American Nurses Association Hall of Fame

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Mary Eliza Mahoney, first African American professionally trained nurse in the United States
Margaret Sanger, birth control advocate

The American Nurses Association Hall of Fame or the ANA Hall of Fame is an award which recognizes the historical contributions to nursing in the United States.

History[edit]

In 1974, in preparation for the United States Bicentennial, the American Nurses Association (ANA) created a seven-member committee to recognize the dedication and achievements of professional nurses in a Hall of Fame. Fifteen inaugural women were selected as inductees and the committee recommended that the nomination process and inductions become a permanent vehicle for recognition.[1] In 1982, National Nurse's Day was proclaimed by President Ronald Reagan to be celebrated on May 6[2] and in conjunction with the celebration, the ANA at their annual convention, inducted six more nurses.[3] The ANA board approved periodic addition of members thereafter, inducting new members in 1984, 1986, and 1996. In 1996, the criteria changed so that inductees did not have to be deceased and that inductions occur biennially.[1]

Criteria[edit]

The criteria for induction include that the nominees must be leaders in health, social or political policy which have had a sustaining impact on nursing in the United States. All candidates, unless they were working prior to 1873, must have completed a formal registered nursing program. Contributions to the field could have occurred locally or internationally, but must demonstrate their enduring value beyond the honoree's lifetime. Since 1996, inductees may be living or deceased.[4]

Inductees[edit]

ANA Hall of Fame
Name Image Birth–Death Year Area of achievement
Dorothea Lynde Dix Dix-Dorothea-LOC.jpg (1802-1887) 1976 mental health advocate and Civil War Superintendent of Army Nurses[5]
Lavinia Lloyd Dock Lavinia Lloyd Dock.jpg (1858-1956) 1976 textbook writer and author of standard nurse's manual of drugs[6]
Martha Minerva Franklin (1870-1968) 1976 African American nurse organizer and founder of the National Association of Colored Graduate Nurses[7]
Annie Warburton Goodrich (1866-1954) 1976 dean of the Army School of Nursing and later dean of the first nursing program at Yale University[8]
Stella Goostray (1886-1969) 1976 nursing scholar, author, and educator[9]
Clara Louise Maass Clara Maass.jpg (1876-1901) 1976 volunteer in medical experiments for yellow fever[10]
Mary Eliza Mahoney Mary Eliza Mahoney.jpg (1845-1926) 1976 first African American professional nurse in the U.S.[11]
Mary Adelaide Nutting (1858-1948) 1976 the first nurse appointed as a university professor[12]
Sophia French Palmer (1853-1920) 1976 co-founder and first editor of the American Journal of Nursing[13]
Linda Anne Judson Richards Linda Richards 001.jpg (1841-1930) 1976 first trained nurse in the U.S.[14]
Isabel Adams Hampton Robb Isabel Hampton Portrait.jpg (1860-1910) 1976 first president of the American Nurses Association[15]
Margaret H. Sanger MargaretSanger-Underwood.LOC.jpg (1879-1966) 1976 opened the first birth control clinic in the United States[16]
Isabel Maitland Stewart (1878-1963) 1976 leader in the development of nursing curriculum[17]
Adah Belle Samuel Thoms (1870-1943) 1976 director of the Lincoln School for Nurses and president of the National Association of Colored Graduate Nurses for seven years[18]
Lillian D. Wald Portrait of Lillian Wald.jpg (1867-1940) 1976 director of the Lincoln School for Nurses and president of the National Association of Colored Graduate Nurses for seven years[19]
Mary Breckinridge (1881–1965) 1982 founder of the Frontier Nursing Service[20]
Mary E.P. Davis (1840-1924) 1982 co-founder/manager of The American Journal of Nursing[21]
Jane Arminda Delano Jane Delano Memorial.jpg (1862-1919) 1982 founder of the American Red Cross Nursing Service[22]
Mary May Roberts (1877-1959) 1982 editor for 28 years of The American Journal of Nursing[23]
Julia Catherine Stimson Julia Catherine Stimson 1920.jpg (1881-1948) 1982 superintendent of the Army Nurse Corps[24]
