American Manufacturing Council

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Manufacturing Jobs Initiative
Predecessor President's Council on Jobs and Competitiveness[1]
Formation January 27, 2017 (2017-01-27)
Founded at Washington, D.C.
Extinction August 16, 2017 (2017-08-16) (201 days)
Parent organization
Department of Commerce[2]

The American Manufacturing Council was a group of prominent chief executives set up to advise U.S. President Donald Trump on domestic manufacturing initiatives. It was chaired by Andrew Liveris, CEO of Dow Chemical Company.[3]

Following the withdrawal of several members, Trump on August 16, 2017 disbanded the Council, as well as the Strategic and Policy Forum.[4] The council itself had earlier informed the president that they intended to disband on their own initiative.[5]

Members[edit]

  Resigned   Members until disbandment

Former Members[6] of the American Manufacturing Council
Name Title Entity Membership Status
William M. Brown CEO Harris Corporation member until disbandment
Michael Dell CEO Dell Technologies Inc member until disbandment
John J. Ferriola CEO Nucor member until disbandment
Jeff Fettig CEO Whirlpool Corporation member until disbandment
Mark Fields CEO (former) Ford Motor Company resigned in May after leaving Ford[7]
Kenneth Frazier CEO Merck & Co. resigned August 14 after Trump statements regarding events in Charlotteville[8]
Alex Gorsky CEO Johnson & Johnson resigned August 16 after Trump statements regarding events in Charlotteville[9][10][11]
Gregory J. Hayes CEO United Technologies resigned August 16 after Trump statements regarding events in Charlotteville[12]
Marillyn Hewson CEO Lockheed Martin member until disbandment
Jeff Immelt Chairman General Electric resigned August 16 after Trump statements regarding events in Charlotteville[12]
Jim Kamsickas CEO Dana Inc member until disbandment
Klaus Kleinfeld CEO (former) Arconic resigned in April after leaving Arconic[7]
Brian Krzanich CEO Intel resigned August 14 after Trump statements regarding events in Charlotteville[13]
Richard G. Kyle CEO Timken Company member until disbandment
Thea Lee Deputy Chief of Staff AFL–CIO resigned August 15 after Trump statements regarding events in Charlotteville[14]
Andrew Liveris CEO Dow Chemical Company member until disbandment
Mario Longhi CEO (former) U.S. Steel resigned in June after retiring from U.S. Steel[7]
Denise Morrison CEO Campbell Soup Company resigned August 16 after Trump statements regarding events in Charlotteville[15]
Dennis Muilenburg CEO Boeing member until disbandment
Elon Musk CEO Tesla resigned in June over U.S. withdrawal from Paris climate accord[8]
Doug Oberhelman Executive Chairman Caterpillar Inc. member until disbandment
Scott Paul President Alliance for American Manufacturing resigned August 15 after Trump statements regarding events in Charlotteville[8]
Kevin Plank CEO Under Armour resigned August 14 after Trump statements regarding events in Charlotteville[8]
Michael B. Polk CEO Newell Brands member until disbandment
Mark Sutton CEO International Paper member until disbandment
Inge Thulin CEO 3M resigned August 16 after Trump statements regarding events in Charlotteville[16][17]
Richard Trumka President AFL–CIO resigned August 15 after Trump statements regarding events in Charlotteville[14]
Wendell Weeks CEO Corning Inc. member until disbandment

Resignations and disbandment[edit]

Paris Agreement[edit]

In June 2017, Elon Musk announced his resignation from the council. He stated departure from the council was a direct response to the United States' withdrawal from the Paris Agreement.[18]

Unite the Right Rally In Charlottesville, Virginia[edit]

Seven executives resigned from the council in response to Trump's response to the violence at the Unite the Right rally in Charlottesville, Virginia on August 12, 2017.[19] The first executives to resign were drugmaker Merck & Co. CEO Kenneth Frazier, Under Armour CEO Kevin Plank, and Intel CEO Brian Krzanich.[20] On August 15, 2017, Scott Paul, president of the Alliance for American Manufacturing, also resigned.[21] The same day, Richard Trumka and Thea Lee resigned, stating that "We cannot sit on a council for a President who tolerates bigotry and domestic terrorism."[22]

Disbandment[edit]

