John Fay (American football)

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John Fay
refer to caption
Fay pictured in Hilltop 1917, Marquette yearbook
Position:End
Personal information
Born:(1895-11-27)November 27, 1895
La Crosse, Wisconsin, U.S.
Died:March 14, 1983(1983-03-14) (aged 87)
La Crosse, Wisconsin, U.S.
Weight:175 lb (79 kg)
Career information
High school:Central
College:Marquette
Career history

John Carl (Doc) Fay, Sr. (November 27, 1895 – March 14, 1983) was an end in the National Football League who played for the Green Bay Packers.

Fay was born in La Crosse in 1895, and attended St. Mary's Catholic Grade School along with Central High School.[1] He graduated from Marquette University in Milwaukee in 1918, where he played football and basketball. He organized and captained the basketball teams of 1916 and 1917. Graduating in 1918 with a dentistry degree, Fay briefly practiced with a dental company in Georgia as an enlisted serviceman in World War I, then moved to Omaha, Nebraska, and finally to Menasha, Wisconsin, working as a dentist.[1] With the help of reporter George Whitney Calhoun, he was offered to and signed a contract with the Packers for 1922, earning $100 per game. He retired from professional football after that season.[2][3] He quit the dentistry profession, stating that he "didn't care for it" after two years of practice in Menosha, and worked for a wholesale furniture company until it folded during the Great Depression.[1] Fay was later a petroleum inspector for the State of Wisconsin. He retired in 1960 after a 27-year career. He was married to Mildred Waters and had two children.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "Petroleum Inspector To Retire On Nov. 30". The La Crosse Tribune. November 20, 1960. p. 11. Retrieved April 12, 2015 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  2. ^ Kidder, Joseph K. (December 29, 1962). "Fay Recalls Packer Start". The La Crosse Tribune. p. 5. Retrieved April 12, 2015 – via Newspapers.com. open access
  3. ^ "Doc Fay Statistics". Pro Football Reference. Archived from the original on 5 January 2009. Retrieved January 7, 2009.