Shirley Carew Titus (1892-1967) 1982 nursing labor organizer[25]
Helen Lathrop Bunge (1906-1970) 1984 executive officer of the Institute of Research and Services at Teachers College Nursing Education division[26]
Margaret Baggett Dolan (1914-1974) 1984 19th president of the American Nurses Association[27]
Katharine Densford Dreves (1890-1978) 1984 president of the American Nurses Association, vice-president of the International Council of Nurses[28]
Ruth Benson Freeman (1906-1982) 1984 public health nurse educator[29]
Alma Elizabeth Gault (1891-1981) 1984 dean of the African American Meharry Medical College School of Nursing[30]
Janet M. Geister (1885-1964) 1984 researcher, conducted governmental studies of children's day care centers[31]
Lydia Eloise Hall (1906-1969) 1984 long-term and chronic disease control theorist[32]
Estelle Massey Osborne (1901-1981) 1984 first black nurse to earn a master's degree in the U.S.[33]
Frances Reiter (1904-1977) 1984 first dean of the Graduate School of Nursing at New York Medical College[34]
Emilie Gleason Sargent (1894-1977) 1984 executive director of the Detroit Visiting Nursing Association for 40 years[35]
Anne Hervey Strong (1876-1925) 1984 director of the Simmons College School of Public Health Nursing[36]
Julia Charlotte Thompson (1907-1972) 1984 director of the American Nurses Association and its first full-time lobbyist[37]
Ellwynne Mae Vreeland (1909-1971) 1984 developed the first nationwide extramural federal nursing research program[38]
Mary Berenice Beck (1890-1960) 1986 earned the first nursing education doctorate of the Catholic University of America[39]
Adda Eldredge (1865-1955) 1986 instrumental in securing passage of an Illinois nursing practice act and became license holder #1[40]
Mary Sewall Gardner (1871-1961) 1986 author of the first text on Public Health Nursing in the U.S.[41]
Elizabeth Sterling Soule (1884-1972) 1986 established the Department of Nursing at the University of Washington[42]
Effie J. Taylor Effie Jane Taylor.jpg (1874-1970) 1986 pioneer in psychiatric and mental health nursing[43]
Florence Guinness Blake (1907-1983) 1996 advanced education in pediatric nursing[44]
Florence Aby Blanchfield Florence A. Blanchfield.jpg (1882-1971) 1996 first woman to receive a military commission in the regular army of the U.S.[45]
Dorothy Cornelius (1918-1992) 1996 only nurse to serve as president of the American Nurses Association, the American Journal of Nursing Company and for the International Council of Nurses[46]
Virginia A. Henderson (1897-1996) 1996 theorist and researcher—authored one of the most definitive descriptions of nursing[47]
Katherine J. Hoffman (1910-1984) 1996 first nurse to earn a doctorate in the state of Washington[48]
Anna Caroline Maxwell (1851-1929) 1996 trained nurses for the Spanish–American War and spurred the establishment of the Army Nurse Corps[49]
Lucille Elizabeth Notter (1907-1993) 1996 co-creator and first full-time editor of Nursing Research[50]
Agnes K. Ohlson (1902-1991) 1996 spearheaded standardization of nurse licensing requirements throughout the U.S.[51]
Mary D. Osborne (1875-1946) 1996 pioneering maternity nurse[52]
Sara Elizabeth Parsons (1864-1949) 1996 founded nurse training schools to advance psychiatric nursing[53]
Elizabeth Kerr Porter (1894-1989) 1996 nurse educator and nursing rights advocate[54]
Martha Elizabeth Rogers (1914-1994) 1996 developed the theory of the Science of Unitary Human Beings[55]
Mabel Keaton Staupers (1890-1989) 1996 advocate for racial equality in the nursing profession[56]
Florence S. Wald (1917-2008) 1996 founder of the first hospice program in the U.S.[57]
Mary Opal Wolanin (1910-) 1996 expert in eldercare who advocated for inclusion of gerontological information in nursing curricula[58]
Annie Damer (1858-1915) 1998 president of the first Board of Nursing Examiners[59]
Clara Dutton Noyes (1869-1936) 1998 World War I director of the Red Cross' Bureau of Nursing[60]
Hildegard Peplau (1909-1999) 1998 pioneer advocate for patient-nurse relationships and psychiatric nursing[61]
