Although of Course You End Up Becoming Yourself

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Although of Course You End Up Becoming Yourself
Although Of Course.jpg
First edition
AuthorDavid Lipsky
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish
PublisherBroadway Books
Publication date
April 13, 2010
Media typePrint
Pages352
ISBN0-307-59243-X

Although Of Course You End Up Becoming Yourself: A Road Trip with David Foster Wallace is a 2010 memoir by David Lipsky, about a five-day road trip with the author David Foster Wallace. It is based upon a Rolling Stone magazine story that received the National Magazine Award.[1]

Lipsky, a novelist and contributing editor at Rolling Stone magazine, recounts his time spent with the author of Infinite Jest at the moment when Wallace realized his work would bring him fame, and that this would change his life. The book was a National Public Radio Best Book of the Year,[2] a New York Times Book Review Editors' Choice,[3] and a New York Times bestseller.[4]

A feature film adaptation entitled The End of the Tour was released in July 2015. The film has a 92% "Certified Fresh" rating on Rotten Tomatoes, based on 159 reviews.[5] The film also holds a score of 82 out of 100 on Metacritic, based on 35 reviews, indicating "universal acclaim."[6]

Story[edit]

Lipsky, who received a National Magazine Award for writing about Wallace in 2009, here provides the transcript of, and commentary about, his time accompanying Wallace across the country just as Wallace was completing an extensive "book tour" promoting his novel, Infinite Jest. The format captures almost every moment the two spent together – on planes and cars, across the country — during the specific time period when Wallace was becoming famous; the writers discuss literature, popular music and film, depression, the appeals and pitfalls of fame, dog ownership, and many other topics.[7]

Reception[edit]

Although of Course You End Up Becoming Yourself was positively received by critics. In Time magazine, Lev Grossman wrote, "The transcript of their brilliant conversations reads like a two-man Tom Stoppard play or a four-handed duet scored for typewriter."[8] The Atlantic Monthly called the work, "far-reaching, insightful, very funny, profound, surprising, and awfully human";[9] at National Public Radio, Michael Schaub described the book as "a startlingly sad yet deeply funny postscript to the career of one of the most interesting American writers of all time", calling it "crushingly poignant, both endearing and fascinating. At the end, it feels like you've listened to two good friends talk about life, about literature, about all of their mutual loves".[10] Newsweek noted, "For readers unfamiliar with the sometimes intimidating Wallace oeuvre, Lipsky has provided a conversational entry point into the writer's thought process. It's odd to think that a book about Wallace could serve both the newbies and the hard-cores, but here it is."[11] Publishers Weekly, in a starred review, described the book as "a rollicking dialog ... a candid and fascinating glimpse into a uniquely brilliant and very troubled writer."[12] The Wall Street Journal called it "lovely",[13] and Laura Miller in Salon described it as "exhilarating".[14] Maria Bustillos, in an essay for The Awl, wrote, "I can't tell you how much fun this book is ... It's a road picture, a love story, a contest: two talented, brilliant young men with literary ambitions, and their struggle to understand one another."[15] "Spurred by a rapidly developing feeling of friendship toward Lipsky," wrote critic Richard Brody in The New Yorker, "Wallace speaks of himself with a profuse, almost therapeutic candor, delivering a spoken autobiography ... In Lipsky's book, Wallace’s voice is startlingly present, but so are his ideas, his immediate emotional responses to circumstances, and his own complex range of perspectives on the circumstances at hand ... His remarks to Lipsky are as quietly hilarious as they are ingenious."[16]

The book was a New York Times bestseller, New York Times Editors' Choice, and a National Public Radio Best Book of the Year.[17]

The End of the Tour[edit]

A feature film adaptation of Although of Course You End Up Becoming Yourself, The End of the Tour, was released in July 2015, with Academy Award-nominated actor Jesse Eisenberg portraying Lipsky and Jason Segel portraying Wallace. In his review for The New York Times, critic A.O. Scott wrote, "I love it," adding, "You hang on its every word and revel in its rough, vernacular beauty . . . There will always be films about writers and writing, and this one is just about as good as it gets."[18]

The film received a 92% "Certified Fresh" rating on Rotten Tomatoes, based on 159 reviews, with an average rating of 8.02/10. The site's critical consensus states: "Brilliantly performed and smartly unconventional, The End of the Tour pays fitting tribute to a singular talent while offering profoundly poignant observations on the human condition."[5] The film also holds a score of 82 out of 100 on Metacritic, based on 35 reviews, indicating "universal acclaim."[19] At Rogerebert.com, critic Brian Tallerico called the film a "joy," and "stunning . . .a gift of highly intellectual discussion between two brilliant people at turning points in their lives," while also praising Jason Segel and Jesse Eisenberg.[20]

