All India Coordination Committee of Communist Revolutionaries

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All India Coordination Committee of Communist Revolutionaries
Abbreviation AICCCR
Motto Communism
Merged into Communist Party of India (Marxist–Leninist)
Formation 12 November 1967 (1967-11-12)
Extinction 22 April 1969; 47 years ago (1969-04-22)
Region
Bihar, Karnataka, Kerala, Odisha, Punjab, Tamil Nadu, Uttar Pradesh, West Bengal
Methods Armed Struggle
Key people
Charu Majumdar, Kanu Sanyal, S Roy Chowdhury
Affiliations Communist Party of India (Marxist)
Slogan Lal Salaam
Mission Communism
Formerly called
All India Coordination Committee of Revolutionaries (AICCR)
Renamed from AICCR to AICCCR on 14 May 1968

All India Coordination Committee of Communist Revolutionaries was formed in 1967 as a pro-People's Republic of China splinter group of Communist Party of India (Marxist) (CPI(M)). Initially the group was known as AICCR of the CPI(M), and partially functioned as an inner-party fraction.[1]

AICCCR claimed that the Indian political situation was ripe for armed revolution and denounced participation in the Electoral Politics. The leaders of AICCCR were Charu Majumdar and Kanu Sanyal.

The first meeting if AICCCR in November 1967 was attended by the following persons:

After the Burdwan plenum of CPI(M) in April 1968 the group changed its name to just AICCCR.[1]

At the second meeting of AICCCR in May 1968 there Punjab was also represented.

In August 1968 Parimal Das Gupta broke away from AICCCR.

In September 1968 Andhra Pradesh Coordination Committee of Communist Revolutionaries joined AICCCR.

In February 1969 the Andhra Pradesh Coordination Committee of Communist Revolutionaries was expelled from AICCCR. Rapidly after the expulsion of APCCCR, AICCCR organized an Andhra State Coordination Committee with Tejeshwara Rao as the convenor. AICCCR mainly drew its support from the Srikakulam district.

On 22 April 1969 AICCCR formed the Communist Party of India (Marxist-Leninist).

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "History of Naxalism". Hindustan Times. Press Trust of India. 15 December 2005. Retrieved 10 August 2015.