Allen Neuringer

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Allen Neuringer is an American psychologist. He is a highly published and well regarded scientist in the field of the experimental analysis of behavior, as pioneered by B.F. Skinner.[not verified in body] His areas of research include human volition studies, the generation of randomness in organisms, self-experimentation, and many other areas.[not verified in body] He received his B.A. at Columbia College in 1962, and his PhD from Harvard University in 1967.[1] He served on National Institute of Health (NIH) and National Science Foundation (NSF) committees,[2] received numerous awards and grants for his research,[clarification needed][not verified in body] and has published widely.[3] As of June 2008, Dr. Neuringer retired as a professor of psychology at Reed College.[4]

Early life and education[edit]

Neuringer born ca. 1940. He received his B.A. at Columbia College. He did his PhD at Harvard University.[5]

Career[edit]

As of June 2008, Neuringer retired as a professor of psychology at Reed College.[citation needed]

He has also been an editor or assistant editor on four journals,[citation needed] and currently is an editor for the Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior (JEAB).[citation needed] He has been a reviewer on 23 journals, including Science and the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis.[citation needed]

He served on National Institute of Health (NIH) and National Science Foundation (NSF) committees.[clarification needed][citation needed]

Research interests[edit]

Neuringer is a social scientist in the field of the experimental analysis of behavior, as pioneered by B.F. Skinner.[citation needed] His areas of research include human volition studies, the generation of randomness in organisms, self-experimentation, and many other areas.[citation needed]

Randomness and behavior[edit]

Neuringer's work focused on the production of "pure randomness" in human and other organismic behavior, something that was widely considered impossible.[citation needed] Matching and reinforcing human and animal responses to a random number generator he was able to have humans and other organisms behave "randomly".[citation needed]

Melioration and self-experimentation[edit]

Dr. Neuringer has suggested that behavior analysis as a field might benefit from using experimental designs that explicitly and directly attempted to meliorate the condition of an experimental subject. He envisaged placing practical everyday goals as the objective of experiments and, especially, self-experiments.[citation needed]

Awards and recognition[edit]

Dr. Neuringer's work has received numerous NSF/NIMH grants.[citation needed]

Personal life[edit]

Dr. Neuringer, with his wife, live in a house they built in a forested area in the State of Oregon. [6]

Representative publications[edit]

  • Neuringer A (December 2004). "Reinforced variability in animals and people: implications for adaptive action". Am Psychol. 59 (9): 891–906. CiteSeerX 10.1.1.334.1772. doi:10.1037/0003-066X.59.9.891. PMID 15584823.
  • Neuringer A (December 2002). "Operant variability: evidence, functions, and theory". Psychon Bull Rev. 9 (4): 672–705. doi:10.3758/bf03196324. PMID 12613672.[permanent dead link]
  • Grunow A, Neuringer A (June 2002). "Learning to vary and varying to learn". Psychon Bull Rev. 9 (2): 250–8. doi:10.3758/bf03196279. PMID 12120786.[permanent dead link]
  • Vickrey C, Neuringer A (June 2000). "Pigeon reaction time, Hick's law, and intelligence". Psychon Bull Rev. 7 (2): 284–91. doi:10.3758/bf03212983. PMID 10909135.
  • Neuringer A (November 1984). "Melioration and self-experimentation". J Exp Anal Behav. 42 (3): 397–406. doi:10.1901/jeab.1984.42-397. PMC 1348111. PMID 16812398.

References[edit]

  1. ^ CV
  2. ^ CV
  3. ^ CV
  4. ^ CV
  5. ^ "Reed College | Dean of the Faculty | Faculty Profiles | Allen Neuringer". Archived from the original on 2018-01-12. Retrieved 2017-12-01.
  6. ^ Behavior Analysis History. "Interview with Dr. Neuringer". Youtube.com.

Further reading[edit]

Articles from published sources that may be of interest, in the expansion of this article, or for further exploration by readers, include the following.

Research related to behavioural response structures[edit]

Research related to musical recognition[edit]

Scholarly accounts[edit]

The following secondary source accounts appear about his animal research related to musical recognition, in 1984:

  • Watanabe, Shigeru (2012). "Animal Aesthetics form the Perspective of Comparative Cognition [Ch. 7]". In Watanabe, Shigeru & Kuczaj, Stan A. (eds.). Emotions of Animals and Humans: Comparative Perspectives. The Science of the Mind. Tokyo, JPN: Springer Science & Business. pp. 129–164, esp. 139. ISBN 978-4431541233. Retrieved 17 April 2016.CS1 maint: uses editors parameter (link)
  • Snowdon, Charles T.; Zimmerman, Elke & Altenmüller, Eckart (2015). "Music evolution and neuroscience [Ch. 2]". In Altenmüller, Eckart; Finger, Stanley & Boller, Francois (eds.). Music, Neurology, and Neuroscience: Evolution, the Musical Brain, Medical Conditions, and Therapies. Progress in Brain Research, Volume 217. Amsterdam, NLD: Elsevier. pp. 17–36, esp. 22. ISBN 978-0444635525. Retrieved 17 April 2016.CS1 maint: uses editors parameter (link)
  • North, Adrian C. & Hargreaves, David J. (2008). "Music preference and taste [Ch. 3]". The Social and Applied Psychology of Music. Oxford, ENG: Oxford University Press. pp. 75–142, esp. 121. ISBN 978-0191005008. Retrieved 17 April 2016.

Popular accounts[edit]

The following popular accounts appear about this same 1984 work:

Other matters[edit]

External links[edit]