Following the withdrawal of the members, Stephen A. Schwarzman and the remaining members decided to disband the Council during a conference call on August 16, 2017. Schwarzman called Trump the same day to announce that they had decided to disband the Council.[4] Trump tweeted shortly after that saying that he and the group had agreed to disband the Council, as well as the Strategic and Policy Forum.[4][5][23]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Meyersohn, Nathaniel (Jan 27, 2017). "Trump launches manufacturing initiative with business leaders". CNN Money. Retrieved 15 August 2017. 
  2. ^ Hanna, Andrew (Dec 9, 2016). "Trump names Dow Chemical CEO to advisory council". Politico. Retrieved 15 August 2017. 
  3. ^ Meyersohn, Nathaniel (2017-01-27). "Trump launches manufacturing initiative with business leaders". CNNMoney. Retrieved 2017-08-16. 
  4. ^ a b c Gelles, David; Thomas, Landon, Jr.; Kelly, Kate (August 16, 2017). "Trump Ends C.E.O. Advisory Councils as Main Group Acts to Disband". The New York Times. Retrieved August 16, 2017. 
  5. ^ a b Mittelman, Melissa; Kaplan, Jennifer; Cao, Jing; Colby, Laura (August 17, 2017). "The 48 Frantic Hours Before CEOs Broke With Trump". Bloomberg. Retrieved August 17, 2017. 
  6. ^ Blitchok, Dustin (27 January 2017). "All The CEOs On Trump's Manufacturing Council". benzinga.com. Retrieved 15 August 2017. 
  7. ^ a b c Bryan, Bob; Ramsey, Lydia (August 15, 2017). "5 members of Trump's manufacturing council left after Charlottesville – here's who's still on it". Business Insider. Retrieved August 15, 2017. 
  8. ^ a b c d Pandey, Erica (15 August 2017). "More CEOs leave Trump's special councils". Axios. Retrieved August 15, 2017. 
  9. ^ Muscavage, Nick (August 16, 2017). "J&J head resigns from Trump council before disbanding". my Central Jersey. Retrieved August 16, 2017. 
  10. ^ Erman, Michael (15 August 2017). "J&J says leaving White House manufacturing council". Reuters. Retrieved August 15, 2017. 
  11. ^ "Responding to Divisions Without Divisiveness" (Press release). Johnson & Johnson. 16 Aug 2017. Retrieved 17 August 2017. 
  12. ^ a b "What happened behind the scenes as Trump's business councils fell apart". CNN. 16 August 2017. Retrieved 16 August 2017. 
  13. ^ "Intel CEO is third to exit Trump's manufacturing council after Charlottesville". Fox News. August 15, 2017. Retrieved 15 August 2017. 
  14. ^ a b "AFL-CIO Representatives Resign from Presidential Council on Manufacturing". Statement. AFL-CIO. 15 August 2017. Retrieved 16 August 2017. 
  15. ^ LaVito, Angelica (2017-08-16). "Campbell CEO resigns from Trump's manufacturing council, moments after strategic and policy forum disbands". CNBC. Retrieved 2017-08-16. 
  16. ^ Sheetz, Michael (16 August 2017). "3M CEO resigns from Trump's panel". 
  17. ^ Diamond, Dan (August 16, 2017). "3M CEO becomes seventh member to quit Trump council". Politico. 
  18. ^ "Elon Musk bails on Trump's advisory councils after US withdraws from Paris climate deal". Business Insider. Retrieved 2017-08-16. 
  19. ^ "7 members of Trump's manufacturing council left after Charlottesville before Trump disbanded it". Business Insider. Retrieved 2017-08-16. 
  20. ^ "Trump yields to pressure, calls neo-Nazis and KKK criminals". 15 August 2017. Retrieved 15 August 2017 – via Reuters. 
  21. ^ Rebeca Shabad (15 August 2017). "Another top executive resigns from Trump's manufacturing council". CBS News. Retrieved 16 August 2017. 
  22. ^ Jacob Pramuk (15 August 2017). "AFL-CIO President Trumka steps down from Trump manufacturing council". CNBC. Retrieved 15 August 2017. 
  23. ^ Barbaro, Michael (August 17, 2017). "August 17, 2017". The Daily. The New York Times.