American Ninja 3: Blood Hunt

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
American Ninja 3: Blood Hunt
American Ninja 3 Blood Hunt.jpg
Promotional poster
Directed by Cedric Sundstrom
Produced by Harry Alan Towers
John Stodel
Avi Lerner
Written by Gary Conway (screenplay)
Gideon Amir and Avi Kleinberger (characters)
Starring
Music by George S. Clinton
Cinematography George Bartels
Edited by Michael J. Duthie
Distributed by Cannon Films
Release date
  • February 24, 1989 (1989-02-24)
Running time
89 minutes
Country United States
Language English
Box office $902,152 (USA)
$654,454 (West Germany)

American Ninja 3: Blood Hunt is a 1989 martial arts action movie starring David Bradley, written by Gary Conway and directed by Cedric Sundstrom.

Plot[edit]

A powerful terrorist known as "The Cobra" (Marjoe Gortner), has infected Sean Davidson, the American ninja, with a deadly virus as human guinea pigs in his biological warfare experiments. Sean and his partners Curtis Jackson (Steve James) and Dexter (Evan J. Klisser) have no choice but to fight The Cobra and his army of genetically-engineered ninja clones led by the female ninja Chan Lee (Michele B. Chan).

Production[edit]

The film, shot in South Africa (not mentioned on the credits), was the first in the American Ninja series to feature a lead actor other than Michael Dudikoff (playing Joe Armstrong in the first two American Ninja movies as well as in American Ninja 4: The Annihilation together with David Bradley's character Sean Davidson); Bradley was cast after Kurt McKinney turned down the offer.

Home releases[edit]

The film was released on the VHS by Cannon Home Video in 1990 and on the DVD in a double feature pack along with American Ninja 2: The Confrontation in 2002 by MGM.

Reception[edit]

It was received poorly by critics.[1] As of March 2014, the film is rated only 3.2/10 at the Internet Movie Database, with just over 3,000 cast votes.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Willman, Chris (1989-02-28). "'Ninja 3': Bland Leading the Bland". The Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 2010-09-04. 

External links[edit]