Dorothy Reilly (1920-1996) 1998 scholar and educator, who focused on the development of nursing education[62]
Dorothy M. Smith (1913-1997) 1998 founding dean of the University of Florida College of Nursing[63]
Mary Elizabeth Carnegie (1916-2008) 2000 author, educator and advocate for removal of racial barriers in the nursing profession[64]
Signe Skott Cooper (1921-) 2000 Developed the concept of continuing nursing education[65]
Maggie Jacobs (1943-1992) 2000[66] instrumental in the development of the New York City municipal health care system and advocate for health services for the poor[67]
Undine Sams (1919-1999) 2000 implemented integration of the Florida Nurses Association[68]
Margretta Madden Styles (1930-2005) 2000 architect of the 1970s comprehensive study of nursing credentialing, which established national standards of nursing practices[69]
Sadie Heath Cabaniss (1863-1921) 2002 developed the first nurses' training school in Virginia[70]
Harriet Patience Dame Harriet Patience Dame painting.jpg (1815-1900) 2002 her service during the Civil War inspired Congress provide pensions to battlefield and hospital nurses of the conflict[71]
Veronica Margaret Driscoll (1926-1994) 2002 collective bargaining and labor organizer for New York nurses[72]
Mary Lewis Wyche (1858-1936) 2002 advocate of regulation of nursing practice and standards in North Carolina[73]
Susie Walking Bear Yellowtail (1903-1981) 2002 instrumental in modernizing the Indian Health Service and eliminate abuses in care provided to Native Americans[74]
Luther Christman (1915-2011) 2004 first man to hold the position of dean at a nursing school[75]
Imogene King (1923-2007) 2004 pioneering nurse theorist[76]
Hattie M. Bessent (?-2015) 2008 first African American nurse to receive a PhD at Florida A&M University and first tenured African American nurse at the University of Florida[77]
Nettie Birnbach (?) 2010 president of the New York State Nurses Association[78]
Claire M. Fagin (1926-) 2010 first woman to serve as a university president with an Ivy League university, when she was named interim president of the University of Pennsylvania[79]
John F. Garde (1935-2009)[80] 2010 pioneering nurse anesthetist[81]
Ada K. Jacox (?) 2010 researcher and educator specializing in pain management[82]
John Devereaux Thompson (1917-1992) 2010 influenced policy on Medicare reimbursement procedures and a pioneer in functional hospital architecture and design[83]
Faye Glenn Abdellah (1919-) 2012 first woman to serve as U.S. Deputy Surgeon General[84]
Josephine A. Dolan (1913-2004) 2012 nursing historian and first faculty member at the University Of Connecticut School Of Nursing[85]
Eleanor C. Lambertsen (1916-1998)[86] 2012 pioneered the concept of interdisciplinary team nursing to improve patient care[87]
Mary Lee Mills (1912-2010)[88] 2012 chief nursing officer of the U.S. Public Health Service and consultant on national health systems to the Secretary of the U.S. Department of Health, Education and Welfare[89]
Margaret D. Sovie (1933-2002)[90] 2012 educator and researcher who helped establish criteria for nurse recognition programs[91]
Russell E. Tranbarger (?) 2012 administrator, educator and advocate for male nursing[92]
Barbara Thoman Curtis (1938-2015) 2014 organized the first political action committee for the ANA[93]
Pearl McIver (1893-1976) 2014 chief nurse of the U. S. Public Health Service[94]
Mary Ellen Patton (?) 2014 nursing labor advocate for improving labor conditions of health service workers[95]
Robert V. Piemonte (1934-)[96] 2014 first male nursing PhD recipient to head the National Student Nurses' Association[97]
Jessie M. Scott (1915-2009) 2014 pushed for passage and helped implement the Nurse Training Act[98]
Muriel Poulin (?) 2016 after serving in numerous international posts, established the first nursing master's degree program in Spain[99]
Patricia Messmer (?) 2016 chair of the Nurses Charitable Trust[99]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "ANA Hall of Fame". Silver Spring, Maryland: Nursing World. 2016. Archived from the original on September 28, 2015. Retrieved 7 July 2016.
