Allen Apsley (administrator)

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Sir Allen Apsley
Born 1567
London, England
Died 24 May 1630
Spouse(s) Lucy St John
Children Allen Apsley
Lucy Hutchinson
Parent(s) Sir John Apsley
Elizabeth Shelly

Sir Allen Apsley (1567 – 24 May 1630) was an English merchant, courtier and landowner, lord of the manor of Feltwell.[1] and Naval administrator. He was Surveyor of Marine Victuals of the Royal Navy from 1612 to 1630.[2]

Biography[edit]

Born in London, England, Apsley was the son of the rich merchant Sir John Apsley of the City of London and his wife Elizabeth Shelly

Sir Allen Apsley was first knighted in Ireland, on 5 June 1605.[3]. On 31 January 1612 he was appointed joint Surveyor of Marine Victuals of the Royal Navy with Sir Marmaduke Darrell a post usually held for life and held that post until 24 May 1630 [4]. On 3 March 1617 Apsley was appointed Lieutenant of the Tower of London by King James I. Apsley's third wife was related by marriage to the Villiers family, and Apsley was considered to have won the appointment through the influence of the King's favourite, George Villiers, 1st Duke of Buckingham.[5]

In 1620, he was one of the founders of the New England Company.[6] He died on 24 May 1630.[6]

Family[edit]

On 23 October 1615, at the City of London church of St Ann Blackfriars, Apsley married Lucy, a daughter of Sir John St John of Lydiard Tregoze, Wiltshire, and his wife Lucy (daughter of Sir Walter Hungerford (Knight of Farley)[7]); and a sister of Sir John St John, 1st Baronet. They had two children:

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Allen Apsley or Allen Apslet (Burke 1884, p. 21)
  2. ^ Sainty, J.C. "Surveyor of Marine Victuals 1550-c. 1679 , Institute of Historical Research". history.ac.uk. Univeristy of London, January 2003. Retrieved 26 March 2017. 
  3. ^ Burke 1884, p. 21.
  4. ^ Sainty, J.C. "Surveyor of Marine Victuals 1550-c. 1679 , Institute of Historical Research". history.ac.uk. Univeristy of London, January 2003. Retrieved 26 March 2017. 
  5. ^ Round 2004.
  6. ^ a b New England Charter, at yale.edu
  7. ^ Burke 1866, p. 292.

References[edit]