Amnesty International UK Media Awards 1997

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The awards were hosted by Janet Suzman on 18 June 1997 - Park Lane Hotel, London.[1]

There were 7 awards in 6 categories: National Print, Periodicals, Photojournalism, Radio, Television Documentary and Television News. Two awards were issued in the National Print category.

The overall winner was Lindsey Hilsum, Diplomatic Correspondent for the ITN Channel Four News Team for her body of work over through 1996-97 from Rwanda and the former Zaire (Now Democratic Republic of the Congo)

The year's judges for all categories Keiko Itoh,[a] John Mortimer QC, Norma Johnston,[b] Sharon Welch,[c] Marc Riboud, Cristina Odone and James Naughtie.[1][2][3]

Following the awards, Peter Bottomley MP placed an Early day motion before the UK Parliament requesting that parliament agree "That this House notes the importance of the Amnesty International Press Awards, ...recognises that links with victims are usually achieved through the Press and broadcasters; and acknowledges that the search for the truth is sometimes a ticket to jail or worse for journalists."[4]

Awards 1997[edit]

1997
Category Title Organisation Journalists Refs
National Print
Joint Winners
Articles from Afghanistan The Daily Telegraph Alex Spillius [5][6]

“Black Gold Fuels Columbia Killing Machine” The Observer David Harrison
Melissa Jones
[5][7]

Periodicals
“Where Girls are Killed for Going to School” Marie Claire Lara Marlowe [8][9]
[10]
Photojournalism
“The Highway to Hell” Gary Knight [11][12]
[13]
Radio
“Chocolate Soldier from the USA” BBC Radio South Marc Jobst
George Pixley
[14][15]
[16][17][18]
Television
Documentary
“Rwanda - The Betrayal” Blackstone Pictures for
Channel Four Witness
Lindsey Hilsum
Peter Bate
[19][20]
[21]
Television
News
“Women under the Veil” ITN Channel Four News Saira Shah [22][23]
[24]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ At the time of the 1997 Awards, Keiko Itoh was Media Relations Consultant for The World Bank
  2. ^ At the time of the 1997 Awards, Moram Johnston was Communications Director for Amnesty International UK
  3. ^ At the time of the 1997 Awards, Sharon Welch was Director of the London Millennium Festival

