Call signs in Russia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Call signs in Russia are unique identifiers for telecommunications and broadcasting. Call signs are regulated internationally by the ITU as well as nationally by Ministry of Communications and Mass Media of the Russian Federation. The latter is responsible for providing policy on the allocation of Russia's radio spectrum to support efficient, reliable and responsive wireless telecommunications and broadcasting infrastructure.[1]

In 1991 Russia inherited the largest portion of the former Soviet Union's allocated call signs. The other post-USSR countries which inherited parts of the ITU UAA–UZZ call sign block are Uzbekistan, Kazakhstan, and Ukraine.

Call sign blocks for telecommunication[edit]

The International Telecommunication Union has assigned Russia the following call sign blocks for all radio communication, broadcasting or transmission:[2]

Call sign block
RAA–RZZ Russia
UAA–UIZ Russia

While not directly related to call signs, the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) further has divided all countries assigned amateur radio prefixes into three regions; Russia is located in ITU Region 1.

Call sign assignments for amateur radio[edit]

Amateur radio or ham radio call signs are unique identifiers for the 24,000 licensed operators.

Russia uses the following 1-letter and 2-letter prefixes in amateur radio call signs for normal operation: R, RA, RK, RN, RU, RV, RW, RX, RZ, and UA. Any of these prefixes can be used in any of the Oblasts. The other prefixes are reserved for special operation.

It uses the numerals 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, and Ø to separate prefixes from suffixes, and to indicate in which of the six regions the amateur was assigned the call sign.

Russia designates the first letter of the suffix to designate the Oblast within the region. This means that for most call signs the numeral and first letter of the suffix identifies the operator in one of the 92 Russian Oblasts.

Table of call sign allocations (numeral and first letter of suffix)
Northwest Russia Central Russia Volga River North Caucasus Urals & West Siberia East Siberia & Far East
1A
1C
1D
1N
1O
1P
1Q
1T
1W
1Y
2F
Saint Petersburg
Leningrad
Saint Petersburg
Karelia
Arkhangelsk
Nenets
Vologda
Novgorod
Pskov
Murmansk
Kaliningrad
3A
3D
3E
3F
3G
3H
3I
3L
3M
3N
3P
3Q
3R
3S
3T
3U
3V
3W
3X
3Y
3Z
Moscow
Moskovskaya
Oryol
Moscow
Lipetsk
Moscow
Tver
Smolensk
Yaroslavl
Kostroma
Tula
Voronezh
Tambov
Ryazan
Nizhny Novgorod
Ivanovo
Vladimir
Kursk
Kaluga
Bryansk
Belgorod
4A
4C
4F
4H
4L
4N
4P
4S
4U
4W
4Y
Volgograd
Saratov
Penza
Samara
Ulyanovsk
Kirov
Tatarstan
Mari El
Mordovia
Udmurtia
Chuvashia
6A
6E
6F
6I
6J
6K
6L
6P
6Q
7R
6U
6W
6X
6Y
Krasnodar
Karachay–Cherkessia
Stavropol
Kalmykia
North Ossetia–Alania
Crimea
Rostov
Chechnya
Ingushetia
Sevastopol
Astrakhan
Dagestan
Kabardino-Balkaria
Adygea
9A
9C
9F
9H
9J
9K
9L
9M
9O
9Q
9S
9U
9W
9X
9Y
9Z
Chelyabinsk
Sverdlovsk
Perm
Tomsk
Khanty–Mansi
Yamalo-Nenets
Tyumen
Omsk
Novosibirsk
Kurgan
Orenburg
Kemerovo
Bashkortostan
Komi
Altai Krai
Altai Republic
0A
0C
0D
0E
0I
0J
0K
0L
0O
0Q
0S
0U
0W
0Y
0Z
Krasnoyarsk
Khabarovsk
Jewish
Sakhalin
Magadan
Amur
Chukotka
Primorskiy
Buryatia
Sakha
Irkutsk
Zabaykalsky
Khakassia
Tuva
Kamchatka
Russia's amateur callsign number regions