The Washington Post's Ann Hornaday gave the film four out of four stars and called it, "A five-day conversation you won't want to end ... Part love story, part road trip, part elegy to a bygone, pre-9/11 age, 'The End of the Tour' brims with compassion and sharply honed insight" about "what it means to be human."[21] In his review for Vanity Fair, Richard Lawson called it a "wise, humbly sublime film ... a profound, and profoundly affecting, movie, one that had me blubbering with happy-sad tears. What a pleasure to spend two hours in its company."[22]

In his review for the New York Daily News, Joe Neumaier awarded the film five out of five stars, calling it "one of the best movies of the year . . . Director James Ponsoldt's smart, incisive and extraordinary drama is the kind of film that burrows into your head and leaves you illuminated about life and how to live it."[23] In her review for the Los Angeles Times, Sheri Linden wrote "James Ponsoldt's magnificent The End of the Tour gives us two guys talking, and the effect is breathtaking."[24]

In his review in the New York Post, Kyle Smith gave the film four of four stars, writing, "The End of the Tour is the best movie you’ll see this summer. . . It's a glory. . . See it with your best friend."[25] In his review for Cut Print Film, Josh Oakley awarded the film a perfect "10/10", calling it "one of the best films of the year", and stating "The End of the Tour presents, with ample evidence, Wallace as a figure who could never fill the holes of loneliness with the spackle of acclaim."[26] In his review for the Chicago Sun-Times, Richard Roeper awarded the film four out of four stars, calling it "brilliant. . .this is one of the best movies of the year."[27] In his review for the Minnesota Star Tribune Colin Covert gave the film four out of four stars, writing, "Simply put, it is a masterwork."[28]

The film featured in numerous "Best of 2015" lists, including The New York Times,[29] Vanity Fair,[30] Vogue,[31] The Guardian,[32] Entertainment Weekly,[33] USA Today,[34] Variety,[35] The Washington Post,[36] The New York Post,[37] Huffington Post,[38] Wired,[39] and The New Republic.[40]

