Amanda Hopkinson

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Amanda Hopkinson (born 1948) is a British scholar and literary translator.[1] She was born in London to the British journalist and magazine editor Sir Tom Hopkinson and photographer Gerti Deutsch.[2] She gained a BA from University of Warwick in 1970 and has a PhD from Oxford University.[2]

During her academic career, Hopkinson has taught at City University, Manchester University, the University of East Anglia, the University of East London, Westminster University and Cardiff University. As a translator, she is best known for her English versions of contemporary Latin American literature. She has also translated several works by the French crime writer Dominique Manotti. In this work, she frequently collaborates with fellow translators Nick Caistor and Ros Schwartz.

Hopkinson is additionally a writer on photography. She has published monographs on Julia Margaret Cameron, Martin Chambi and Manuel Alvarez Bravo, and she has further written or edited a number of books on photography and photojournalism. She has also written the obituaries of numerous photographers for The Guardian newspaper.[3] Hopkinson lives in Norwich, and is married to fellow translator Nick Caistor.[4]

Selected translations[edit]

Works on Photography[edit]

  • 150 Years of Photo Journalism
  • Manuel Alvarez Bravo
  • Martin Chambi
  • Julia Margaret Cameron
  • Between Ourselves: The Photographs of Mari Mahr
  • Contemporary Photographers
  • Desires and Disguises: Latin American Women Photographers
  • Five Pioneers of Photography
  • Hidden View: Images of Bahia, Brazil
  • Photographs by Gerti Deutsch 1908–1979
  • Rehearsal: Photographs of Dance
  • Sixties London: Photographs by Dorothy Bohm

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Amanda Hopkinson | Arcadia Books". arcadiabooks.co.uk. Retrieved 2016-01-20. 
  2. ^ a b "Contemporary Authors Online". Biography in Context. Gale. 2006. Retrieved 2016-01-21. 
  3. ^ "Amanda Hopkinson | The Guardian". theguardian.com. Retrieved 2016-01-20. 
  4. ^ "Nick Caistor, Non-fiction writer, Translator". Royal Literary Fund. Retrieved 2014-10-16.