American Embassy School

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American Embassy School
Address
American Embassy School, Chandragupta Marg, Chanakyapuri
New Delhi, Delhi 110021
India
Coordinates 28°35′57.15″N 77°10′56.25″E / 28.5992083°N 77.1822917°E / 28.5992083; 77.1822917Coordinates: 28°35′57.15″N 77°10′56.25″E / 28.5992083°N 77.1822917°E / 28.5992083; 77.1822917
Information
Type Independent
Established 1952
Head of School Ms. Ellen Stern
Faculty 146
122 full-time
24 part-time
Grades KG-12
Number of students 1,196 (2016)
524 5PK-grade 5
322 middle
350 high
Average class size >12 students upper
18 students middle
Campus Suburban
Color(s) Black and gold         
Mascot tiger
Annual tuition $18,020-$29,598
Website

The American Embassy School, South Delhi, India, is an independent, co-educational day school which offers an educational program from prekindergarten through Grade 12. The school was founded in 1952. Its English-language motto is "Enter to Learn, Leave to Serve," while its Latin motto is "Domi ac foris," meaning "At home and abroad."


Admission and demographics[edit]

AES ensures that seats are available for US citizens, provided the applicant meets the school's eligibility criteria. Eligibility in all other cases is limited to children whose parents or legal guardians hold a foreign passport, are temporarily residing in India and based in New Delhi, and the student lives with the parent or legal guardian. An Indian citizen applicant must meet all three of the following criteria to be eligible to apply for admission:

  • the parents of the student are likely to stay in India for a period of 2 to 3 years,
  • the student should have come from an American/international system of education (outside of India with the exception of the American School of Bombay and the American International School of Chennai) and has to return to the American/international system of education,
  • the student is in a critical stage of education and studying in the AES is important for the student’s education. The American Embassy School defines ‘critical stage of education’ as Grades 9-12. 39 percent of the school's 1200 students in Pre-School to Grade 12 are Americans, the majority of students represent 53 nationalities. The interim school director for 2016-17 is Ellen Stern, and James Laney will be school director beginning in 2017-18.

For the 2016-17 school year, enrollment is just under 1200 in PK-Grade 12 and there are 187 faculty members.

Organization[edit]

The school is governed by a nine-member Board of Governors, seven of whom are elected for two-year terms by the American Embassy School Association of New Delhi, with an additional two non-voting US Embassy Representatives. There are also non-voting representatives from the faculty and student body.

Curriculum[edit]

The curriculum is that of general academic, college-preparatory school. The school's testing program includes the College Board and American College Testing tests. Instruction is in English. French, Spanish, and Mandarin are taught as foreign languages. English-as-an Additional Language services are offered for non-native English speakers. The school also offers the International Baccalaureate Diploma and Advanced Placement courses. Most of the graduates go on to universities in the United States and other countries. The school is accredited by the Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools.

Facilities[edit]

The school includes two libraries, one swimming pool (plus a diving pool and toddler pool), a physical education center, computer labs, playgrounds, tennis courts, soccer pitches, and a performing arts center (including a full sized theater). The school campus is spread over almost 13 acres.

School activities and Sports[edit]

Extracurricular activities include sports, performing arts, dance, visual arts, academic games, MUN(Model the United Nations) and other interests such as chess and climbing. The school is a member of MESAC (Middle East South Asia Conference) for Grades 8-12 and ASIAC (American Schools in India Activities Conference) for Grades 6-8.

The American Embassy School used to be part of The South Asian Inter-Scholastic Association (SAISA). During this time they were known as the AES Falcons and the school colors were red and white.

The school's community goals are also realized through extra activities. The Reach Out program enables students to interact with people from the "jugghi" or slums near the school. In this, the school has helped construct and staff a library, and studying area to promote literacy. The students may also participate in Salaam Delhi, Amnesty International, Habitat for Humanity, Operation Smile, and other community services.

Technology[edit]

Nearly every classroom has a ceiling-mounted projector and a SmartBoard interactive whiteboard. There are cameras, digital microscopes, digital cameras, data probes, video cameras, audio recording devices, GPS devices and scanners.

The school offers a 1:1 program for students in K-12. Grades K-8 use iPads, and students in Grades 6-8 may take them home. Students in Grades 9-12 use laptops. The school also has a Middle School MakerSpace and will open an Elementary MakerSpace and a High School MakerSpace for the 2017-18 school year.

Library[edit]

AES has a large library with over 30,000 fiction, non fiction and reference books, 138 magazines and 2400 videos.

Notable alumni[edit]

Controversy[edit]

In January 2014 the school was placed under investigation by the Indian government for alleged tax and visa fraud by its faculty. A report in the New York Times described a handout provided by the school to new teachers which instructs how to lie on Indian visa application forms to circumvent the need for a work permit, and to avoid paying income tax.[3] The Indian investigation followed the Devyani Khobragade incident in the United States. [3]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.accessmylibrary.com/coms2/summary_0286-13919437_ITM
  2. ^ http://india.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/10/09/geithner-meets-chidambaram-in-delhi/
  3. ^ a b https://www.nytimes.com/2014/01/16/world/asia/indian-school-ensnared-in-us-diplomatic-row.html?hpw&rref=education&_r=0

External links[edit]