  2. ^ Turchi, Megan (May 1, 2015). "How a long struggle for recognition led to National Nurses Day". Boston, Massachusetts: Boston.com. Archived from the original on May 2, 2016. Retrieved 7 July 2016.
  3. ^ Summary of proceedings. Silver Spring, Maryland: American Nurses' Association. 1983. pp. 8–9.
  4. ^ "ANA Hall of Fame-Details". Silver Spring, Maryland: American Nurses Association. 2016. Retrieved 7 July 2016.
  5. ^ "Dorothea Lynde Dix (1802-1887) 1976 Inductee". Silver Spring, Maryland: American Nurses Association. 2016. Retrieved 7 July 2016.[permanent dead link]
  6. ^ "Lavinia Lloyd Dock (1858-1956) 1976 Inductee". Silver Spring, Maryland: American Nurses Association. 2016. Archived from the original on 2017-05-10. Retrieved 7 July 2016.
  7. ^ "Martha Minerva Franklin (1870-1968) 1976 Inductee". Silver Spring, Maryland: American Nurses Association. 2016. Archived from the original on 2017-05-16. Retrieved 7 July 2016.
  8. ^ "Annie Warburton Goodrich (1866-1954) 1976 Inductee". Silver Spring, Maryland: American Nurses Association. 2016. Retrieved 7 July 2016.[permanent dead link]
  9. ^ "Stella Goostray (1886-1969) 1976 Inductee". Silver Spring, Maryland: American Nurses Association. 2016. Archived from the original on 2017-05-12. Retrieved 7 July 2016.
  10. ^ "Clara Louise Maass (1876-1901) 1976 Inductee". Silver Spring, Maryland: American Nurses Association. 2016. Archived from the original on 2017-05-11. Retrieved 7 July 2016.
  11. ^ "Mary Eliza Mahoney (1845-1926) 1976 Inductee". Silver Spring, Maryland: American Nurses Association. 2016. Archived from the original on 2017-05-16. Retrieved 7 July 2016.
  12. ^ "Mary Adelaide Nutting (1858-1948) 1976 Inductee". Silver Spring, Maryland: American Nurses Association. 2016. Archived from the original on 2017-05-11. Retrieved 7 July 2016.
  13. ^ "Sophia French Palmer (1853-1920) 1976 Inductee". Silver Spring, Maryland: American Nurses Association. 2016. Archived from the original on 2017-05-11. Retrieved 7 July 2016.
  14. ^ "Linda Anne Judson Richards (1841-1930) 1976 Inductee". Silver Spring, Maryland: American Nurses Association. 2016. Archived from the original on 2016-10-03. Retrieved 7 July 2016.
  15. ^ "Isabel Adams Hampton Robb (1860-1910) 1976 Inductee". Silver Spring, Maryland: American Nurses Association. 2016. Archived from the original on 2017-05-12. Retrieved 7 July 2016.
  16. ^ "Margaret H. Sanger (1879-1966) 1976 Inductee". Silver Spring, Maryland: American Nurses Association. 2016. Archived from the original on 2017-05-11. Retrieved 7 July 2016.
  17. ^ "Isabel Maitland Stewart (1878-1963) 1976 Inductee". Silver Spring, Maryland: American Nurses Association. 2016. Retrieved 7 July 2016.[permanent dead link]
  18. ^ "Adah Belle Samuel Thoms (1870-1943) 1976 Inductee". Silver Spring, Maryland: American Nurses Association. 2016. Archived from the original on 2017-05-16. Retrieved 7 July 2016.
