maternity assistance, subsidized public transport, and educational grants. After the 2000s, the parties started competing at an increasing level for the distribution of consumer goods. The AIADMK government distributed free cycles to class 11 and class 12 students during its tenure of 2001–06. The DMK, in competition, promised free color televisions in its manifesto in 2006 assembly elections. The competition continued during the 2011 assembly elections when both parties announced free laptops for schools students and grinders mixers and fans for public.[18]

Culture[edit]

  • The party remains firm on its support for the "two language policy", in opposition to centre demands to have Hindi as the sole lingua franca language, where Tamil and English are the two main languages of Tamil Nadu.[19]
  • The party provides Rs. 1 lakh for temples of local deities in 2016.[20]

Economy[edit]

In the spring of 2019, the party lauded the economic policies of the Modi government (BJP), stating that the centre had ushered in economic stability and made the country a "decisive player" in regional economics, and voiced support for the Goods and Services Tax (GST) which had been opposed by their rival the DMK.[21]

Social justice[edit]

  • In 1980, the AIADMK under M. G. Ramachandran reversed his decision of economic criteria after the AIADMK faced a close defeat in the 1980 Indian general election in Tamil Nadu. He further raised the quota for the Backward Classes from 31 percent to 50 percent making the total reservation to 68%.[22]
  • In 1993, J Jayalalithaa's AIADMK government passed the Tamil Nadu Backward Classes, Scheduled Castes, and Scheduled Tribes Bill, 1993 in the Assembly (Act 45 of 1994).[23] The Bill was sent to the President for his approval. J Jayalalithaa's AIADMK government led a cross-party committee of Tamil Nadu politicians to Delhi to meet with the Central government. She also demanded that the Tamil Nadu[24] government's Act be placed in the Constitution's Ninth Schedule, ensuring that it cannot be contested in any court. The President's signature was received, confirming the 69 percent reservation for Tamil Nadu.[25]

State water policy[edit]

  • In 2006, AIADMK had initiated a case in the Supreme Court to uphold the state's rights on Mullaperiyar Dam issue. As a result, in May 2014, Supreme court verdict allowed the Tamil Nadu State to increase the storage level in the Mullaperiyar Dam to 142 feet from 136 ft and struck down the unconstitutional law enacted by the Kerala Government in 2006 restricting the storage level to 136 ft.[26] This Supreme Court Verdict sustained the livelihood of the farmers and people in the southern districts of Tamil Nadu.[27]
  • In February 2013, the Union Government notified the final award of Cauvery Water Disputes Tribunal (CWDT) on the directions of the Supreme Court. Then Chief Minister Jayalalithaa termed it as a "tremendous achievement" of her government after 22 long years of legal battle, the State had got Due justice.[28] Then Jayalalithaa said that it was the happiest day of her life and the happiest day for the farmers in Tamil Nadu, she recalled her famous fast-unto-death at Marina beach in 1993.[29][30][31]

Environment and nature[edit]

  • The AIADMK was one of two parties, along with BJP, not to voice opposition against a ban of cattle slaughter through the national Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Act. It has however sought an exemption in the Act over traditional bull fighting;[32] the party supports popular opinion in Tamil Nadu that traditional bull fighting, known as Jallikattu, should not be banned by the centre due to a ruling by the APEX court against animal cruelty.[33] During the controversy, both major parties of the state called for animal-rights organisation PETA to be banned.[34]
  • The AIADMK government has ordered the closure of the Sterlite Copper factory in Thoothukudi in the interest of the people, knowing that the air and water in the city are being heavily polluted by the factory, which has been at the center of violent protests by locals to protect and improve the environment.[35]
  • AIADMK opposes the building of the Mekedatu Dam which could reduce water flows into Tamil Nadu and negatively affect quality-of-live for residents and agriculture.[36]

History[edit]

M. G. Ramachandran era (17 October 1972 – 24 December 1987)[edit]

Dr. M.G. Ramachandran
Founder of the party

The party was founded on 17 October 1972 as Anna Dravida Munnetra Kazhagam (ADMK) by M. G. Ramachandran, a veteran Tamil film star and popular politician. It was set up as a breakaway faction of the DMK led by M. Karunanidhi, then chief minister of Tamil Nadu, owing to personal differences between the two.[37] M.G.R., who wanted to start a new party, then incorporated Anakaputhur Ramalingam into the party which had registered under the name 'ADMK'. He then declared, ‘I joined the party started by an ordinary volunteer’ and gave the post of Member of Legislative Council (MLC) to Ramalingam. Later, M.G.R. prefixed the All India (AI) tag to the party's name to save himself from IT raids and protect the party during Maintenance of Internal Security Act (MISA).[38] Since its inception, the relationship between the AIADMK and DMK has been marked by mutual contempt. M.G.R. used his fan network to build the party cadre with claims his party recruited more than a million members in the first two months. C. N. Annadurai's ideologue and movie producer turned politician R. M. Veerappan was the key architect in unifying the M.G.R. fan clubs and further consolidating the party structure in the 70s. Other key leaders such as Nanjil K. Manoharan and S. D. Somasundaram played major roles in consolidation.[39] The party's first victories were the win of Maya Thevar in Dindigul parliamentary bye-election in May 1973[40] and the win of C. Aranganayagam in Coimbatore West assembly bye-election a year later.[39] On 2 April 1973, AIADMK emerged as the third largest political party in Tamil Nadu, represented by 11 MLAs in the assembly. By 31 January 1976, AIADMK emerged as the second largest political party in Tamil Nadu with 16 MLAs in the assembly. AIADMK grew close to the Indian National Congress party by supporting the National Emergency between 1975 and 1977.

The DMK-led government was dismissed by a central promulgation on corruption charges in 1976. The AIADMK swept to power in 1977, defeating the DMK in the assembly election. M.G.R. sworn in as 3rd chief minister of the Tamil Nadu on 30 June 1977 and he remained in power until his death on 24 December 1987 by winning consecutive assembly elections held in 1980 and 1984.[37] In 1979, AIADMK became the first dravidian and regional party to be part of the Union Cabinet. Sathiavani Muthu and A. Bala Pajanor were the MPs joined the short-lived union ministry headed by Chaudhary Charan Singh, former prime minister of India.[38]

Relationship between the AIADMK and the INC slowly became strained. In the 1980 Indian general election, the INC aligned with the DMK and the alliance won 37 out of the 39 state parliamentary seats. The AIADMK won just two seats.[41] After returning to power Indira Gandhi dismissed a number of state governments belonging to the opposition parties, including the AIADMK government in Tamil Nadu.

