American Landrace pig

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American Landrace
Conservation status Least Concern
Country of origin Denmark
Traits
Notes
Derives from Danish Landrace
  • Pig
  • Sus scrofa domesticus

The American Landrace is a medium to large breed of domestic pig, white in colour, with long bodies, fine hair, long snouts, and heavy, drooping ears. They are bred for pork production.

The American Landrace derives from the Danish Landrace of 1895 Danish origin. In the early 1930s, the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) entered into an agreement with the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in Denmark for the purchase of 24 Danish Landrace to be used for swine research studies, with the stipulation that they would not be commercially propagated as a pure breed. Landrace were subsequently used in numerous comparisons with American breeds. In 1949, upon USDA petition, Denmark released the United States from its breeding restrictions. The American Landrace Association was formed in 1950, and the American Landrace breed was established from outcrosses with Norwegian and Swedish breeding stock, the Swedish Landrace and the Norwegian Landrace, with a small infusion of Poland China blood, a breed of pig originating in Ohio.[1]

Characteristics[edit]

The American Landrace is a long, lean, white pig with 16 or 17 ribs. The head is long and narrow and the ears large and heavy and hang forwards close to the snout. The back is only slightly arched or is nearly flat. The side is even and well-fleshed and the ham is plump but not over-fat. The sows produce plenty of milk, the lactation peaking at five weeks, which is rather later than is the case in most breeds. They are prolific with good mothering abilities.[1]

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