Amable Berthelot

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Amable Berthelot (February 10, 1777 – November 24, 1847) was a Quebec lawyer, author and political figure.

He was born in Quebec City in 1777, the son of Michel-Amable Berthelot Dartigny, and studied at the Petit Séminaire de Québec. He articled in law with Jean-Antoine Panet, was admitted to the bar in 1799 and set up practice at Trois-Rivières. Berthelot served as a captain in the local militia during the War of 1812. He was also elected to the Legislative Assembly of Lower Canada in 1814 for Trois-Rivières. He closed his office in 1820 and lived in France until 1824 when he returned to Lower Canada. He was elected again for Trois-Rivières in that year as a member of the Parti canadien. He left for France again in 1831 and returned to Quebec City in 1834. Because he sold his books before departing for France, his personal library was known to consist of almost fifteen hundred volumes. He was elected to represent Quebec City's Upper Town in the legislative assembly and served until 1838. After the union of Upper and Lower Canada, he represented Kamouraska in the Legislative Assembly from 1841 until his death at Quebec City in 1847.

Berthelot published some essays on French grammar and a number of essays on the subject of historical archaeology.

His adopted daughter Adèle married Louis Hippolyte LaFontaine.

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Political offices
Preceded by
Thomas Coffin, Tory
Mathew Bell, Tory
MLA, District of Trois-Rivières
with Charles Richard Ogden, Tory

1814–1816
Succeeded by
Pierre Vézina, Tory
Charles Richard Ogden, Tory
Preceded by
Joseph Badeaux, Tory
Charles Richard Ogden, Tory
MLA, District of Trois-Rivières
with Étienne Ranvoyzé, Parti Canadien
Charles Richard Ogden, Tory

1824–1827
Succeeded by
Pierre-Benjamin Dumoulin, Parti Canadien
Charles Richard Ogden, Tory