American Pie Presents: Beta House

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American Pie Presents: Beta House
American Pie 6.jpg
Home media release cover
Directed by Andrew Waller
Produced by W. K. Border
Written by Erik Lindsay
Based on characters 
by Adam Herz
Starring John White
Steve Talley
Christopher McDonald
Eugene Levy
Music by Jeff Cardoni
Cinematography Gerald Packer
Editing by Rod Dean
Andrew Somers
Studio Neo Art & Logic
Rogue Pictures
Universal Pictures
Distributed by Universal Pictures
Release dates December 26, 2007
Running time 85 minutes
Country Canada
United States
Language English
Budget $10 million[1]
Box office $18,552,332[2]

American Pie Presents: Beta House is a 2007 American teen comedy film released by Universal Pictures. It is the third spin-off to American Pie film series franchise and a sequel to the second spin-off, American Pie Presents: The Naked Mile (2006). John White stars as Erik Stifler, a college freshman who pledges the Beta House fraternity led by his cousin, Dwight Stifler (Steve Talley). Christopher McDonald co-stars as Erik's father and Eugene Levy plays Beta House alumnus Noah Levenstein.

Universal commissioned the film after positive commercial reaction to The Naked Mile. Erik Lindsay and W.K. Border, the writer and producer, respectively, as well as four of the five principal cast members from the preceding film returned. Principal photography took place for seven to eight weeks from June 4, 2007 in Toronto, Canada.

American Pie Presents: Beta House was released direct-to-DVD internationally on December 10, 2007 and in the United States on December 26, 2007. The film was a moderate financial success, generating US$18.55 million in United States sales. It received generally negative reviews from film critics.

Plot[edit]

The following fall semester after the events of The Naked Mile, Erik Stifler and his friend Mike "Cooze" Coozeman arrive at the University of Michigan as freshmen. Upon arriving at his dorm, Erik meets a cute girl named Ashley taking a shower in the coed bathrooms, his new roommate Bobby while a cute girl is riding Bobby, and his cousin Dwight Stifler, the leader of the Beta House fraternity, who invites Erik, Cooze, and Bobby to a Beta House party. They learn how they can gain eligibility to pledge for the Beta House and meet Wesley, the rush chair of the Beta House who experiences blackouts after drinking alcohol.

Erik and Ashley begin dating. On their first date, Erik accidentally gets hot soup poured all over himself, so Ashley brings him to her room to clean up. As she puts lotion on Erik's burns, he accidentally ejaculates over her possessions. Erik apologizes and explains to Ashley that he has not ejaculated for a few months. At the same time Cooze falls for Ashley's roommate Denise however she is nervous to show him her genitalia but she gives him handjobs. After talking with Erik, Bobby, and Dwight about Denise, Cooze develops suspicions Denise might have a penis and Dwight encourages Cooze to find out.

Alongside two other pledges, Erik, Cooze, and Bobby complete fifty tasks to pledge the Beta House, including getting their posteriors signed by a stripper, having sex with a professor, marrying a male friend in Canada, and placing a live ostrich in the Geek House. After they complete their final task Edgar, the president of the Geek House, challenges the Beta House to the Greek Olympiad. Beta House alumni Noah Levenstein returns to campus to officiate the contest. The first competition is won by Beta House as Dwight and Edgar compete in removing girls' bras. Geek House win the next two competitions: a light saber duel and catching a greased pig. Beta House win the fourth and fifth competitions: a Russian roulette challenge between Dwight and Edgar with horse semen, and a drinking competition won by Wesley. Dwight learns that Edgar previously had sex with a sheep and the Beta House use his wool fetish against him in the final striptease challenge with a sheep costume, resulting in the Geek House losing the Greek Olympiad.

The Beta House host a toga party where Cooze finally sleeps with Denise and his suspicions are unfounded. The following morning Wesley wakes up after a blackout discovering he had sex with Geek House bodybuilder. In a post-credits scene, Edgar instructs a stripper at Silver Dollar to dance with the headpiece of the sheep costume.[3]

Cast[edit]

  • John White as Erik Stifler, a freshman pledging the Beta House
  • Steve Talley as Dwight Stifler, the pledge master and leader of the Beta House
  • Christopher McDonald as Mr. Stifler, Erik's father
  • Eugene Levy as Noah Levenstein, Beta House alumni and the officiator of the Greek Olympiad
  • Meghan Heffern as Ashley, Erik's love interest
  • Jake Siegel as Mike "Cooze" Coozeman, Erik's friend and a freshman pledging the Beta House alongside Erik and Bobby
  • Nic Nac as Bobby, Erik's roommate and a freshman pledging the Beta House alongside Erik and Cooze
  • Jonathan Keltz as Wesley, a member and the rush chair of the Beta House
  • Bradford Anderson as Jake Parker, a handicapped member of the Geek House
  • Robbie Amell as Nick Anderson, a freshman pledging the Beta House
  • Chris Violette as Frat Guy #1
  • Erica Cox as Candy

Production[edit]

Christopher McDonald (left) and Eugene Levy reprised their roles from The Naked Mile

American Pie Presents: The Naked Mile, the second spin-off to the American Pie film series, was a commercial success, and Universal Pictures prepared for a sequel. The Naked Mile's writer, Erik Lindsay, pitched the film by saying "Look, we're not going to top Animal House of course, but it's been 25 years. I was in a fraternity for six years. Let's just make a straight pledging movie."[4] Universal gave Lindsay the green light to write Beta House, and also hired Andrew Waller and The Naked Mile's producer, W. K. Border, as the film's director and producer, respectively.[5] The film's screenplay was based on characters by Adam Herz and on aspects of Lindsay's own life.[6][7] Lindsay felt that Universal being unworried to make the film similar to Animal House provided "more opportunities to keep the story organic," which he found the challenge of writing a sequel.[4]