Election in 1980 with the opposition DMK continuing the electoral alliance with the INC. In a massive reversal of fortunes following the Lok Sabha elections, the AIADMK won a comfortable majority in the state assembly with 129 of 234 seat. M.G.R. sworn in as chief minister for the second time on 9 June 1980.[41]

In 1984, even with M.G.R.'s failing health and hospitalization, the party won the assembly election in alliance with the INC. Many political historians consider M.G.R.'s persona and charisma at this point of time as "infallible", and a logical continuation of his on-screen "good lad" image, strengthened by his "mythical status" in the minds of the masses.[42] M.G.R. continued to enjoy popular support in his third tenure until his death on 24 December 1987.[42]

Succession crisis (25 December 1987 – 6 February 1989)[edit]

Following M.G.R.'s death, his wife, actress-turned-politician V. N. Janaki Ramachandran, rose to the party's leadership under support of R. M. Veerappan and 98 MLAs. She led the government for 23 days as the state's first female chief minister from 7 January 1988 until the state assembly was suspended on 30 January 1988 and President's rule imposed. The party began to crumble due to infighting and broke into two factions, one under Janaki Ramachandran and the other under J. Jayalalithaa, an associate of M.G.R. and another film actress-turned-politician who had starred with M.G.Ramachandran. The Election Commission Froze the "Two Leaves" symbol on 17 December 1988.[43] The 1989 assembly election saw the DMK regain power after 12 years in the opposition with M. Karunanidhi returning as the chief minister for the third time. AIADMK, due to its split, suffered heavily in the election, with the Janaki Ramachandran and Jayalalithaa factions winning only 2 and 27 seats respectively.[42] Following AIADMK's rout in the election, the factions led by Jayalalithaa and Janaki Ramachandran merged under the former's leadership on 10 February 1989, as Janaki decided that politics was not her forte. On 11 February 1989, Then Chief Election Commissioner R. V. S. Peri Sastri granted the Two Leaves symbol to the united AIADMK Party led by Jayalalithaa.[44] The AIADMK forged an alliance with the Indian National Congress (INC) in the 1989 lok sabha election and won 37 out of 39 seats in Tamil Nadu. The DMK government was dismissed in 1991 by the central government headed by then prime minister Chandra Shekhar, an ally of the AIADMK at that time, on charges that the constitutional machinery in the state had broken down.

J. Jayalalithaa era (9 February 1989 – 5 December 2016)[edit]

Dr. J. Jayalalithaa
Former General Secretary of the party

The AIADMK allied with the Indian National Congress (INC) and swept to power in the 1991 assembly election under the leadership of J. Jayalalithaa who became the second female and fifth chief minister of the state. Political observers have ascribed the landslide victory to the anti-incumbent wave arising out of the assassination of the former prime minister Rajiv Gandhi[42] by suspected Tamil separatists fighting for a homeland in neighbouring Sri Lanka. The ensuing government, was accused of large-scale corruption, but Jayalalithaa held on to power for a full term of five years. In the 1996 assembly election, AIADMK continued its alliance with the INC but suffered a massive rout, winning only 4 out of the 234 assembly seats, with even Jayalalithaa losing from Bargur constituency.[45][46]

The AIADMK formed an alliance with the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) and Vaiko's Marumalarchi Dravida Munnetra Kazhagam (MDMK), another breakaway faction of the DMK, during the parliamentary election in 1998.[45] AIADMK shared power with the BJP in the Atal Bihari Vajpayee headed government between 1998 and 1999,[38] but withdrew support in early 1999, leading to the fall of the BJP government. Following this, the AIADMK once again allied with the INC.

In the 2001 assembly election, the AIADMK-led alliance, consisting of the Indian National Congress, the Tamil Maanila Congress (Moopanar) (TMC(M)), the Left Front and the Pattali Makkal Katchi (PMK), regained power, winning 197 seats, with AIADMK winning 132.[47] Due to the proceedings in a disproportionate assets case which occurred in her previous tenure, Jayalalithaa was prevented from holding office. O. Panneerselvam, a close confidant of Jayalalithaa was appointed as the Chief Minister for the first time on 21 September 2001. Once the Supreme Court of India overturned Jayalalithaa's conviction and sentence in the case, O. Panneerselvam resigned on 2 March 2002, and Jayalalithaa again sworn in as chief minister for the third time.[47]

Her second term was not marred by corruption scandals. She took many popular decisions such as banning of lottery tickets, restricting the liquor and sand quarrying business to government agencies and banning tobacco product sales near schools and colleges. She encouraged women to join the state police force by setting up all women-police stations and commissioning 150 women into the elite level police commandos in 2003, a first in India. The women had the same training as men and included handling weapons, detection and disposal of bombs, driving, horseriding, and adventure sports.[48] She sent a special task force to the Sathyamangalam forests in October 2004 to hunt down notorious sandalwood smuggler Veerappan. The operation was successful as he was killed by the task force on 18 October 2004.

However, despite the popular measures taken by the government, in the 2004 Lok Sabha election, the party, in alliance with the BJP again, was humiliated, winning none of the 39 Lok Sabha seats from the state. The Democratic Progressive Alliance (DPA), a DMK-led alliance consisting of all the major opposition parties in the state, swept the election.

Later, in the 2006 assembly election, in spite of media speculations of a hung assembly, the AIADMK, contesting with only the support of MDMK and a few other smaller parties, won 61 seats compared to the DMK's 96 and was pushed out of power by the DMK-led congressional alliance of the PMK and the Left Front. The AIADMK's electoral reversals continued in the 2009 Lok Sabha election. However, the party's performance was better than its debacle in 2004, and it managed to win nine seats.