  19. ^ "Lillian D. Wald (1867-1940) 1976 Inductee". Silver Spring, Maryland: American Nurses Association. 2016. Archived from the original on 2017-05-16. Retrieved 7 July 2016.
  20. ^ "Mary Breckinridge (1881-1965) 1982 Inductee". Silver Spring, Maryland: American Nurses Association. 2016. Archived from the original on 2017-05-16. Retrieved 7 July 2016.
  21. ^ "Mary E.P. Davis (1840-1924) 1982 Inductee". Silver Spring, Maryland: American Nurses Association. 2016. Retrieved 7 July 2016.
  22. ^ "Jane Arminda Delano (1862-1919) 1982 Inductee". Silver Spring, Maryland: American Nurses Association. 2016. Archived from the original on 2017-05-11. Retrieved 7 July 2016.
  23. ^ "Mrs. Breckinridge Enters the ANA Hall of Fame" (PDF). Frontier Nursing Service Quarterly Bulletin. Hyden, Kentucky: Frontier Nursing University. 58 (1): 26. Summer 1982. ISSN 0016-2116. Retrieved 7 July 2016.
  24. ^ "Julia Catherine Stimson (1881-1948) 1982 Inductee". Silver Spring, Maryland: American Nurses Association. 2016. Archived from the original on 2017-05-10. Retrieved 7 July 2016.
  25. ^ "Shirley Carew Titus (1892-1967) 1982 Inductee". Silver Spring, Maryland: American Nurses Association. 2016. Archived from the original on 2016-10-03. Retrieved 7 July 2016.
  26. ^ "Helen Lathrop Bunge (1906-1970) 1984 Inductee". Silver Spring, Maryland: American Nurses Association. 2016. Retrieved 7 July 2016.[permanent dead link]
  27. ^ "Margaret Baggett Dolan (1914-1974) 1984 Inductee". Silver Spring, Maryland: American Nurses Association. 2016. Archived from the original on 2017-05-11. Retrieved 7 July 2016.
  28. ^ "Katharine Densford Dreves (1890-1978) 1984 Inductee". Silver Spring, Maryland: American Nurses Association. 2016. Archived from the original on 2017-05-16. Retrieved 7 July 2016.
  29. ^ "Ruth Benson Freeman (1906-1982) 1984 Inductee". Silver Spring, Maryland: American Nurses Association. 2016. Archived from the original on 2017-05-12. Retrieved 7 July 2016.
  30. ^ "Alma Elizabeth Gault (1891-1981) 1984 Inductee". Silver Spring, Maryland: American Nurses Association. 2016. Archived from the original on 2017-05-12. Retrieved 7 July 2016.
  31. ^ "Janet M. Geister (1885-1964) 1984 Inductee". Silver Spring, Maryland: American Nurses Association. 2016. Archived from the original on 2017-05-12. Retrieved 7 July 2016.
  32. ^ "Lydia Eloise Hall (1906-1969) 1984 Inductee". Silver Spring, Maryland: American Nurses Association. 2016. Retrieved 7 July 2016.[permanent dead link]
  33. ^ "Estelle Massey Osborne (1901-1981) 1984 Inductee". Silver Spring, Maryland: American Nurses Association. 2016. Archived from the original on 2017-05-12. Retrieved 7 July 2016.
  34. ^ "Frances Reiter (1904-1977) 1984 Inductee". Silver Spring, Maryland: American Nurses Association. 2016. Archived from the original on 2017-05-12. Retrieved 7 July 2016.
  35. ^ "Emilie Gleason Sargent (1894-1977) 1984 Inductee". Silver Spring, Maryland: American Nurses Association. 2016. Retrieved 7 July 2016.[permanent dead link]
  36. ^ "Anne Hervey Strong (1876-1925) 1984 Inductee". Silver Spring, Maryland: American Nurses Association. 2016. Archived from the original on 2017-05-11. Retrieved 7 July 2016.
