Amy Brand

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Amy Brand (née Pierce)
Born1962
Upper West Side, Manhattan
ResidenceNewton, Massachusetts
EducationB.A. in linguistics, Barnard College
PhD in cognitive science, MIT
OccupationDirector of MIT Press
Years activeJuly 2015-present
Spouse(s)Matt Brand
Websitehttps://www.linkedin.com/in/amybrand

Amy Brand (born October 20, 1962) a leader in the field of scholarly communication and research information, is the current Director of the MIT Press, a position she assumed in July 2015. Previously, Brand served as the Assistant Provost of Faculty Appointments and Information at Harvard University, and as a Vice President at Digital Science.[1]

Background[edit]

Amy Brand grew up in the Upper West Side of Manhattan, where she attended Barnard College. She moved to Cambridge, Massachusetts in 1985 for graduate school, and has lived mainly in the Boston area since then.[2]

Education[edit]

Brand received a Bachelor of Arts in linguistics from Barnard College. She graduated in 1989 with a PhD in cognitive science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.[2]

Career[edit]

Brand was a postdoc at the Institute for Research in Cognitive Science at the University of Pennsylvania from 1989 until 1992, conducting research in child language development, but ultimately decided to switch careers and move into academic publishing. Her first position was as an acquisitions editor at Lawrence Erlbaum Associates in 1992.[3]

In 1994, Brand was hired by the MIT Press as a cognitive science editor for Bradford Books, MIT Press' cognitive science imprint.[3] Brand was instrumental in developing CogNet, MIT Press' digital cognitive science collection – one of the first online academic communities of its kind.[4]

From 2000 to 2008, Brand served as CrossRef's Director of Business and Product Development.[5] In 2008, Brand was hired by Harvard University as the Program Manager of the Office for Scholarly Communication.[2] She was later promoted to university-wide Assistant Provost for Faculty Appointments and Information.[1] Beginning in early 2014, Brand served as VP of Academic and Research Relations as well as Vice president of North America at Digital Science.[6]

MIT Press Directorship[edit]

After an extensive search led by a committee of both MIT-affiliates and external academic publishing experts, Brand was named Director of the MIT Press in July 2015. Chris Bourg, director of the MIT Libraries, stated that Brand’s “breadth of experience across many sectors of the scholarly communication system make her the ideal leader of the MIT Press at this time of tremendous change and opportunity in scholarly publishing.”[1] As Director, Brand leads the Press through all areas of development, including trade acquisition and growing MIT Press’s books and journal digital offerings.[7]

Honors and Organizations[edit]

In 2015, Brand was awarded the Award for Meritorious Achievement by the Council of Science Editors (CSE). This award is the highest given by the CSE, and is given to “a person or institution that embraces the purposes of the CSE – the improvement of scientific communication through the pursuit of high standards in all activities connected with editing.”[8]

Brand currently serves on the Board on Research Data and Information of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine.[9] She is also on the DuraSpace Board of Directors,[6] and chairs of the academic advisory board of Altmetric, a commercial service that tracks how works of scholarship are discussed online.[10]

She was a co-creator of the CRediT taxonomy to reliably track contributions to team-based research outputs.[11] She was a founding member of the ORCID Board,[12] and advises on a number of community initiatives in digital scholarship.[6]

Publications[edit]

