American Guild of Musical Artists

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American Guild of Musical Artists
AbbreviationAGMA
Formation1936; 87 years ago (1936)
TypeTrade union
HeadquartersNew York City, New York, US
Location
  • United States
Membership
6,000
President
Ray Menard
Executive director
Sam Wheeler
AffiliationsAFL–CIO
Websitemusicalartists.org Edit this at Wikidata

The American Guild of Musical Artists (AGMA) is the labor union of singers, dancers, and staging staff in opera, ballet and concert dance, and concert choral performance in the United States. A national union with a membership of over 6,000 artists,[1] AGMA provides forceful advocacy and defense of its members' employment and artistic rights. AGMA negotiates and enforces over 65 collective bargaining agreements throughout the country, ensuring fair and safe working conditions and enhancing the quality of life of its members.[2] AGMA has a direct charter[3] from the AFL–CIO and is affiliated with the AFL–CIO Branch of Associated Actors and Artists of America and the Department for Professional Employees (DPE).[4] AGMA is also a part of the Coalition of Broadway Unions and Guilds (COBUG).[2]

Jurisdiction[edit]

The American Guild of Musical Artists (AGMA) negotiates and enforces over 65 collective bargaining agreements throughout the country, ensuring fair and safe working conditions and enhancing the quality of life of its members.[5] AGMA claims exclusive jurisdiction over all aspects of the work of its members and shares some Broadway jurisdiction with its fellow union, Actors' Equity Association.

History[edit]

AGMA was founded in 1936 in an effort to protect opera singers who were being forced into unfair contracts without benefits or protections. Over the years, the union expanded its jurisdiction to include dancers, choristers, and staging staff.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "About AGMA". American Guild of Musical Artists. Retrieved September 15, 2022.
  2. ^ a b "About AGMA". American Guild of Musical Artists. Retrieved May 19, 2022.
  3. ^ "AGMA Receives AFL–CIO Charter". American Guild of Musical Artists. March 10, 2021. Retrieved May 19, 2022.
  4. ^ "Affiliated Unions". Department for Professional Employees, AFL–CIO. Retrieved May 19, 2022.
  5. ^ "Signatories". American Guild of Musical Artists. Retrieved May 19, 2022.
  6. ^ "History". American Guild of Musical Artists. Retrieved May 19, 2022.

External links[edit]