  37. ^ "Julia Charlotte Thompson (1907-1972) 1984 Inductee". Silver Spring, Maryland: American Nurses Association. 2016. Retrieved 7 July 2016.[permanent dead link]
  38. ^ "Ellwynne Mae Vreeland (1909-1971) 1984 Inductee". Silver Spring, Maryland: American Nurses Association. 2016. Archived from the original on 2017-05-12. Retrieved 7 July 2016.
  39. ^ "Mary Berenice Beck (1890-1960) 1986 Inductee". Silver Spring, Maryland: American Nurses Association. 2016. Archived from the original on 2017-05-10. Retrieved 7 July 2016.
  40. ^ "Adda Eldredge (1865-1955) 1986 Inductee". Silver Spring, Maryland: American Nurses Association. 2016. Retrieved 7 July 2016.[permanent dead link]
  41. ^ "Mary Sewall Gardner (1871-1961) 1986 Inductee". Silver Spring, Maryland: American Nurses Association. 2016. Retrieved 7 July 2016.[permanent dead link]
  42. ^ "Elizabeth Sterling Soule (1884-1972) 1986 Inductee". Silver Spring, Maryland: American Nurses Association. 2016. Retrieved 7 July 2016.[permanent dead link]
  43. ^ "Effie J. Taylor (1874-1970) 1986 Inductee". Silver Spring, Maryland: American Nurses Association. 2016. Retrieved 7 July 2016.
  44. ^ "Florence Guinness Blake (1907-1983) 1996 Inductee". Silver Spring, Maryland: American Nurses Association. 2016. Archived from the original on 2017-05-11. Retrieved 8 July 2016.
  45. ^ "Florence Aby Blanchfield (1882-1971) 1996 Inductee". Silver Spring, Maryland: American Nurses Association. 2016. Retrieved 8 July 2016.
  46. ^ "Dorothy A. Cornelius (1918-1992) 1996 Inductee". Silver Spring, Maryland: American Nurses Association. 2016. Archived from the original on 2017-10-01. Retrieved 8 July 2016.
  47. ^ "Virginia A. Henderson (1897-1996) 1996 Inductee". Silver Spring, Maryland: American Nurses Association. 2016. Archived from the original on 2017-05-12. Retrieved 8 July 2016.
  48. ^ "Katherine J. Hoffman (1910-1984) 1996 Inductee". Silver Spring, Maryland: American Nurses Association. 2016. Retrieved 8 July 2016.[permanent dead link]
  49. ^ "Anna Caroline Maxwell (1851-1929) 1996 Inductee". Silver Spring, Maryland: American Nurses Association. 2016. Archived from the original on 2016-10-03. Retrieved 8 July 2016.
  50. ^ "Lucille Elizabeth Notter (1907-1993) 1996 Inductee". Silver Spring, Maryland: American Nurses Association. 2016. Retrieved 8 July 2016.[permanent dead link]
  51. ^ "Agnes K. Ohlson (1902-1991) 1996 Inductee". Silver Spring, Maryland: American Nurses Association. 2016. Retrieved 8 July 2016.[permanent dead link]
  52. ^ "Mary D. Osborne (1875-1946) 1996 Inductee". Silver Spring, Maryland: American Nurses Association. 2016. Retrieved 8 July 2016.[permanent dead link]
  53. ^ "Sara Elizabeth Parsons (1864-1949) 1996 Inductee". Silver Spring, Maryland: American Nurses Association. 2016. Retrieved 8 July 2016.[permanent dead link]
  54. ^ "Elizabeth Kerr Porter (1894-1989) 1996 Inductee". Silver Spring, Maryland: American Nurses Association. 2016. Archived from the original on 2017-05-11. Retrieved 8 July 2016.
  55. ^ "Martha Elizabeth Rogers (1914-1994) 1996 Inductee". Silver Spring, Maryland: American Nurses Association. 2016. Retrieved 8 July 2016.[permanent dead link]
  56. ^ "Mabel Keaton Staupers (1890-1989) 1996 Inductee". Silver Spring, Maryland: American Nurses Association. 2016. Archived from the original on 2017-05-10. Retrieved 8 July 2016.
