Amjad Ali Shah

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Amjad Ali Shah
King of Oudh
AmjadAliShah.jpg
Flag of Awadh.svg 4th King of Oudh
Reign7 May 1842 – 13 February 1847
Coronation17 May 1842, Farhat Bakhsh Palace, Lucknow
PredecessorMuhammad Ali Shah
SuccessorWajid Ali Shah
Bornbefore 30 January 1801
Lucknow
Died13 February 1847 (1847-02-14)
Farhat Bakhsh Palace, Lucknow
Burial
Imambara Sibtainabad, Hazratganj, Lucknow
Wives
  • Malka Ahad Begum[1]
  • Malka Kaiswar[2]
Full name
Najmud-Daulah Abul Muzaffar Musleh-uddin Muhammad AMJAD ALI SHAH
HouseNishapuri
DynastyOudh
FatherMuhammad Ali Shah
ReligionShia Islam

Amjad Ali Shah (b. c. 1801 – d. 13 February 1847) was the fourth King of Oudh from 7 May 1842 to 13 February 1847.[3][4]

Administration[edit]

His reign began in May 1842.[4] His administration was responsible for a new bridge over the river Gomti and a metalled road from Lucknow to Kanpur.[4][5] He also built the Hazratganj and Aminabad Bazar, major shopping markets in Lucknow.[5]

Death[edit]

He died of cancer[6] on 13 February 1847 at the age of 47 years. He is buried at Imambara Sibtainabad in the western part of Hazratganj, Lucknow.[1] He was succeeded by his son Wajid Ali Shah.

Sons of Amjad Ali Shah
Doresetoter[8]
Suliman Kudr[8]
Preceded by
Mo`in ad-Din Abu´l-Fath Mohammad `Ali Shah
Padshah-e-Oudh, Shah-e Zaman
7 May 1842 – 13 Feb 1847
Succeeded by
Naser ad-Din `Abd al-Mansur Mohammad Wajed `Ali Shah

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Lucknow Sightseeing Tours, Lucknow Travel Directory, Lucknow Tourism Guide, Arts & Culture of Lucknow, Places of Interest in Lucknow Archived 21 November 2008 at the Wayback Machine
  2. ^ Childrens Wajid Ali Shah(Son), Ashraf un nisa Begum Malikai Douran Nawab Afsar Bahu Sahiba(Daughter) "ApnaLucknow- Your guide to the City of Nawabs: Tourist Section". Archived from the original on 27 October 2009.
  3. ^ Princely States of India
  4. ^ a b c "HISTORY OF AWADH (Oudh) a princely State of India by Hameed Akhtar Siddiqui". Archived from the original on 1 September 2001. Retrieved 23 October 2009.
  5. ^ a b NAWABS OF OUDH & THEIR SECULARISM – Dr. B. S. Saxena
  6. ^ Tornos India – About Us – Nawabs of Avadh Archived 10 October 2008 at the Wayback Machine
  7. ^ Published in The Illustrated London News, 1857.
  8. ^ a b Attributed to Felice Beato, 1858–1859.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ title after death

External links[edit]