American Journal of Epidemiology

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American Journal of Epidemiology  
Abbreviated title (ISO 4)
Am J Epidemiol
Discipline Public health, Medicine
Language English language
Edited by Moyses Szklo
Publication details
Publisher
Frequency Semi-monthly
5.230
Indexing
ISSN 0002-9262 (print)
1476-6256 (web)
Links

The American Journal of Epidemiology (AJE) is a peer-reviewed journal for empirical research findings, opinion pieces, and methodological developments in the field of epidemiological research. The current Editor-in-Chief is Dr. Moyses Szklo.

Articles published in AJE are indexed by PubMed, Embase, and a number of other databases. AJE offers open access options for authors. It is published semi-monthly. Entire issues have been dedicated to abstracts from academic meetings (Society of Epidemiologic Research, North American Congress of Epidemiology), the history of the Epidemic Intelligence Service of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC),[1] the life of George W. Comstock,[2] and the celebration of notable anniversaries of schools of public health (University of California, Berkeley, School of Public Health;[3] Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine;[4] Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health).

AJE is currently ranked 4th in the field of epidemiology according to Google Scholar.[5] It has an impact factor of 5.230 (as of 2014) and the 5-year impact factor is 5.632 according to Journal Citation Reports.

History[edit]

This journal was founded in 1920 and originally named the American Journal of Hygiene. In 1965, the journal acquired its current name – American Journal of Epidemiology. Since its inception, the journal has been based in the Department of Epidemiology at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and is published in association with the Society of Epidemiologic Research.

Editors-in-chief: past and present[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Koplan, Jeffrey P.; Foege, William H. (2011-12-01). "Introduction: the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Epi-Aids--a fond recollection". American Journal of Epidemiology. 174 (11 Suppl): S1–3. ISSN 1476-6256. PMID 22135388. doi:10.1093/aje/kwr303. 
  2. ^ Szklo, Moyses (2008-10-01). "George W. Comstock--an appreciation". American Journal of Epidemiology. 168 (7): 667. ISSN 1476-6256. PMID 18794222. doi:10.1093/aje/kwn201. 
  3. ^ Buffler, P. A. (1995-11-01). "The university of california, berkeley, school of public health: honoring the past, shaping the future". American Journal of Epidemiology. 142 (9 Suppl): S1–2. ISSN 0002-9262. PMID 20880964. doi:10.1093/aje/142.Supplement_9.S1. 
  4. ^ Buekens, Pierre (2012-10-01). "Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine 100th anniversary. Introduction. From hygiene and tropical medicine to global health". American Journal of Epidemiology. 176 Suppl 7: S1–3. ISSN 1476-6256. PMID 23035133. doi:10.1093/aje/kws253. 
  5. ^ "Google Scholar Metrics". scholar.google.com. Retrieved 2015-09-10.