  57. ^ "Florence S. Wald (1917-2008) 1996 Inductee". Silver Spring, Maryland: American Nurses Association. 2016. Archived from the original on 2017-05-12. Retrieved 8 July 2016.
  58. ^ "Mary Opal Wolanin (1910-) 1996 Inductee". Silver Spring, Maryland: American Nurses Association. 2016. Retrieved 8 July 2016.[permanent dead link]
  59. ^ "Annie Damer (1858-1915) 1998 Inductee". Silver Spring, Maryland: American Nurses Association. 2016. Archived from the original on 2017-05-12. Retrieved 8 July 2016.
  60. ^ "Clara Noyes (1869-1936) 1998 Inductee". Silver Spring, Maryland: American Nurses Association. 2016. Retrieved 8 July 2016.[permanent dead link]
  61. ^ "Hildegard Peplau (1909-1999) 1998 Inductee". Silver Spring, Maryland: American Nurses Association. 2016. Archived from the original on 2017-05-17. Retrieved 8 July 2016.
  62. ^ "Dorothy Reilly (1920-1996) 1998 Inductee". Silver Spring, Maryland: American Nurses Association. 2016. Archived from the original on 2017-05-10. Retrieved 8 July 2016.
  63. ^ "Dorothy M. Smith (1913-1997) 1998 Inductee". Silver Spring, Maryland: American Nurses Association. 2016. Archived from the original on 2017-05-11. Retrieved 8 July 2016.
  64. ^ "Mary Elizabeth Carnegie (1916-2008) 2000 Inductee". Silver Spring, Maryland: American Nurses Association. 2016. Archived from the original on 2017-05-12. Retrieved 8 July 2016.
  65. ^ "Signe Skott Cooper (1921-) 2000 Inductee". Silver Spring, Maryland: American Nurses Association. 2016. Retrieved 8 July 2016.
  66. ^ "Maggie Jacobs (1943-1992) 2000 Inductee". Silver Spring, Maryland: American Nurses Association. 2016. Archived from the original on 2017-05-11. Retrieved 8 July 2016.
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  68. ^ "Undine Sams (1919-1999) 2000 Inductee". Silver Spring, Maryland: American Nurses Association. 2016. Archived from the original on 2017-05-12. Retrieved 8 July 2016.
  69. ^ "Margretta Madden Styles (1930-2005) 2000 Inductee". Silver Spring, Maryland: American Nurses Association. 2016. Archived from the original on 2017-05-11. Retrieved 8 July 2016.
  70. ^ "Sadie Heath Cabaniss (1863-1921) 2002 Inductee". Silver Spring, Maryland: American Nurses Association. 2016. Retrieved 8 July 2016.[permanent dead link]
  71. ^ "Harriet Patience Dame (1815-1900) 2002 Inductee". Silver Spring, Maryland: American Nurses Association. 2016. Retrieved 8 July 2016.[permanent dead link]
  72. ^ "Veronica Margaret Driscoll (1926-1994) 2002 Inductee". Silver Spring, Maryland: American Nurses Association. 2016. Archived from the original on 2016-10-20. Retrieved 8 July 2016.
  73. ^ "Mary Lewis Wyche (1858-1936) 2002 Inductee". Silver Spring, Maryland: American Nurses Association. 2016. Retrieved 8 July 2016.[permanent dead link]
  74. ^ "Susie Walking Bear Yellowtail (1903-1981) 2002 Inductee". Silver Spring, Maryland: American Nurses Association. 2016. Archived from the original on 2016-07-31. Retrieved 8 July 2016.
  75. ^ "Luther P. Christman (1915-2011) 2004 Inductee" (PDF). Silver Spring, Maryland. 2016. Retrieved 8 July 2016.[permanent dead link]
  76. ^ "Imogene King (1923-2007) 2004 Inductee" (PDF). Silver Spring, Maryland. 2016. Retrieved 8 July 2016.[permanent dead link]
  77. ^ "Dr. Hattie M. Bessent 2008 Inductee". Silver Spring, Maryland. 2008. Archived from the original on 2016-03-31. Retrieved 8 July 2016.
