American Home Missionary Society

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The American Home Missionary Society (AHMS or A. H. M. Society) was a Protestant missionary society in the United States founded in 1826.[1] It was founded as a merger of the United Domestic Missionary Society with state missionary societies from New England.[2] The society was formed by members of the Presbyterian, Congregational, Associate Reformed, and Dutch Reformed churches with the objective "to assist congregations that are unable to support the gospel ministry, and to send the gospel to the destitute within the United States."[3] In 1893, the Society became exclusively associated with the National Council of Congregational Churches and was renamed the Congregational Home Missionary Society.[4]

Structure[edit]

The structure (as described in 1858) consisted of a President, Treasurer, Recording Secretary, an Auditor, and three corresponding Secretaries.[5]

Associated people[edit]

Associated churches[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ The Home Missionary (The Home Missionary, Volumes 23-24 (June 1850) ed.). 150 Nassau St. New York: Executive Committee of the American Home Missionary Society. 1851. pp. 25–32. Retrieved 8 September 2016. the American Home Missionary Society held its Twenty Fourth Anniversary in the Broadway Tabernacle, New York on Wednesday evening, May 8th, 1850" + table on page 31 goes back to 1826 + page 32 says "at the organization of this Society in 1826
  2. ^ The Home Missionary (The Home Missionary, Volumes 23-24 (June 1850) ed.). 150 Nassau St. New York: Executive Committee of the American Home Missionary Society. 1851. pp. 25–32. Retrieved 8 September 2016. "the missionaries of the United Domestic Missionary Society, whose responsibilities were transferred to it" ... "The New England State Societies, also, became integral parts of the National Society, in several successive years -- the Maine Missionary Society and the Vermont Domestic Missionary Society in the third year of its operations; the New Hampshire Missionary Society, in the fourth year; the Connecticut Missionary Society, in the fifth year; and the Massachusetts Missionary Society in the seventh year.
  3. ^ The New York State Register, for 1858. No. 333 Broadway, New York City: John Disturnell. 1858. p. 179. Retrieved 9 September 2016. N/A
  4. ^ Horvath.
  5. ^ The New York State Register, for 1858. No. 333 Broadway, New York City: John Disturnell. 1858. p. 179. Retrieved 9 September 2016. N/A
  6. ^ Edward Harold Mott Between the Ocean and the Lakes: The Story of Erie. Collins, 1899. p. 460-61
  7. ^ The Home Missionary (The Home Missionary, Volumes 23-24 (June 1850) ed.). 150 Nassau St. New York: Executive Committee of the American Home Missionary Society. 1851. p. 45. Retrieved 8 September 2016. The society now has *two missionaries* in Oregon the arrival of one, Rev. *George H. Atkinson,* and his settlement at Oregon City, were announced in the last Report. In November, the Rev. *Horace Lyman* and *Mrs. Lyman* arrived and were subsequently stationed at Portland.
  8. ^ Clark, J.B. (2006) Leavening the Nation: The Story of American Home Missions. Kessinger Publishing. p 117.
  9. ^ Punchard, G. (1865) "Congregationalism in Nebraska," History of Congregationalism from about A.D. 250 to the Present Time. Hurd and Houghton. p 360.
  10. ^ The New York State Register, for 1858. No. 333 Broadway, New York City: John Disturnell. 1858. p. 179. Retrieved 9 September 2016. "Milton Badger" (1858)
  11. ^ SEIGEL, PEGGY. "A Passionate Missionary to the West (Charles Beecher in Fort Wayne, Indiana, 1844-1850)". Indiana Magazine of History, Volume 106, Issue 4, pp 325-355. Indiana University. Retrieved 11 October 2016. The new pastor's early months in Fort Wayne tested his physical and emotional fortitude. In his first quarterly report to the AHMS home office in September 1844, Charles candidly reported the difficulties he faced.
  12. ^ The New York State Register, for 1858. No. 333 Broadway, New York City: John Disturnell. 1858. p. 179. Retrieved 9 September 2016. N/A
  13. ^ The New York State Register, for 1858. No. 333 Broadway, New York City: John Disturnell. 1858. p. 179. Retrieved 9 September 2016. N/A
  14. ^ Peters, Absalom (June 1, 1829). "Third Anniversary". The Home Missionary. New York, NY: Alexander Ming, Jr. p. 22.
  15. ^ Money, Jana; Osborne, Julie; Eqleston, Elizabeth (November 1994). "National Register of Historic Places Registration Form: First Methodist Episcopal Church, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, UT". National Park Service. The Congregational church was the first non-Mormon denomination introduced to Utah with the establishment of the First Congregational Church in Salt Lake City in February, 1865.
  16. ^ "Utah's First Congregational Church marks 141st year". Deseret News. Salt Lake City. January 21, 2006. – via HighBeam Research (subscription required)
  17. ^ Otis 1900, p. 4-31.
  18. ^ Otis 1900, pp. 141-142.

Bibliography[edit]