The film features the same principal cast as The Naked Mile minus Jessy Schram;[8] John White, Steve Talley, Christopher McDonald and Eugene Levy reprised their roles from the preceding film, with Levy returning to play Noah Levenstein for the sixth time in the series.[3] Craig Kornblau, the president of Universal Studios Home Entertainment, said "we think he [Levy] is crucial to this franchise because his character represents the heart of the movie."[1] Jake Siegel, Jaclyn A. Smith, Dan Petronijevic and Jordan Prentice also reprised their roles from The Naked Mile.[3]

Principal photography began on June 4, 2007 and lasted about "seven [to] eight weeks."[9][10] Filming took place at the University of Toronto, Pinewood Toronto Studios and at the Brass Rail strip club in Toronto.[6][11][12] Neo Art & Logic, Rogue Pictures and Universal Pictures produced the film on a budget of less than $10 million.[1] The film was intended to be the center of a trilogy beginning with The Naked Mile and although talks for a concluding sequel were made, no such film has yet materalised.[6][8]

Release[edit]

American Pie Presents: Beta House was released direct-to-DVD internationally on December 10, 2007 and in the United States on December 26, 2007. It was marketed with the tagline "the most outrageous slice of pie!"[3] The film was released in two single-disc DVD editions. The R-rated edition included no special features, while the unrated edition included a commentary track, behind-the-scenes clips, deleted scenes and storylines, a fake public service announcement, featurettes, outtakes, a mock in-character interview with Noah Levenstein, music videos by God Made Me Funky, and a 30 Rock episode.[13] Through its first four weeks the DVD sold over 534,000 copies in the United States, generating $12.25 million in sales.[2] Universal Pictures expected to sell more than a million units;[1] sales have since totaled over 898,000 units in the United States, with $18.55 million in revenue.[2]

The film received generally negative reviews from film critics. LaRue Cook of Entertainment Weekly graded the film with a "D" and wrote, "what was once a fresh slice of teen comedy has become a slab of stale crudeness."[14] Scott Weinberg of Moviefone, in his negative review, found the film "slightly more amusing to sit through than the two previous entries", in particular praising the Star Trek sexual roleplay scene as "extremely effective."[15] DVD Talk's Jeffrey Robinson writes that "if anything, it will bore you and leave you wondering why you wasted an hour and a half of your life."[13] Writing in JoBlo.com, Adam Quigley poked fun at the film's themes, declaring that "if there's a lesson to be taken from these films, it's that women are objects, and should always be treated as such".[16] IGN's Hock Teh gave the film 5/10, writing that it "stays very close to the American Pie formula," while criticizing the story as "devoid of anything remotely semi-compelling or even noteworthy."[17] Peter Hammond of Maxim describes American Pie Presents: Beta House as "loaded with sex, laughs and raunchy fun," writing that it "may be the most outrageous slice of pie yet!"[11]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Barnes, Brooks (28 January 2008). "Direct-to-DVD Releases Shed Their Loser Label". The New York Times. Retrieved 28 September 2011. 
  2. ^ a b c "American Pie Presents: Beta House – DVD Sales". The Numbers. Retrieved 28 September 2011. 
  3. ^ a b c d American Pie Presents: Beta House (DVD) (Standard ed.). Universal Pictures. 10 December 2007. 
  4. ^ a b Topel, Fred. "Interview with Erik Lindsay from American Pie Presents: Beta House". About.com. Retrieved 4 November 2011. 
  5. ^ Vukcevic, Filip. "Set Visit: American Pie Presents: Beta House -- Part One - Page 1". IGN. Retrieved 5 November 2011. 
  6. ^ a b c Vukcevic, Filip. "Set Visit: American Pie Presents: Beta House -- Part Two - Page 1". IGN. Retrieved 24 August 2008. 
  7. ^ "Lindsay's Movies Pay Off Partying Debts". World Entertainment News Network. 3 January 2008. Retrieved 4 November 2011. 
  8. ^ a b Topel, Fred. "Interview with John White from American Pie Presents: Beta House". About.com. Retrieved 3 November 2011. 
  9. ^ "From Universal Studios Home Entertainment- American Pie Presents: Beta House Begins Principal Photography in Toronto". PR Newswire. Retrieved 5 November 2011. 
  10. ^ Vukcevic, Filip. "Set Visit: American Pie Presents: Beta House -- Part Two - Page 2". IGN. Retrieved 3 November 2011. 
  11. ^ a b American Pie Presents: Beta House (DVD) (Unrated ed.). Universal Pictures. 10 December 2007. 
  12. ^ Spence, Rebecca (12 April 2011). "From Universal Studios Home Entertainment- American Pie Presents: Beta House Begins Principal Photography in Toronto". National Post. Retrieved 5 November 2011. 
  13. ^ a b Robinson, Jeffrey (12 January 2008). "American Pie Presents: Beta House". DVD Talk. Retrieved 3 November 2011. 
  14. ^ Cook, LaRue (4 January 2008). "American Pie Presents: Beta House". Entertainment Weekly. Archived from the original on 20 September 2008. Retrieved 24 August 2008. 
  15. ^ Weinberg, Scott (17 December 2007). "DVD Review: American Pie Presents Beta House". Moviefone. Retrieved 24 August 2008. 
  16. ^ Quigley, Adam. "American Pie Presents: Beta House DVD review by The Digital Dorm". Joblo.com. Retrieved 3 November 2011. 
  17. ^ Teh, Hock (30 December 2007). "American Pie Presents: Beta House (Unrated) DVD Review". IGN. Retrieved 3 November 2011. 

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