Altos 586

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Altos 586
Type Microcomputer
Release date 1983 (1983)
Introductory price 7 990 - 10 990 USD
(circa 19,200 - 26,400 USD today)
Media 1 MB floppy drive
Operating system Xenix or MP/M-86
Memory 512 kB to 1 MB RAM, 12 / 32 / 42 MB Hard drive
Connectivity 8x RS-232C Serial Port, expandable to 16; Parallel printer port

The Altos 586 was a multi-user microcomputer intended for the business market. It was introduced by Altos Computer Systems in 1983.[1] A configuration with 512 kB of RAM, an Intel 8086 processor, Microsoft Xenix, and 10 MB hard drive cost about 8 000 USD.[2] 3Com offered this Altos 586 product as a file server for their IBM PC networking solution in spring 1983.[citation needed] The network was 10Base-2 (thin-net) based, with an Ethernet AUI port on the Altos 586.

Reception[edit]

BYTE in August 1984 called the Altos 586 "an excellent multiuser UNIX system", with "the best performance" for the price among small Unix systems. The magazine reported that a US$10,000 (equivalent to $23,053 in 2016) Altos with 512 kB RAM and 40 MB hard drive "under moderate load approaches DEC VAX performance for most tasks that a user would normally invoke".[3] A longer review in March 1985 stated that "despite some bugs, it's a good product". It criticized the documentation and lack of customer service for developers, but praised the multiuser performance. The author reported that his 586 had run a multiuser bulletin board system 24 hours a day for more than two years with no hardware failures. He concluded that "Very few UNIX or XENIX computers can provide all of the features of the 586 for $8990", especially for multiuser turnkey business users.[4]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Halamka, John (7 November 1983), "Review: Altos 586", InfoWorld, Vol. 5 (No. 45): 89–90 
  2. ^ Yates, Jean L. (October 1983). "Unix and the Standardization of Small Computer Systems". BYTE. pp. 160–166. Retrieved 30 January 2015. 
  3. ^ Hinnant, David F. (Aug 1984). "Benchmarking UNIX Systems". BYTE. pp. 132–135, 400–409. Retrieved 23 February 2016. 
  4. ^ Corson, Greg (March 1985). "The Altos 586 with the XENIX Development System". BYTE. p. 247. Retrieved 19 March 2016. 
  5. ^ "Whole Earth Software Catalog". You can now buy extremely fast UNIX systems that support multiple users for less than $10,000, including the new Fortune XP 20, the Altos 586, and the Tandy Model 16.