  • On the emergence of syntax: A crosslinguistic study[13]
  • Neuropsychological reasons for a transformational analysis of verbal passive[14]
  • Language acquisition and syntactic theory: A comparative analysis of French and English child grammars[15]
  • The acquisition of passives in Spanish and the question of A-chain maturation[16]
  • Negation and functional projections in early grammar[17]
  • Crosslinguistic evidence for functional projections in early child grammar, Language acquisition studies in generative grammar[18]
  • CrossRef turns one[19]
  • CrossRef: the reference linking backbone for scholarly electronic publication[20]
  • Metadata demystified: A guide for publishers[21]
  • Linking evolved: The future of online research.[22]
  • Publishers joining forces through CrossRef[23]
  • CrossRef and the research experience[24]
  • CrossRef Search, Serials 17 (3)[25]
  • CrossRef: beyond journal reference linking.[26]
  • CROSSREF: From linking to cross-provider search[27]
  • Mini-profile: a day in the life of a business development executive[28]
  • CrossRef: Towards the future, with T. Kumagai[29]
  • Key Issue: CrossCheck[30]
  • Encyclopedia of Library and Information Sciences[31]
  • Beyond mandate and repository, toward sustainable faculty self-archiving[32]
  • Planning and Promoting the Creation of Scientific Knowledge: Three Perspectives[33]
  • Faculty appointments and the record of scholarship[34]
  • Point of View: Faculty Appointments and the Record of Scholarship[35]
  • Credit where credit is due[36]
  • Beyond authorship: attribution, contribution, collaboration, and credit[37]
  • Publishing returns to the Academy[38]
  • Report from the "What is Publishing?"(1) Workgroup[39]
  • Demographics of scholarly publishing and communication professionals[40]

Personal life[edit]