Honors[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ The New York Times, "The Winners," May 1, 2009.
  2. ^ "NPR Best Books of 2010". NPR.org. 2010.
  3. ^ "Editors' Choice, June 6, 2010". The New York Times Book Review.
  4. ^ "Best Sellers, April 26, 2010". The New York Times Book Review.
  5. ^ a b "The End of the Tour (2015)". Rotten Tomatoes. Archived from the original on September 20, 2019. Retrieved January 18, 2021.
  6. ^ "The End of the Tour". Metacritic. Archived from the original on July 7, 2018. Retrieved 18 January 2021.
  7. ^ Schaub, Michael Schaub (May 4, 2010). "A Not-So-Brief Interview With David Foster Wallace". NPR.
  8. ^ Grossman, Lev (April 16, 2010). "Although of Course You End Up Becoming Yourself". TIME.
  9. ^ Kaiser, Menachem (April 22, 2010). "The Challenge of Writing About David Foster Wallace". The Atlantic.
  10. ^ Schaub, Michael (May 7, 2010). "A Not-So-Brief Interview With David Foster Wallace". NPR. Retrieved 2010-05-07.
  11. ^ Wallis, Seth Colter (April 22, 2010). "My Dinners With David". Newsweek.
  12. ^ "Although of Course You End Up Becoming Yourself". Publishers Weekly. April 4, 2010.
  13. ^ Sam Sacks (August 29, 2012). "Irony and Its Discontent". The Wall Street Journal.
  14. ^ Miller, Laura (April 4, 2010). "Road Trip With David Foster Wallace". Salon. Retrieved 2010-05-07.
  15. ^ Bustillos, Maria (March 22, 2010). "Booked Up: 'Although of Course You End Up Becoming Yourself: a Road Trip with David Foster Wallace". The Awl.
  16. ^ Brody, Richard (August 5, 2015). "David Foster Wallace Isn't Just Like Us". The New Yorker. Retrieved 2021-01-18.
  17. ^ "NPR Best Books of 2010". NPR.org. 2010.
  18. ^ Scott, A.O. (July 31, 2015). "'The End of the Tour' Offers A Tale of Two Davids". The New York Times. Archived from the original on December 6, 2016. Retrieved 2021-01-18.
  19. ^ "The End of the Tour". Metacritic. Archived from the original on July 7, 2018. Retrieved 18 January 2021.
  20. ^ Tallerico, Brian (January 24, 2015). "The End of the Tour". Rogerebert.com. Archived from the original on January 7, 2019. Retrieved 2015-08-07.
  21. ^ Hornaday, Ann (August 6, 2015). "'The End of the Tour,' a five-day conversation you won't want to end". Washington Post. Archived from the original on December 7, 2017. Retrieved 2015-08-08.
  22. ^ Lawson, Richard (January 25, 2015). "'The End of the Tour Is a Deeply Affecting Tribute to a Cherished Writer, and a Huge Breakthrough for Jason Segel". Vanity Fair. Archived from the original on January 3, 2020. Retrieved 2015-08-07.
  23. ^ Neumaier, Joe (July 27, 2015). "'The End of the Tour' review: One of the year's top films, with Jason Segel brilliant as author David Foster Wallace". New York Daily News. Archived from the original on July 30, 2015. Retrieved 2015-08-07.
  24. ^ Linden, Sheri (July 30, 2015). "'The End of the Tour' is a riveting road-trip conversation with David Foster Wallace". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on December 30, 2019. Retrieved 2015-08-08.
  25. ^ Smith, Kyle (July 29, 2015). "'The End of the Tour' is the best movie you'll see this summer". New York Post. Archived from the original on December 7, 2017. Retrieved 2015-08-08.
  26. ^ Oakley, Josh (July 30, 2015). "The End of the Tour". Cut Print Film. Archived from the original on August 6, 2015. Retrieved 2015-08-08.
  27. ^ Roeper, Richard (August 6, 2015). "'The End of the Tour': Infinitely impressed by Jason Segel". Chicago Sun-Times. Archived from the original on August 10, 2015. Retrieved 2015-08-21.
  28. ^ Covert, Colin (August 6, 2015). "Jason Segel mesmerizes as David Foster Wallace in 'The End of the Tour'". Minnesota Star Tribune. Archived from the original on October 25, 2015. Retrieved January 19, 2021.
  29. ^ "Manohla Dargis, A. O. Scott, Stephen Holden, "The Best Movies of 2015," The New York Times, December 9, 2015". Archived from the original on November 19, 2016. Retrieved January 18, 2021.
  30. ^ "Richard Lawson, "The 10 Best Movies of 2015," Vanity Fair, December 7, 2015". Archived from the original on July 18, 2017. Retrieved January 18, 2021.
  31. ^ "John Powers, "The 10 Best Movies of 2015," Vogue, December 10, 2015". Archived from the original on December 15, 2015. Retrieved January 18, 2021.
  32. ^ ""The 50 best films of 2015 in the US: the full list," The Guardian, December 4, 2015". Archived from the original on December 11, 2016. Retrieved January 18, 2021.
  33. ^ "Ariana Bacle, "Best of 2015 (Behind the Scenes)," Entertainment Weekly, December 9, 2015". Archived from the original on December 7, 2016. Retrieved January 18, 2021.
  34. ^ ""The 10 best movies of 2015," USA Today, December 14, 2015". Archived from the original on December 17, 2015. Retrieved January 18, 2021.
  35. ^ "Ramin Setoodeh, "The 13 Most Underrated Movies of 2015," Variety, December 28, 2015". Archived from the original on December 21, 2017. Retrieved January 18, 2021.
  36. ^ "Ann Hornaday, "The Best Movies of 2015," The Washington Post, December 8, 2015". Archived from the original on December 29, 2015. Retrieved January 18, 2021.
  37. ^ "Kyle Smith, "Best of 2015," The New York Post, December 18, 2015". Archived from the original on October 8, 2017. Retrieved January 18, 2021.
  38. ^ "Matthew Jacobs, "The 23 Best Performances Of 2015 Across Pop Culture," The Huffington Post, December 21, 2015". Archived from the original on January 13, 2016. Retrieved January 18, 2021.
  39. ^ "Wired Staff, "The 10 Best Movies You Probably Didn't See in 2015," Wired, December 23, 2015". Archived from the original on December 28, 2016. Retrieved January 18, 2021.
  40. ^ "Tim Grierson, "Tim Grierson's Top Ten Films of 2015," The New Republic. December 30, 2015". Archived from the original on January 5, 2016. Retrieved January 18, 2021.

External links[edit]