Allan H. Goldman

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Allan H. Goldman
Born1943 (age 75–76)
NationalityAmerican
Net worth$3.0 billion (March 2017)[1]
Parent(s)Sol Goldman (1917–1987)
Lillian Schuman Goldman (1922–2002)
FamilyJane Goldman (sister)
Diane Goldman Kemper (sister)
Amy Goldman Fowler (sister)
Lloyd Goldman (cousin)

Allan H. Goldman (born 1943) is an American real estate investor and co-Chairman of the real estate investment company Solil Management.[1]

Biography[edit]

Goldman was born in 1943[2] to a Jewish family, the daughter of Lillian (née Schuman) and Sol Goldman.[3][4] He has three sisters: Jane Goldman, Diane Goldman Kemper, and Amy Goldman Fowler.[5] His father was the largest non-institutional real estate investor in New York City in the 1980s, owning a portfolio of nearly 1,900 commercial and residential properties.[5] After his father's death, his three sisters engaged in litigation with their mother over his father's assets; their mother subsequently received 1/3rd of their father's estate.[6] He and his sister, Jane Goldman, manage the remaining real estate assets via the firm Solil Management.[7] His cousin, Lloyd Goldman, is also a notable real-estate investor in New York City.[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Forbes: The World's Billionaires: "Allan H. Goldman" March 21, 2017
  2. ^ Forbes: "America's Richest Real Estate Family Doesn't Want You To Know Who They Are" by Chloe Sorvino June 29, 2016
  3. ^ New York Magazine: "The Midas Curse" by Dinitia Smith, p. 32, at Google Books April 3, 1989
  4. ^ New York Times: "Paid Notice: Deaths GOLDMAN, LILLIAN" August 22, 2002
  5. ^ a b "Sol Goldman, Major Real-Estate Investor, Dies". New York Times. October 19, 1987.
  6. ^ Keil, Jennifer Gould (January 2, 2008). "Looking Back: Sol Goldman, a mogul surrounded by turmoil". The Real Deal.
  7. ^ The Real Deal: "Sol Goldman’s $6B portfolio in play, as children accelerate dealmaking" By Adam Pincus April 01, 2013
  8. ^ "Meet the Other Trade Center Builder". Wall Street Journal. September 11, 2008.