Swearing-in Ceremony of the Council of Ministers headed by Jayalalithaa on 16 May 2011

Following widespread corruption and allegations of nepotism against the DMK government, in the 2011 assembly election, the party, in alliance with parties like the left and actor-turned-politician Vijayakant's Desiya Murpokku Dravida Kazhagam (DMDK), swept the polls, winning 202 seats, with the AIADMK winning 150. Jayalalithaa was sworn in as Chief Minister for the fourth time.[47]

In the union territory of Puducherry, the AIADMK allied with N. Rangasamy's All India N.R. Congress (AINRC) and won the 2011 assembly election, which was held in parallel with the Tamil Nadu assembly election. However, it did not join the newly elected AINRC-led government. The AIADMK's good electoral performance continued in the 2014 Lok Sabha election. Contesting without allies, the AIADMK won an unprecedented 37 out of 39 seats in the state of Tamil Nadu, emerged as the third-largest party in parliament.

On 29 August 2014, J. Jayalalithaa was elected as the general secretary of the party for the 7th consecutive term, Making her the longest serving general secretary of the party till date. Earlier, She was elected in the years of 1988, 1989, 1993, 1998, 2003,[49] 2008[50] and 2014.[51]

On 27 September 2014, Jayalalithaa was convicted in the Disproportionate assets case by a Special Court along with her associates V. K. Sasikala, Ilavarasi and V. N. Sudhakaran, and sentenced to four-year simple imprisonment. Jayalalithaa was also fined 100 crores and her associates were fined 10 crore each. The case had political implications as it was the first case where a ruling chief minister had to step down on account of a court sentence.[52]

Due to her resignation O. Panneerselvam was sworn in as Chief Minister on 29 September 2014.[53] Jayalalithaa was denied bail by the High Court and moved the Supreme Court for bail. The Supreme Court granted bail on 17 October 2014. On 11 May 2015, the high court of Karnataka said she was acquitted from that case, and was again sworn in as Chief Minister for the fifth time.

In the 2016 assembly election contesting without allies, the AIADMK swept the polls, winning 135 out of 234 seats. On 23 May 2016, Jayalalithaa was sworn in as Chief Minister for the sixth time.[47]

On 22 September 2016, she was admitted to Apollo Hospital, Chennai due to fever and dehydration. After a prolonged illness, she died on 5 December 2016.

Expansion beyond Tamil Nadu and Puducherry[edit]

Under Jayalalithaa's regime, All India Anna Dravida Munnetra Kazhagam spread beyond Tamil Nadu and Puducherry. State units are established in Andhra Pradesh, Karnataka, and Kerala. The party also has a following in places like Andaman and Nicobar Islands, Maharashtra, National Capital Territory of Delhi and Telangana in India, also in countries where Tamil people are present.

In Karnataka, the party had members in the state assembly from 1983 to 2004 and has influence in the Tamil-speaking areas of Bengaluru and Kolar.

In Andhra Pradesh and Kerala, the party contested in some legislative assembly elections, but did not win a single seat in any of the elections.

V. K. Sasikala and T. T. V. Dhinakaran era (31 December 2016 – 17 February 2017)[edit]

After J. Jayalalithaa's death on 5 December 2016, her long-time friend V. K. Sasikala was selected unanimously as the General Secretary of the party on 16 December 2016.[54][55] On February 5, 2017, she was selected as the leader of the legislative assembly as chief minister. O. Panneerselvam rebelled against V. K. Sasikala and reported that he had been compelled to resign as Chief Minister, bringing in a new twist to Tamil Nadu Politics. Due to a conviction in Disproportionate assets case against Jayalalithaa, Sasikala was sentenced to 4 years imprisonment in the Bengaluru Central Prison. Before that, she appointed Edappadi K. Palaniswami as legislative party leader (Chief Minister).

She also appointed her nephew and former Treasurer of the party T. T. V. Dhinakaran as the deputy general secretary of AIADMK party. With the support of 123 MLAs, Edappadi K. Palaniswami became chief minister of Tamil Nadu.

On 23 March 2017, the election commission of India gave separate party symbols to the two factions; O. Panneerselvam's faction known as AIADMK (PURATCHI THALAIVI AMMA), while Edappadi K. Palaniswami's faction known as AIADMK (AMMA).

By-polls were announced at the Dr. Radhakrishnan Nagar constituency which was vacated due to Jayalalithaa's death. But, the election commission canceled the by-polls after evidence of large-scale bribing by the ruling AIADMK (AMMA) surfaced. On 17 April 2017, Delhi police registered a case against Dhinakaran who was also the candidate for AIADMK (AMMA) for the by-poll at Dr. Radhakrishnan Nagar regarding an allegation of attempting to bribe the Election Commission of India (ECI) for the AIADMK's election symbol. However the Tis Hazari Special Court granted him bail on the grounds that the police failed to identify the public official allegedly bribed.

T. T. V. Dhinakaran started his party work on 5 August 2017. However, the chief minister Edappadi K. Palaniswami had a fallout with Dhinakaran and announced that the appointment of T. T. V. Dinakaran as deputy general secretary was invalid. So T. T. V. Dhinakaran claims that's "We are the real AIADMK and 95% of its cadres are with us."

Expulsion of V. K. Sasikala and T. T. V. Dhinakaran[edit]

On 12 September 2017, the AIADMK general council which appointed her earlier, cancelled V. K. Sasikala's appointment as general secretary and officially expelled her from the party as a primary member.[56][57]

Earlier on 10 August 2017, T. T. V. Dhinakaran was sacked as deputy general secretary at the meeting headed by Edappadi K. Palaniswami at Puratchi Thalaivar M.G.R. Maaligai.[58][57]

After completion of her imprisonment at Parappana Agrahara Central Prison, Sasikala filed a case in the City Civil Court IV of Chennai in February 2021, but it upheld her dismissal as the AIADMK general secretary in April 2022.[59]

O. Panneerselvam and Edappadi K. Palaniswami era (21 August 2017 – 23 June 2022)[edit]

On 21 August 2017, both O. Panneerselvam and Edappadi K. Palaniswami factions of the AIADMK merged and O. Panneerselvam was sworn in as the Deputy Chief Minister of Tamil Nadu with portfolio of Finance and the coordinator of AIADMK. He also holds portfolios of Housing, Rural Housing, Housing Development, Slum Clearance Board and Accommodation Control, Town Planning, Urban Development, and Chennai Metropolitan Development Authority.[60] On 4 January 2018, O. Panneerselvam was elected Leader of the House in Tamil Nadu Legislative Assembly.