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Amnesty UK Press Office (29 April 1996). "AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL PRESS AWARDS 1997 MARC RIBOUD JOINS PANEL OF JUDGES 29 April 1996". Amensty International UK (AIUK). Archived from the original on 30 May 1997. Retrieved 18 January 2013. 
  2. ^ "AIUK Press Release 29 April 1996 AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL PRESS AWARDS 1997 MARC RIBOUD JOINS PANEL OF JUDGES 29 April 1996". Archived from the original on 30 May 1997. Retrieved June 1, 2016. 
  3. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 11 February 2006. Retrieved 17 January 2013. 
  4. ^ Bottomley Peter (June 1997). "Early day motion 143 AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL PRESS AWARDS Date tabled: 18.06.1997". House of Commons business papers (Session: 1997-98). Archived from the original on 18 January 2013. That this House notes the importance of the Amnesty International Press Awards; congratulates David Harrison with Melissa Jones of The Observer for articles about oil companies' role in Columbia, Lara Marlowe of Marie Claire for the investigation in Algeria 'Where Girls are Killed for Going to School', Saira Shah and her colleagues in Channel Four News-ITN for the filming in Kabul under the Taliban 'Women Under the Veil', Lindsey Hilsum with Peter Bate of Blackstone Pictures for Channel 4's Witness programme 'Rwanda-The Betrayed', Marc Jobst and his collegues [sic] for BBC Radio 4's 'Chocolate Soldier from the USA', and photojournalist Gary Knight and Time Magazine International for 'The Highway to Hell'; recognises that links with victims are usually achieved through the Press and broadcasters; and acknowledges that the search for the truth is sometimes a ticket to jail or worse for journalists. 
  5. ^ a b "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 29 January 2006. Retrieved 17 January 2013. 
  6. ^ "The Daily Telegraph Journalists Alex Spillius". The Telegraph. Telegraph Media Group Limited. 18 January 2013. Archived from the original on 18 January 2013. Retrieved 18 January 2013. 
  7. ^ Harrison, David; Jones, Mellisa (20 October 1996). "Black Gold Fuels Columbia Killing Machine". The Observer. 
  8. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 14 May 2006. Retrieved 17 January 2013. 
  9. ^ Clifford Thompson (1 February 2002). Current Biography Yearbook 2001. Hw Wilson Company. p. 13. ISBN 978-0-8242-1016-8. Retrieved 18 January 2013. 
  10. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 19 May 2011. Retrieved 18 January 2013. 
  11. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 29 January 2006. Retrieved 17 January 2013. 
  12. ^ "Evidence: War Crimes in Congo. 1997". garyknightphotography.com Garry Knight Photo Journalist. Gary Knight. Archived from the original on 16 January 2013. Retrieved 16 January 2013. 
  13. ^ Knight, Gary. "A female Rwandan Hutu refugee lies close to death in the back of an MSF truck after surviving a massacre by rwandan Tutsi guerillas. The refugees had been without food, water or medical aid for several days". Seven by VII. The Digital Journalist. Archived from the original on 18 January 2013. 
  14. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 29 January 2006. Retrieved 17 January 2013. 
  15. ^ "High in the saddle with guitar string twanging". The Independent. 16 March 1997. 
  16. ^ Amnesty International UK (AIUK). "BBC Radio South "Chocolate Soldier from the USA" produced by Marc Jobst, presented by George Pixley". Archived from the original on 29 January 2006. Retrieved 18 January 2013. In England, African Americans and Latinos made up 100% of the people executed for rape. No white soldier was executed for rape in England. And an analysis of that value seems to indicate that they executed people who were the lowest of the low in terms of their social characteristics, not because of the crime that was committed. I know of an instance where a white soldier was convicted of raping a 16-year-old girl, he was a commander and ended up getting 30 days. He was also very articulate, he had a very good defence and he was in a crucial position that the command could not afford to lose. It had nothing to do with justice at all, but it has to do with maintaining discipline The US army was very concerned that black soldiers particularly did not learn to act differently when they were away from home and race was one way they could be reminded of their place. 
  17. ^ BBC. Chocolate Soldier From the USA (PDF). WNKU - NKU's National Public Radio station. Archived from the original (PDF) on 9 June 2010. US Broadcast 
  18. ^ Amnesty: The Journal of the British Section of Amnesty International, Issues 59-86. The Section. 1993. p. 79. Black soldiers who fought in the European theatre of operations in World War II were treated shamefully - and still are, said Marc Jobst 
  19. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 29 January 2006. Retrieved 17 January 2013. 
  20. ^ "Rwanda - The Betrayal". Witness. 16 May 1996. Channel 4. Archived from the original on 18 January 2013. Library Synopisis "The atrocities in Rwanda two years ago, when members of the Hutu majority slaughtered thousands of men, women and children from the Tutsi minority, are thought to be the worst committed since the Nazi holocaust. The programme examines how this could be allowed to happen in a country where 70% of the population is Catholic. The programme talks to the survivors and asks why the churches were unable to provide sanctuary for the terrified people who fled there for protection. Also examines the moral confusions faced be people confronting personal disaster, including a Hutu woman whose own brother took part in the murder of her Tutsi husband and children" 
  21. ^ Lindsey Hilsum (16 May 1996). Channel Four Witness "Rwanda - The Betrayal" presented by Lindsey Hilsum produced and directed by Peter Bate of Blackstone Pictures (Video). Rwanda: Channel 4. Archived from the original on 11 October 1997. I think the ethnic element was at play. In the country, according to official propaganda it was Tutsis who had attacked the Hutus, for certain. So there were some even among the priests and perhaps the bishops who believed that it was legitimate defence to kill people of the other ethnic groups."..."How can they be good Christians, those who destroyed the church? They killed people inside the church, then came to pray in it. People fled to the church. They thought they would be saved but it became the worst place to be. It was where most people died. 
  22. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 29 January 2006. Retrieved 17 January 2013. 
  23. ^ Saira Shah. Afghanistan: Taliban Regime – Ref: BSP281096024. ITV Networks, ITN. 'Hunger itself is a weapon. My children cling to me and beg for food. They'd be better off dying instantly from a rocket.' Since the Taliban came to power, she hasn't been able to leave her home to search for food, because she says she cannot obey the demands that she must be covered from head to foot. 'They don't care about my problems. A full length veil costs twelve pounds. I can't afford that. I can't even afford food.' At this orphanage boys still receive a basic education but since the Taliban arrived the girls remain locked away on the top floor of the building. Visitors are shown around the boys areas only. 
  24. ^ Saira Shah. Afghanistan: Taliban Regime – Ref: BSP281096036. ITV Networks, ITN. Channel Four smuggled the camera inside the girls floor. There are 75 of them here crammed into a couple of rooms. Facilities are basic. The girls lessons have been stopped. They've spent the last 4 weeks in their dormitories. 'We used to go outside to play, but since the Taliban came we can't,' says this girl. Only 2 female staff members have braved the Taliban to come into work. They're angry at the conditions here. 

External links[edit]