Brand lives in Newton, Massachusetts with her husband, Matthew Brand, and has three children.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Dizikes, Peter. MIT News Office. "Amy Brand Named New Director of the MIT Press." MIT News. MIT University, 15 June 2015. Web. 19 Dec. 2016.
  2. ^ a b c d "Professional Profile: Amy Brand." Society for Scholarly Publishing. Society for Scholarly Publishing, January 2009. Web. 19 December 2016.
  3. ^ a b "Professional Profile: Amy Brand." Society for Scholarly Publishing. Society for Scholarly Publishing, n.d. Web. 19 Dec. 2016.
  4. ^ Manaktala, Gita. "Meet New Press Director Amy Brand (part Two)." MIT Press. MIT Press, 1 Oct. 2015. Web. 19 Dec. 2016.
  5. ^ Manaktala, Gita. "Meet New Press Director Amy Brand (part One)." MIT Press. MIT Press, 12 Aug. 2015. Web. 19 Dec. 2016.
  6. ^ a b c “Amy Brand." Digital Science. N.p., n.d. Web. 19 Dec. 2016.
  7. ^ Laloup, Jen. "Scholarly Books in the Digital World: An Interview Featuring Amy Brand." PLOScast. 12 July 2016. Web. 19 Dec. 2016.
  8. ^ Digital Science. "Amy Brand, Digital Science, Receives 2015 CSE Award for Meritorious Achievement." PR Newswire. Cision, 18 May 2015. Web. 19 Dec. 2016.
  9. ^ Policy and Global Affairs Division. "Members." Board on Research Data and Information. The National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine, 2016. Web. 19 December 2016.
  10. ^ Liu, Jean. "Introducing the Altmetric Advisory Board." Altmetric. 19 May 2016. Web. 19 December 2016.
  11. ^ "Working Groups." CRediT. CASARI, n.d. Web. 19 Dec. 2016.
  12. ^ Orcid. "Amy Brand." Orcid: Connecting Research and Researchers. Orcid, n.d. Web. 19 December 2016.
  13. ^ Pierce, Amy. “On the emergence of syntax: A crosslinguistic study.” Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dept. of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, 1989.
  14. ^ Grodzinsky, Yosef, Amy Pierce, Susan Marakovitz. “Neuropsychological reasons for a transformational analysis of verbal passive.” Natural Language & Linguistic Theory 9 (3), 431-453, 1991.
  15. ^ Pierce, Amy. “Language acquisition and syntactic theory: A comparative analysis of French and English child grammars.” Kluwer Academic Pub, 1992.
  16. ^ Pierce, Amy. “The acquisition of passives in Spanish and the question of A-chain maturation.” Language Acquisition 2 (1), 55-81, 1992.
  17. ^ Déprez, Viviane, Amy Pierce. “Negation and functional projections in early grammar.” Linguistic Inquiry, 25-67, 1993.
  18. ^ Déprez, Viviane, Amy Pierce. “Crosslinguistic evidence for functional projections in early child grammar.” Language acquisition studies in generative grammar: papers in honor of Kenneth Wexler from the 1991 GLOW workshops, 1994.
  19. ^ Brand, Amy. “CrossRef turns one.” Corporation for National Research Initiatives, 2001.
  20. ^ A Brand, E Pentz. “CrossRef: the reference linking backbone for scholarly electronic publication.” ONLINE INFORMATION-INTERNATIONAL MEETING-, 183-186, 2001.
  21. ^ Brand, Amy, Frank Daly, Barbara Meyers. “Metadata demystified: A guide for publishers.” Sheridan Press and Niso Press, 2003.
  22. ^ Brand, Amy, Kristen Fisher. "Linking evolved: The future of online research.”, Scientific Computing World, 12-14, 2003.
  23. ^ Brand, Amy. “Publishers joining forces through CrossRef.” Serials Review 30 (1), 3-9, 2004.
  24. ^ Brand, Amy. “CrossRef and the research experience.” Learned publishing 17 (3), 225-230, 2004.
  25. ^ Brand, Amy. “CrossRef Search.” Serials 17 (3), 291-292, 2004.
  26. ^ Brand, Amy, Chuck Koscher. “CrossRef: beyond journal reference linking.” Serials 18 (3), 2005.
  27. ^ Brand, Amy. “CROSSREF: From linking to cross-provider search.” The Serials Librarian 50 (1-2), 119-124, 2006.
  28. ^ Brand, Amy. “Mini-profile: a day in the life of a business development executive.” Serials 19 (2), 83-84, 2006.
  29. ^ Brand, Amy. Transl. Kumagai. “CrossRef: Towards the future.” Journal of Information Processing and management, 50, 558-568, 2007.
  30. ^ Brand, Amy. “Key Issue: CrossCheck.” Serials 21 (1), 54-55, 2008.
  31. ^ Brand, Amy. “Encyclopedia of Library and Information Sciences.” 2009.
  32. ^ Brand, Amy. “Beyond mandate and repository, toward sustainable faculty self-archiving.” Learned Publishing 25 (1), 29-34, 2012.
  33. ^ Scholarly Communication Symposium, Amy Brand, Lynne Herndon, Micah Altman. “Planning and Promoting the Creation of Scientific Knowledge: Three Perspectives.” Georgetown University, Lauinger Library, 2012.
  34. ^ Brand, Amy. “Faculty appointments and the record of scholarship.” eLife 2, e00452, 2013.
  35. ^ Brand, Amy. “Point of View: Faculty Appointments and the Record of Scholarship.” Life Sciences Publications, Ltd., 2013.
  36. ^ Allen, Liz, Amy Brand, Jo Scott, Micah Altman, Marjorie Hlava. “Credit where credit is due.” Nature 508 (7496), 312-313, 2014.
  37. ^ Brand, Amy, Liz Allen, Micah Altman, Marjorie Hlava, Jo Scott. “Beyond authorship: attribution, contribution, collaboration, and credit.” Learned Publishing 28 (2), 151-155, 2015.
  38. ^ Goldstone, Heather MH, Susan Skomal, Michael Markie, Amy Brand, Joshua P Gray. “Publishing returns to the Academy.” MBLWHOI Library, 2015.
  39. ^ Brand, Amy, James Butcher, Meg Buzzi, Kathleen Fitzpatrick, Ann Gabriel, Rikk Mulligan, Vivian Siegel, Matt Spitzer, Jamie Vernon. “Report from the ‘What is Publishing?’(1) Workgroup.” Open Scholarship Initiative Proceedings 1, 2016.
  40. ^ Greco, Albert N., Robert M. Wharton, Amy Brand. “Demographics of scholarly publishing and communication professionals.” Learned Publishing, 2016.