On 12 September 2017, the AIADMK general council decided to cancel V. K. Sasikala's appointment as general secretary and officially expelled her from the party, though prominent members appointed to party posts by her were allowed to continue discharging their functions. Instead, the late J. Jayalalithaa was named the eternal general secretary of AIADMK.[56][57]

A day after the merger of two AIADMK factions, 19 MLAs[61] owing allegiance to ousted deputy general secretary T. T. V. Dhinakaran on 22 April 2017 submitted letters to Governor, expressing lack of confidence in Chief Minister Edappadi K. Palaniswami and withdrawing support from the government.[61] 18 out of those 19 MLAs were disqualified from office by the Speaker of Legislature upon recommendation from AIADMK Chief Whip. After a prolonged legal battle, the Speaker's orders were upheld by the High Court of Chennai and bye-elections were alongside the Parliament general elections. The election commission of India on 23 November 2017 granted the two leaves symbol to the O. Panneerselvam and Edappadi K. Palaniswami camp.

On 14 November 2017, AIADMK launched its own news channel News J, named after late AIADMK supremo J. Jayalalithaa replacing Jaya TV.[2][62] on 24 February 2018, AIADMK new mouthpiece Namadhu Amma a Tamil daily was launched marking 70th Birth anniversary of late AIADMK supremo J. Jayalalithaa.[1][63]

Despite the popular measures taken by the government, in the 2019 Lok Sabha election, the party, in alliance with the BJP again, was humiliated, winning one of the 39 Lok Sabha seats from the state. The Secular Progressive Alliance (SPA), a DMK-led alliance consisting of all the major opposition parties in the state, swept the election by winning 38 seats.

Later, in the 2021 assembly election, the AIADMK contested with the support of the same National Democratic Alliance (NDA) and a few other smaller parties, won 66 seats compared to the DMK's 133 seats and was pushed out of power by the DMK-led secular progressive alliance. After the election, the AIADMK emerged as the main party of the opposition in the assembly. On 11 May 2021, party joint coordinator Edappadi K. Palaniswami recognized as the Leader of the Opposition in the Tamil Nadu Legislative Assembly and on 14 June 2021, party coordinator O. Panneerselvam recognized as the Deputy Leader of the Opposition in the Tamil Nadu Legislative Assembly by M. Appavu, Speaker of the assembly.

Legal Fight for the party by V. K. Sasikala and T. T. V. Dhinakaran[edit]

After that V. K. Sasikala and T. T. V. Dhinakaran had appealed to the Delhi High Court, who rejected their appeal and said that O. Panneerselvam and Edappadi K. Palaniswami camp are the original AIADMK.

After that T. T. V. Dhinakaran had also appealed to the Supreme Court of India on March 15, the bench of Chief Justice of India has also rejected his appeal against the judgement made by Delhi High Court in favor of O. Panneerselvam and Edappadi K. Palaniswami camp.

Following this, the General Council passed a resolution removing V. K. Sasikala from the post of General Secretary. V. K. Sasikala and T. T. V. Dhinakaran jointly filed a suit in the High Court challenging the decision of the General Council. Since it was a civil case, the case was transferred to the City Civil Court. During the hearing on April 9, 2021, Dinakaran told the court that he would withdraw from the case as he had started a party called Amma Makkal Munnettra Kazagam. At the same time, Sasikala told the court that she wanted to continue the case. The court dismissed her plea following an interlocutory application from AIADMK Coordinator O. Panneerselvam and Joint Coordinator Edappadi K. Palaniswami.[64]

Leadership tussle between OPS and EPS[edit]

On 14 June 2022, Citing the party's troubles in the polls, AIADMK district secretaries and other senior party members spoke out to shun the “dual leadership” system and came out publicly in favor of strong unitary leader to strengthen the organisation.

Edappadi K. Palaniswami supporters pushed for the change in the party's leadership structure by staging a political coup against AIADMK Coordinator O. Panneerselvam, who had become weak within the party. According to many sources, of the AIADMK’s 75 district secretaries, hardly 10 supported him. Of the party’s 66 MLAs, only five MLAs were reportedly on O. Panneerselvam side and less than 20 percent of the party’s general council members behind him ahead of crucial general council meeting on 23 June 2022, which was expected to elect the single leadership to the party.[65]

On 23 June 2022, A. Tamil Magan Hussain was unanimously elected as the Presidium Chairman of the party at a general council meeting held at the Shrivaaru Venkatachalapathy Palace in Vanagaram, Chennai.[66][67] On the same day, Presidium Chairman Tamil Magan Hussain announced that the next general council meeting of the party would be held on 11 July 2022.[68][69]

On 30 June 2022, Edappadi K. Palaniswami wrote a letter to O. Panneerselvam asserting the latter ceased to be the party coordinator as the amendments made to the party’s bylaw in the 2020 December executive committee meeting were not recognised in the general council meeting held on 23 June 2022.[70][71]

General Council Meeting[edit]

On 11 July 2022, AIADMK general council meeting held at the Shrivaaru Venkatachalapathy Palace in Vanagaram following the dismissal of a petition by O. Panneerselvam in the Madras High Court.[72] The party general council abolished the dual leadership model and empowered Edappadi K. Palaniswami as the Interim General Secretary, and called for organisational elections in 4 months.[73] Before the general council meeting there was violence at the Puratchi Thalaivar M.G.R. Maaligai in Royapettah, where the supporters of Palaniswami and Panneerselvam threw stones, bottles, plastic chairs at each other and damaged several vehicles nearby.[74] Following this the Revenue Department of Tamil Nadu sealed the Puratchi Thalaivar M.G.R. Maaligai, overall 47 people were injured in the clashes.[75]

The general council meeting made 20 amendments to the AIADMK bylaws including the removal of rule 20 which had described J. Jayalalithaa as the "eternal general secretary", reviving the post of General Secretary, transferring all the powers of Coordinator and Joint coordinator to the General Secretary, and abolished the posts of Coordinator and Joint coordinator. These changes in effect ended dual leadership in the party.[76]

Expulsion of O. Panneerselvam[edit]

In the general council meeting held on 11 July 2022, the general council members passed the resolution and expelled the former coordinator O. Panneerselvam,[77] the former deputy coordinator R. Vaithilingam, P. H. Manoj Pandian and J. C. D. Prabhakar from their respective posts and primary membership of the party for "anti-party" activities.[78][79]