  78. ^ "Nettie Birnbach 2010 Inductee" (PDF). Silver Spring, Maryland. 2010. Retrieved 8 July 2016.[permanent dead link]
  79. ^ "Claire M. Fagin 2010 Inductee" (PDF). Silver Spring, Maryland. 2010. Retrieved 8 July 2016.[permanent dead link]
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  81. ^ "John F. Garde 2010 Inductee" (PDF). Silver Spring, Maryland. 2010. Retrieved 8 July 2016.[permanent dead link]
  82. ^ "Ada K. Jacox 2010 Inductee" (PDF). Silver Spring, Maryland. 2010. Retrieved 8 July 2016.[permanent dead link]
  83. ^ "John Devereaux Thompson 2010 Inductee" (PDF). Silver Spring, Maryland. 2010. Retrieved 8 July 2016.[permanent dead link]
  84. ^ "Faye Glenn Abdellah 2012 Inductee". Silver Spring, Maryland. 2016. Archived from the original on 2017-05-17. Retrieved 8 July 2016.
  85. ^ "Josephine A. Dolan 2012 Inductee". Silver Spring, Maryland. 2016. Archived from the original on 2017-05-11. Retrieved 8 July 2016.
  86. ^ Donaldson, Rachel; Hutchinson, Gertrude B., eds. (May 22, 2012). "Eleanor Lambertsen Papers". Foundation of New York State Nurses. Guilderland, New York: Bellevue Alumnae Center for Nursing History. Archived from the original on 2016-06-24. Retrieved 8 July 2016.
  87. ^ "Eleanor C. Lambertsen 2012 Inductee". Silver Spring, Maryland. 2016. Retrieved 8 July 2016.
  88. ^ Muglia, Caroline; Khater, Micah; Pitts, Graham Auman (September 2, 2015). "Mary Mills (1912-2010): African-American Nurse in Lebanon". North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina: Moise A. Khayrallah Center for Lebanese Diaspora Studies. Archived from the original on July 8, 2016. Retrieved 8 July 2016.
  89. ^ "Mary Lee Mills 2012 Inductee". Silver Spring, Maryland. 2016. Retrieved 8 July 2016.[permanent dead link]
  90. ^ "Dr. Margaret Sovie, Nursing". The University of Pennsylvania Almanac. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: University of Pennsylvania. 49 (2). September 3, 2002. Retrieved 8 July 2016.
  91. ^ "Margaret D. Sovie 2012 Inductee". Silver Spring, Maryland. 2016. Retrieved 8 July 2016.[permanent dead link]
  92. ^ "Russell E. Tranbarger 2012 Inductee". Silver Spring, Maryland. 2016. Archived from the original on 2017-05-12. Retrieved 8 July 2016.
  93. ^ "Barbara Thoman Curtis (1938-2015) 2014 Inductee". Silver Spring, Maryland. 2016. Retrieved 8 July 2016.
  94. ^ "Pearl McIver (1893–1976) 2014 Inductee". Silver Spring, Maryland. 2016. Retrieved 8 July 2016.
  95. ^ "Mary Ellen Patton 2014 Inductee". Silver Spring, Maryland. 2016. Retrieved 8 July 2016.
  96. ^ Donaldson, Rachel; Hutchinson, Gertrude B., eds. (February 20, 2016). "Robert Piemonte Papers". Foundation of New York State Nurses. Guilderland, New York: Bellevue Alumnae Center for Nursing History. Retrieved 8 July 2016.
  97. ^ "Robert V. Piemonte 2014 Inductee". Silver Spring, Maryland. 2016. Retrieved 8 July 2016.
  98. ^ "Jessie M. Scott (1915–2009) 2014 Inductee". Silver Spring, Maryland. 2016. Retrieved 8 July 2016.
  99. ^ a b "American Nurses Association Announces National Awards Recipients". Silver Spring, Maryland. May 18, 2016. Retrieved 8 July 2016.

External links[edit]