Amedee Army Airfield

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Amedee Army Airfield
Reno Army Air Base Auxiliary Flight Strip
Amedee AAF.png
Aerial photo of runway
Amedee Army Airfield - California.jpg
2006 USGS airphoto
Summary
Airport typeMilitary
OwnerU.S. Army, ATCA-ASO
LocationSierra Army Depot, near Herlong, California
Built1942
Elevation AMSL4,012 ft / 1,223 m
Coordinates40°15′57″N 120°09′02″W / 40.26583°N 120.15056°W / 40.26583; -120.15056Coordinates: 40°15′57″N 120°09′02″W / 40.26583°N 120.15056°W / 40.26583; -120.15056
Map
KAHC is located in California
KAHC
KAHC
Location of Amedee Army Airfield
KAHC is located in the United States
KAHC
KAHC
KAHC (the United States)
Runways
Direction Length Surface
ft m
8/26 10,000 3,048 Asphalt

Amedee Army Airfield (IATA: AHC, ICAO: KAHC, FAA LID: AHC) is a military use airport located nine nautical miles (17 km) north of the central business district of Herlong, in Lassen County, California, United States.[1] It is owned by the United States Army[1] and located at the Sierra Army Depot in the Honey Lake Valley, east of the Sierra Nevada mountain range.[2]

History[edit]

The airfield was built by the United States Army Air Forces about 1942, and was known as Reno Army Air Base Auxiliary Flight Strip. It was an emergency landing airfield for military aircraft on training flights. After World War II, the airfield was retained by the Army, and is used as part of the Sierra Army Depot. It was also known as Honey Lake Flight Strip.[3][4]

Facilities[edit]

Amedee AAF has one runway designated 8/26 with an asphalt surface measuring 10,000 by 150 feet (3,048 x 46 m).[1]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Public Domain This article incorporates public domain material from the Air Force Historical Research Agency.

  1. ^ a b c d FAA Airport Form 5010 for AHC PDF. Federal Aviation Administration. Effective 3 June 2010.
  2. ^ "Sierra Army Depot / Amedee Airfield". GlobalSecurity.org. Retrieved 23 June 2010.
  3. ^ Public Domain This article incorporates public domain material from the Air Force Historical Research Agency.
  4. ^ Shaw, Frederick J. (2004), Locating Air Force Base Sites History’s Legacy, Air Force History and Museums Program, United States Air Force, Washington DC, 2004.

External links[edit]