Edappadi K. Palaniswami era (11 July 2022 – present)[edit]

Edappadi K. Palaniswami
Interim General Secretary of the party

On 11 July 2022, former chief Minister of Tamil Nadu Edappadi K. Palaniswami was unanimously elected as the Interim General Secretary of the party in the general council meeting held at the Shrivaaru Venkatachalapathy Palace in Vanagaram, Chennai.[15] Palaniswami appointed Dindigul C. Srinivasan as the treasurer of the party replacing O. Panneerselvam.[80] On 19 July 2022, Palaniswami appointed R. B. Udhayakumar as the deputy leader of the opposition in the Tamil Nadu Legislative Assembly replacing Panneerselvam which declared in the party's legislative members meeting held on 17 July 2022.[81][82]

On 20 July 2022, The Madras High Court ordered to remove the seal of Puratchi Thalaivar M.G.R. Maaligai and handover the keys to the interim general secretary Edappadi K. Palaniswami.[83] Earlier, It was locked and sealed on 11 July 2022.[84][85]

Criticism[edit]

Being a popular actor, M.G.R.'s fan clubs became a source for electoral mobilization. The head of his fan club, R. M. Veerappan, became a lieutenant, and fellow actress J. Jayalalithaa was groomed as a possible heir apparent.[86] There was a near administrative collapse during M.G.R.'s rule, and the state's rank in industrial production dropped from 3rd in the nation in 1977 to 13th position in 1987.[86] Populist schemes that consumed two-thirds of the state's budget resulted in long-term economic costs.[86] M.G.R. was running a centralized administration which caused a severe toll on the state administration during his extended period of illness.[87]

Personality cult[edit]

Jayalalithaa was also accused of creating a personality cult, with fans and party activists calling her 'Amma' ('mother' in Tamil). Her face adorned food canteens, pharmacies, salt packets, laptop computers, baby care kits, bottled water, medicine shops and cement bags. Following her imprisonment on 27 September 2014, her supporters held protests and wept openly. Her replacement, the party's former minister O. Panneerselvam, also wept during his inauguration, with colleagues saying they were in mourning.[88] Due to the centralized leadership of Jayalalithaa, the state of Tamil Nadu experienced policy paralysis, with most legislators and party cadres protesting against her conviction with hunger fasts, road and rail blockades.[89][90] The entire Cabinet would fall in line and bow in front of the helicopter in which it was flying. Members of the party, at all levels never found it difficult to prostrate before her in full view of the public.[91] Even after her death, the AIADMK leaders continued to prostrate themselves before her burial ground.[92][93]

Debt crisis[edit]

The overall debt burden of Tamil Nadu is expected to reach more than ₹ 5 lakh crore by March 31, 2022, during the AIADMK government.[94] Under Jayalalithaa and the AIADMK tenure, the State debt as percentage of GSDP was about 5% increase in 2011. It was 16.92% in 2011–12. It was 21.83% as of April 2021 during the Edappadi K. Palaniswami's government.[95] The opposition criticized the financial mismanagement by the AIADMK who left a ₹ 62,000 per head for each person of the state. The opposition criticized that the entire debt of the state government in the 2006–11 DMK regime was only Rs 44,000 crore, but the AIADMK regime has made a debt of ₹ 3.55 lakh crore.[96] The overall debt the AIADMK government left behind as of March 31, 2021 is estimated to be ₹ 4,85,502.54 crore and as on March 31, 2022, it is estimated to be ₹ 5,70,189.29 crore.[97]

Electoral performance[edit]

Indian general elections[edit]

Vote share in Lok Sabha elections
2019
1.28%
2014
3.27%
2009
1.67%
2004
2.19%
1999
1.93%
1998
1.83%
1996
0.64%
1991
1.62%
1989
1.50%
1984
1.69%
1980
2.36%
1977
2.90%
Lok Sabha Elections
Year Party leader Seats contested Seats won Change in seats Percentage of votes Vote swing Popular vote Result
1977 M. G. Ramachandran 21
18 / 542
Increase 18 2.90% Steady 54,80,378 Government
1980 24
2 / 542
Decrease 16 2.36% Decrease 0.54% 46,74,064 Opposition
1984 12
12 / 533
Increase 10 1.69% Decrease 0.67 39,68,967 Government
1989 J. Jayalalithaa 11
11 / 545
Decrease 1 1.50% Decrease 0.19 45,18,649 Opposition
1991 11
11 / 545
Steady 1.62% Increase 0.12 44,70,542 Government
1996 10
0 / 545
Decrease 11 0.64% Decrease 0.98 21,30,286 Lost
1998 23
18 / 545
Increase 18 1.83% Increase 1.19% 67,31,550 Government
1999 29
10 / 545
Decrease 8 1.93% Increase 0.10 70,46,953 Opposition
2004 33
0 / 543
Decrease 10 2.19% Increase 0.26 85,47,014 Lost
2009 23
9 / 543
Increase 9 1.67% Decrease 0.52 69,53,591 Others
2014 40
37 / 543
Increase 28 3.27% Increase 1.60% 1,81,11,579 Others
2019 O. Panneerselvam and Edappadi K. Palaniswami 21
1 / 543
Decrease 36 1.28% Decrease 1.99% 78,30,146 Government

State legislative assembly elections[edit]