Combinations not listed are used by radio amateurs in the federal subject next to the listed combination immediately preceding it in the sort order; e.g., the 1B combination is used by radio amateurs in Saint Petersburg. Since 2010, call signs in the '3' region can also be issued with the numerals 2 and 5; in the '6' region with numeral 7; and in the '9' region with numeral 8. [3]

Special call signs[edit]

  • The second letter in a suffix: W, X, Y, Z – Club stations
  • U1–4, 6, 9–0 World War II veterans
  • U1MIR–U9MIR cosmonauts
  • RI1ANA–RI1ANZ, RA00ANT–RI99ANT Antarctica [4]
  • RI1FJA–RI1FJZ Franz Josef Land (Arctic)
  • R1MVA–R1MVZ Maly Vysotsky Island (ex-4J1.)
  • RA2, UA2–UI2 (F or K next letter) Kaliningrad Oblast
  • R3ARES – Russian amateur radio emergency service H.Q (RARES), Moscow.
  • RE0RAS – RARES, Regional service. Central Siberia, Krasnoyarsk.
  • R3ARC – H.Q. Rescue service of Russian Red Cross. Moscow.
  • R3RRC – "Russian Robinson Club" H.Q. Lipetsk city (R3G area).
  • R3SRR – Russian Amateur Radio Union H.Q. Moscow.
  • R3VHF – VHF Committee of Russian Amateur Radio Union.
  • RS0ISS – Cosmonauts on the International Space Station.

History of call sign allocation[edit]

Russia was not a signatory to the 1913 Berlin agreement but received the R block series. Amateur radio was not yet developed enough to be subject to this identification scheme.

In 1927 the International Telecommunication Union Conference in Washington (D.C., USA) established internally agreed upon call sign prefixes – Russia was now in the USSR and the latter was assigned the RAA–RZZ block.

At the 1947 Atlantic City ITU Conference, the USSR was assigned the following call sign blocks:

Call sign block 1947 Assignment Present assignment
DRA–DTZ Bielorussian Soviet Socialist Republic Germany (DR), Korea (DS–DT)
EKA–EKZ Union of Soviet Socialist Republics Armenia
EMA–EOZ Union of Soviet Socialist Republics Ukraine (EM–EO)
ERA–ERZ Union of Soviet Socialist Republics Moldova
ESA–ESZ Estonian SSR Estonia
EUA–EZZ Union of Soviet Socialist Republics Belarus (EU–EY), Turkmenistan (EZ)
LYA–LYZ Lithuanian SSR Lithuania
RAA–RZZ Union of Soviet Socialist Republics Russia
UAA–UQZ Union of Soviet Socialist Republics Russia (UA–UI), Uzbekistan (UJ–UM), Kazakhstan (UN–UQ)
URA–UTZ Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic Ukraine (UR–UZ)
UUA–UZZ Union of Soviet Socialist Republics Ukraine
YLA–YLZ Latvian SSR Latvia
4JA–4LZ Union of Soviet Socialist Republics Azerbaijan (4J–4K), Georgia (4L)

As of 2010, several call sign codes were deleted or merged following the merger of the corresponding entity with a neighbouring subject of the Russian Federation between 2005 and 2008:[5]

Japan/USSR Disputed areas – WWII[edit]

Sakhalin Island has been disputed between Russia/USSR and Japan since the mid-19th century. From 1905 until after World War II, South Sakhalin Island was under Japanese control and was assigned the JP7 call sign prefix for radio purposes. From 1945 until the present the call sign prefix for all of Sahalin Island is UA0, with F as the first letter of the suffix. The Japan-Soviet Joint Declaration of 1956 laid down that Habomai Is. and Shikotan I. should be returnable to Japan, but Russia is still the administrative authority in the Four Northern Islands.[6]

Germany/USSR Disputed areas – WWII[edit]

While not strictly a Russian call sign issue, following World War II, Byelorussia inherited the DR–DT block at the Atlantic City Conference from the German D-block.[7] The block was then transferred back to Germany, and the DS–DT block subsequently given to South Korea.

See also[edit]

References[edit]