American Osteopathic Board of Anesthesiology

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American Osteopathic Board of Anesthesiology
American Osteopathic Board of Anesthesiology logo.png
Abbreviation AOBA
Predecessor AOBS(1940-1955)
Formation 1956[1]
Type Professional
Headquarters Chicago, IL[2]
Coordinates 41°53′36″N 87°37′25″W / 41.89335°N 87.623616°W / 41.89335; -87.623616Coordinates: 41°53′36″N 87°37′25″W / 41.89335°N 87.623616°W / 41.89335; -87.623616
Chair
Allan Escher, D.O., FAOCA[3]
Vice Chair
Brett Groff, D.O.
Secretary-Treasurer
Jonathan Klein, D.O., FAOCA
Key people
Vivian Ross, MAFM, Certification Director
Website certification.osteopathic.org/anesthesiology/

The American Osteopathic Board of Anesthesiology (AOBA) is an organization that provides board certification to qualified Doctors of Osteopathic Medicine (D.O.) who specialize in the administration of anesthetic agents and perioperative medicine (anesthesiologists). The board is one 18 medical specialty certifying boards of the American Osteopathic Association Bureau of Osteopathic Specialists approved by the American Osteopathic Association (AOA),[4][5] and was established in 1956. As of December 2016, 650 osteopathic anesthesiologists held active certification with the AOBA.[6]

The AOBA is one of two certifying boards for anesthesiologists in the United States. The other certifying authority is the American Board of Anesthesiology, a member board of the American Board of Medical Specialties.

History[edit]

From June 26, 1940 until the creation of the AOBA, the American Osteopathic Board of Surgery (AOBS) certified osteopathic anesthesiologists. In 1949, a group of 36 osteopathic anesthesiologists met in Detroit, Michigan to join together and form the American Society of Osteopathic Anesthesiologists (ASOA). The original six members of the ASOA Board of Governors were each certified in anesthesiology by the AOBS. In 1950, Crawford Esterline, DO invited all osteopathic anesthesiologists to join the ASOA, the "foundation for a separate college and certifying board in the future."[7]

In 1952, the American Osteopathic College of Anesthesiologists (AOCA) received recognition by the American Osteopathic Association as a separate college; the records and assets of the ASOA were transferred to the fledgling college. During the 1955 AOCA meeting in Washington, DC on motion by B.H. Traven, DO, and unanimous vote by the members present, the Board of Governors moved to "request a separate Board of Certification in Anesthesiology."[7]

Board certification[edit]

Initial certification is available to osteopathic anesthesiologists who have successfully completed an AOA-approved residency in anesthesiology, two years of practice, and successful completion of written exams, oral exams, and clinical exams.[8]

Board certified osteopathic anesthesiologists must participate in Osteopathic Continuous Certification every ten years to avoid expiration of their board certified status.[9]

Osteopathic anesthesiologists may also receive Subspecialty Certification in Critical Care Medicine, Pain Management, and Pediatric Anesthesiology.[10][11] The Subspecialty Certification must be maintained through the process of Osteopathic Continuous Certification every 10 years.[11][12]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "About the AOBA". American Osteopathic College of Anesthesiology. 2012. Archived from the original on 10 July 2012. Retrieved 14 September 2012. 
  2. ^ "Contact Us". American Osteopathic Board of Anesthesiology. 2012. Retrieved 14 September 2012. 
  3. ^ "Board Members". American Osteopathic Board of Anesthesiology. 2017. Retrieved 8 August 2017. 
  4. ^ "American Osteopathic Board of Anesthesiology". Health Workforce Information Center. 2011. Archived from the original on 15 April 2013. Retrieved 14 September 2012. 
  5. ^ "AOA Specialty Certifying Boards". American Osteopathic Association. Retrieved 14 September 2012. 
  6. ^ Ayres, Ronald E; Scheinthal, S; Gross, C; Bell, E (April 2017). "Changes to Osteopathic Specialty Board Certification". Journal of the American Osteopathic Association. 117 (4): 268–271. Archived from the original on 4 March 2016. Retrieved 8 August 2017. 
  7. ^ a b Traven, Boris. "History of the American Osteopathic College of Anesthesiologists" (PDF). www.aocaonline.org/. American Osteopathic College of Anesthesiologists. Retrieved 9 August 2017. 
  8. ^ "Certification". American Osteopathic Board of Anesthesiology. 2012. Retrieved 14 September 2012. 
  9. ^ "Recertification". American Osteopathic Board of Anesthesiology. 2017. Retrieved 8 August 2017. 
  10. ^ "Specialties & Subspecialties". American Osteopathic Association. Retrieved 14 September 2012. 
  11. ^ a b "Medical Boards: Osteopathic". Castle Connolly Medical Ltd. 2012. Retrieved 24 September 2012. 
  12. ^ "CAQ". American Osteopathic Board of Anesthesiology. 2012. Retrieved 14 September 2012. 

External links[edit]