Vote share in Tamil Nadu Assembly elections
2021
33.29%
2016
40.77%
2011
38.40%
2006
32.64%
2001
31.44%
1996
21.47%
1991
44.39%
1989
21.77%
1984
37.03%
1980
38.75%
1977
30.36%
Tamil Nadu Legislative Assembly Elections[98]
Year Party leader Seats contested Seats won Change in seats Percentage of votes Vote swing Popular vote Result
1977 M. G. Ramachandran 200
130 / 234
Increase 130 30.36% Steady 51,94,876 Government
1980 177
129 / 234
Decrease 1 38.75% Increase 8.39% 73,03,010 Government
1984 155
132 / 234
Increase 3 37.03% Decrease 1.72% 80,30,809 Government
1989 J. Jayalalithaa 202
29 / 234
Decrease 103 21.77% Decrease 15.26% 52,47,317 Opposition
1991 168
164 / 234
Increase 135 44.39% Increase 22.62% 1,09,40,966 Government
1996 168
4 / 234
Decrease 160 21.47% Decrease 22.92% 58,31,383 Others
2001 141
132 / 234
Increase 128 31.44% Increase 9.97% 88,15,387 Government
2006 188
61 / 234
Decrease 71 32.64% Increase 1.20% 1,07,68,559 Opposition
2011 165
150 / 234
Increase 89 38.40% Increase 5.76% 1,41,50,289 Government
2016 234
136 / 234
Decrease 14 40.77% Increase 2.37% 1,76,16,266 Government
2021 O. Panneerselvam and Edappadi K. Palaniswami 191
66 / 234
Decrease 70 33.29% Decrease 7.48% 1,53,91,055 Opposition
Vote share in Puducherry Assembly elections
2021
4.14%
2016
16.82%
2011
13.75%
2006
16.04%
2001
12.56%
1996
12.53%
1991
17.34%
1990
18.17%
1985
15.75%
1980
18.60%
1977
30.96%
1974
27.83%
Puducherry Legislative Assembly Elections[99]
Year Party leader Seats contested Seats won Change in seats Percentage of votes Vote swing Popular vote Result
1974 M. G. Ramachandran 21
12 / 30
Increase 12 27.83% Steady 60,812 Government
1977 27
14 / 30
Increase 2 30.96% Increase 3.13% 69,873 Government
1980 18
0 / 30
Decrease 14 18.60% Decrease 12.36% 45,623 Lost
1985 10
6 / 30
Increase 6 15.75% Decrease 2.85% 47,521 Opposition
1990 J. Jayalalithaa 13
3 / 30
Decrease 3 18.17% Increase 2.42% 76,337 Opposition
1991 10
6 / 30
Increase 3 17.34% Decrease 0.83% 67,792 Government
1996 10
3 / 30
Decrease 3 12.53% Decrease 4.81% 57,678 Opposition
2001 20
3 / 30
Steady 12.56% Increase 0.03% 59,926 Government
2006 18
3 / 30
Steady 16.04% Increase 3.48% 90,699 Others
2011 10
5 / 30
Increase 2 13.75% Decrease 2.29% 95,960 Government
2016 30
4 / 30
Decrease 1 16.82% Increase 3.07% 1,34,597 Opposition
2021 O. Panneerselvam and Edappadi K. Palaniswami 5
0 / 30
Decrease 4 4.14% Decrease 12.68% 34,623 Lost
Vote share in Karnataka Assembly elections
2018
0.01%
2013
0.03%
2008
0.03%
2004
0.07%
1999
0.18%
1994
0.24%
1989
0.18%
1983
0.13%
1978
0.18%
Karnataka Legislative Assembly Elections[100]
Year Party leader Seats contested Seats won Change in seats Percentage of votes Vote swing Popular vote Result
1978 M. G. Ramachandran 7 Steady 0.18% Steady 22,310 Lost
1983 1 Increase 1 0.13% Decrease 0.05% 16,234 Government
1989 J. Jayalalithaa 1 Steady 0.18% Increase 0.05% 32,928 Government
1994 4 Steady 0.24% Increase 0.06% 50,696 Opposition
1999 13 Steady 0.18% Decrease 0.06% 39,865 Government
2004 2 Decrease 1 0.07% Decrease 0.11% 16,737 Lost
2008 7 Steady 0.03% Decrease 0.04% 9,088 Lost
2013 5 Steady 0.03% Steady 10,280 Lost
2018 O. Panneerselvam and Edappadi K. Palaniswami 3 Steady 0.01% Decrease 0.02% 2,072 Lost
Vote share in Kerala Assembly elections
2021
0.05%
2016
0.17%
2011
0.01%
2006
0.12%
1980
0.00%
1977
0.02%
Kerala Legislative Assembly Elections[101]
Year Party leader Seats contested Seats won Change in seats Percentage of votes Vote swing Popular vote Result
1977 M. G. Ramachandran 2 Steady 0.02% Steady 2,114 Lost
1980 1 Steady 0.00% Decrease 0.02% 224 Lost
2006 J. Jayalalithaa 29 Steady 0.12% Increase 0.12% 19,078 Lost
2011 4 Steady 0.01% Decrease 0.11% 2,448 Lost
2016 7 Steady 0.17% Increase 0.16% 33,440 Lost
2021 O. Panneerselvam and Edappadi K. Palaniswami 1 Steady 0.05% Decrease 0.12% 10,376 Lost
Vote share in Andhra Pradesh Assembly elections
1999
0.02%
1994
0.05%
1978
0.19%
Andhra Pradesh Legislative Assembly Elections[102]
Year Party leader Seats contested Seats won Change in seats Percentage of votes Vote swing Popular vote Result
1978 M. G. Ramachandran 9 Steady 0.19% Steady 38,691 Lost
1994 J. Jayalalithaa 2 Steady 0.05% Decrease 0.14% 14,251 Lost
1999 5 Steady 0.02% Decrease 0.03% 7,281 Lost

Current office bearers and prominent members[edit]

Member Position in Government Party Position
Edappadi K. Palaniswami Joint Coordinator
K. P. Munusamy Deputy Coordinator
Natham R. Viswanathan Organizational Secretary
A. Tamil Magan Hussain
  • Former Chairperson of Tamil Nadu Waqf Board
Interim Presidium Chairman
Dindigul C. Srinivasan Organizational Secretary
M. Thambidurai Rajya Sabha Leader and Propaganda Secretary
S. P. Velumani Organizational Secretary
R. B. Udhayakumar Puratchi Thalaivi Amma Federation Secretary
S. Ravi Ranipet District Secretary
Kadambur C. Raju Thoothukkudi North District Secretary
K. P. Anbalagan Dharmapuri District Secretary
Agri S.S. Krishnamoorthy Agriculture Wing Secretary
C. Ponnaiyan
  • Former Minister for Finance of Tamil Nadu
All World M.G.R. Forum Secretary
Pollachi V. Jayaraman Election Wing Secretary
B. Valarmathi
  • Former Minister for Social Welfare and Nutritious Noon Meal Programme of Tamil Nadu
Women's Wing Secretary
A. Justin Selvaraj Steady Minority Welfare Wing Secretary
Thadi Ma. Rasu Steady Anna Trade Union Federation President
P. Venugopal Medical Wing Secretary
V. S. Sethuraman Steady Advocate Wing President
Vaigaichelvan
  • Former Minister for School Education of Tamil Nadu
Literature Wing Secretary
R. Kamalakannan Steady Anna Trade Union Federation Secretary
K. Sankaradas Steady Non-organizational Driver Wing Secretary
S. R. Vijayakumar Student Wing Secretary
N. R. Sivapathi
  • Former Minister for Animal Husbandry of Tamil Nadu
M.G.R. Youth Wing Secretary
V. P. B. Paramasivam Youth Brigade Secretary
Singai G. Ramachandran Steady IT Wing Secretary
State Unit Secretaries
A. Anbalagan Puducherry (East) Unit Secretary
S. D. Kumar Steady Karnataka Unit Secretary
G. Shobakumar Steady Kerala Unit Secretary

