Allen Wier

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Allen Wier (born September 9, 1946; pronounced "wire"),[1] is an American writer and a professor. He taught at the University of Tennessee from 2000 until 2003,[1] and the University of Alabama from 1980 to 1994.[2]

Biography[edit]

Wier was born on September 9, 1946 in San Antonio, Texas and spent parts of his childhood in Louisiana and Mexico.[citation needed] He attended Baylor University and received his BA degree; Louisiana State University and received his MA degree; and Bowling Green University received his MFA degree.[when?][citation needed]

He taught at the University of Tennessee from 2000 until 2003,[1] and the University of Alabama from 1980 to 1994.[2] Additionally teaching at Longwood College, Carnegie-Mellon University, Hollins College, University of Texas, Florida International University, and Murray State University.

In 2003, Wier was inducted into the Fellowship of Southern Writers, along with Barry Hannah and Yusef Komunyakaa. He is widely published in anthologies and periodicals, including The New York Times, Ploughshares, and The Southern Review. Wier was previously married to the poet Dara Wier.

Awards and honors[edit]

Bibliography[edit]

Books[edit]

  • Wier, Allen (1978). Blanco. Louisiana State University (LSU) Press. ISBN 9780807104736.
  • Wier, Allen (1978). Things About to Disappear: Stories. Louisiana State University (LSU) Press. ISBN 9780807104712.
  • Wier, Allen (1983). Departing as Air: A Novel. Simon and Schuster. ISBN 9780671433079.
  • Wier, Allen (1989). A Place for Outlaws. Harper & Row. ISBN 9780060161132.
  • Wier, Allen (2006). Tehano: A Novel. Southern Methodist University Press. ISBN 9780870745065.

Other publications[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "Wier, Allen 1946–". Encyclopedia.com. Retrieved 2021-05-21.
  2. ^ a b Cobb, Mark Hughes. "Former UA professor Allen Wier to receive Truman Capote Prize at virtual Monroeville Literary Festival". Tuscaloosa News. Retrieved 2021-05-21.
  3. ^ a b c d e f "Allen Wier - Fiction". Alabama Writers' Forum. Retrieved 2021-05-21.
  4. ^ "Wier, Allen". Fellowship of Southern Writers. Retrieved 2021-05-21.
  5. ^ "Allen Wier". John Simon Guggenheim Foundation. Retrieved 2021-05-21.

External links[edit]