List of party leadership[edit]

President

No. Portrait Name
(Birth–Death)
Term in Office
Assumed Office Left Office Time in Office
1 MG Ramachandran 2017 stamp of India.jpg M. G. Ramachandran
(1917–1987)
17 October 1972 24 December 1987 15 years, 68 days

General Secretaries

No. Portrait Name
(Birth–Death)
Term in Office
Assumed Office Left Office Time in Office
1 MG Ramachandran 2017 stamp of India.jpg M. G. Ramachandran
(1917–1987)
17 October 1972 22 June 1978 6 years, 316 days
17 October 1986 24 December 1987
2 V. R. Nedunchezhiyan, Former Chief Minister of Tamil Nadu.jpg V. R. Nedunchezhiyan
(1920–2000)
23 June 1978 10 June 1980 3 years, 33 days
25 December 1987 8 February 1989
3 Pavushanmugam.jpg P. U. Shanmugam
(1924–2007)
11 June 1980 13 March 1985 4 years, 275 days
4 Raghavanandam.jpg S. Raghavanandam
(1917–1999)
14 March 1985 16 October 1986 1 year, 216 days
5 J Jayalalithaa.jpg J. Jayalalithaa
(1948–2016)
9 February 1989 5 December 2016 27 years, 300 days
Acting V. K. Sasikala Natarajan.jpg V. K. Sasikala
(1954–)
31 December 2016 17 February 2017 48 days
Interim EdappadiKPalaniswami.jpg Edappadi K. Palaniswami
(1954–)
11 July 2022 17 august 2022 37 days

Coordinators

No. Portrait Name
(Birth–Death)
Term in Office
Assumed Office Left Office Time in Office
1 OPanneerselvam.jpg Coordinator
O. Panneerselvam
(1951–)
21 August 2017 23 June 2022 4 years, 306 days
EdappadiKPalaniswami.jpg Joint Coordinator
Edappadi K. Palaniswami
(1954–)

Legislative leaders[edit]

List of union cabinet ministers[edit]

No. Portrait Name
(Birth–Death)
Portfolio Term in Office Constituency
(House)
Prime Minister
Assumed Office Left Office Time in Office
1 Sathiavani Muthu.jpg Sathiavani Muthu
(1923–1999)
Minister of Social Welfare 19 August 1979 23 December 1979 126 days Tamil Nadu
(Rajya Sabha)
Chaudhary Charan Singh
2 A. Bala Pajanor.jpg A. Bala Pajanor
(1935–2013)
Minister of Petroleum, Chemicals and Fertilizers Puducherry
(Lok Sabha)
3 Sedapatti Muthiah.jpg R. Muthiah
(1945–)
Minister of Surface Transport 19 March 1998 8 April 1998 20 days Periyakulam
(Lok Sabha)
Atal Bihari Vajpayee
4 MThambidurai.jpg M. Thambidurai
(1947–)
Minister of Law, Justice and Company Affairs 19 March 1998 8 April 1999 1 year, 20 days Karur
(Lok Sabha)
Minister of Surface Transport 8 April 1998 1 year

List of chief ministers[edit]

Chief Ministers of Tamil Nadu

No. Portrait Name
(Birth–Death)
Term in Office Assembly Constituency Ministry
Assumed Office Left Office Time in Office
1 MG Ramachandran 2017 stamp of India.jpg M. G. Ramachandran
(1917–1987)
30 June 1977 17 February 1980 10 years, 65 days 6th Aruppukottai Ramachandran I
9 June 1980 9 February 1985 7th Madurai West Ramachandran II
10 February 1985 24 December 1987 8th Andipatti Ramachandran III
Acting V. R. Nedunchezhiyan, Former Chief Minister of Tamil Nadu.jpg V. R. Nedunchezhiyan
(1920–2000)
24 December 1987 7 January 1988 14 days Athoor Nedunchezhiyan II
2 V. N. Janaki Ramachandran.jpg V. N. Janaki Ramachandran
(1924–1996)
7 January 1988 30 January 1988 23 days Did not contest Janaki
3 J Jayalalithaa.jpg J. Jayalalithaa
(1948–2016)
24 June 1991 12 May 1996 14 years, 124 days 10th Bargur Jayalalithaa I
14 May 2001 21 September 2001 12th Did not contest Jayalalithaa II
2 March 2002 12 May 2006 Andipatti Jayalalithaa III
16 May 2011 27 September 2014 14th Srirangam Jayalalithaa IV
23 May 2015 22 May 2016 Dr. Radhakrishnan Nagar Jayalalithaa V
23 May 2016 5 December 2016 15th Jayalalithaa VI
4 OPanneerselvam.jpg O. Panneerselvam
(1951–)
21 September 2001 2 March 2002 1 year, 106 days 12th Periyakulam Panneerselvam I
28 September 2014 23 May 2015 14th Bodinayakkanur Panneerselvam II
5 December 2016 15 February 2017 15th Panneerselvam III
5 EdappadiKPalaniswami.jpg Edappadi K. Palaniswami
(1954–)
16 February 2017 6 May 2021 4 years, 79 days Edappadi Palaniswami

Chief Minister of Puducherry

No. Portrait Name
(Birth–Death)
Term in Office Assembly Constituency Ministry
Assumed Office Left Office Time in Office
1 S. Ramassamy.jpg S. Ramassamy
(1939–2017)
6 March 1974 28 March 1974 1 year, 155 days 3rd Karaikal South Ramassamy I
2 July 1977 12 November 1978 4th Ramassamy II

List of deputy chief minister[edit]

Deputy Chief Minister of Tamil Nadu

No. Portrait Name
(Birth–Death)
Term in Office Assembly Constituency Chief Minister
Assumed Office Left Office Time in Office
1 OPanneerselvam.jpg O. Panneerselvam
(1951–)
21 August 2017 6 May 2021 3 years, 258 days 15th Bodinayakkanur Edappadi K. Palaniswami

List of deputy speaker of the Lok Sabha[edit]

No. Name
(Birth–Death)
Portrait Term in Office Lok Sabha Constituency Speaker
Assumed Office Left Office Time in Office
1 MThambidurai.jpg M. Thambidurai
(1947–)
22 January 1985 27 November 1989 9 years, 229 days 8th Dharmapuri Balram Jakhar
13 August 2014 25 May 2019 16th Karur Sumitra Mahajan

List of union ministers of state[edit]

No. Portrait Name
(Birth–Death)
Portfolio Term in Office Constituency
(House)
Cabinet Minister Prime Minister
Assumed Office Left Office Time in Office
1 No image available.svg R. K. Kumar
(1942–1999)
Minister of State for Parliamentary Affairs 19 March 1998 22 May 1998 64 days Tamil Nadu
(Rajya Sabha)
Madan Lal Khurana Atal Bihari Vajpayee
Minister of State for Finance 20 March 1998 63 days Yashwant Sinha
2 Kadambur R. Janarthanan.jpg Kadambur M. R. Janarthanan
(1929–2020)
Minister of State for Personnel, Public Grievances and Pensions 20 March 1998 8 April 1999 1 year, 19 days Tirunelveli
(Lok Sabha)
Atal Bihari Vajpayee
Minister of State for Finance 22 May 1998 321 days Yashwant Sinha

List of speakers[edit]

Speakers of the Tamil Nadu Legislative Assembly

No. Portrait Name
(Birth–Death)
Term in Office Assembly Constituency
Assumed Office Left Office Time in Office
1 Munu Adhi.jpg Munu Adhi
(1926–2005)
6 July 1977 18 June 1980 2 years, 348 days 6th Tambaram
2 K Rajaram.jpg K. Rajaram
(1926–2008)
21 June 1980 24 February 1985 4 years, 248 days 7th Panamarathupatti
3 P.H. Pandian.jpg P. H. Pandian
(1945–2020)
27 February 1985 5 February 1989 3 years, 344 days 8th Cheranmadevi
4 Sedapatti Muthiah.jpg R. Muthiah
(1945–)
3 July 1991 21 May 1996 4 years, 323 days 10th Sedapatti
5 K. Kalimuthu.jpg K. Kalimuthu
(1942–2006)
24 May 2001 1 February 2006 4 years, 253 days 12th Tirumangalam
6 D. Jayakumar.jpg D. Jayakumar
(1960–)
27 May 2011 29 September 2012 1 year, 125 days 14th Royapuram
7 P. Dhanapal.jpg P. Dhanapal
(1951–)
10 October 2012 24 May 2016 8 years, 196 days 14th Rasipuram
3 June 2016 3 May 2021 15th Avanashi

Speakers of the Puducherry Legislative Assembly

No. Portrait Name
(Birth–Death)
Term in Office Assembly Constituency
Assumed Office Left Office Time in Office
1 No image available.svg S. Pakkiam
(unknown–unknown)
26 March 1974 28 March 1974 2 days 4th Bussy

List of leaders of the opposition[edit]

Leaders of the Opposition in the Tamil Nadu Legislative Assembly

No. Portrait Name
(Birth–Death)
Term in Office Assembly Constituency
Assumed Office Left Office Time in Office
1 J Jayalalithaa.jpg J. Jayalalithaa
(1948–2016)
9 February 1989 1 December 1989 5 years, 280 days 9th Bodinayakkanur
29 May 2006 14 May 2011 13th Andipatti
2 S.R.Radha.jpg S. R. Eradha
(1934–2020)
1 December 1989 19 January 1991 1 year, 49 days 9th Madurai East
3 OPanneerselvam.jpg O. Panneerselvam
(1951–)
19 May 2006 28 May 2006 9 days 13th Periyakulam
4 EdappadiKPalaniswami.jpg Edappadi K. Palaniswami
(1954–)
11 May 2021 Incumbent 1 year, 98 days 16th Edappadi

Leaders of the Opposition in the Puducherry Legislative Assembly

No. Portrait Name
(Birth–Death)
Term in Office Assembly Constituency
Assumed Office Left Office Time in Office
1 No image available.svg P. K. Loganathan
(1938–2013)
16 March 1985 4 March 1990 4 years, 353 days 7th Oupalam
2 No image available.svg V. M. C. V. Ganapathy
(1960–)
4 July 1991 13 May 1996 4 years, 314 days 9th Neravy T. R. Pattinam

List of deputy leaders of the opposition[edit]

Deputy Leaders of the Opposition in the Tamil Nadu Legislative Assembly

No. Portrait Name
(Birth–Death)
Term in Office Assembly Constituency Leader of the Opposition
Assumed Office Left Office Time in Office
1 Thirunavukarasar.jpg Su. Thirunavukkarasar
(1949–)
9 February 1989 19 January 1991 1 year, 344 days 9th Aranthangi J. Jayalalithaa
(9 February 1989 – 1 December 1989)
S. R. Eradha
(1 December 1989 – 19 January 1991)
2 KASengottaiyan.jpg K. A. Sengottaiyan
(1948–)
19 May 2006 28 May 2006 9 days 13th Gobichettipalayam O. Panneerselvam
3 OPanneerselvam.jpg O. Panneerselvam
(1951–)
29 May 2006 14 May 2011 6 years, 12 days Periyakulam J. Jayalalithaa
14 June 2021 11 July 2022 16th Bodinayakkanur Edappadi K. Palaniswami
4 R. B. Udhayakumar.jpg R. B. Udhayakumar
(1973–)
19 July 2022 Incumbent 29 days Tirumangalam

See also[edit]

References[edit]

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