House of Nationalities

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House of Nationalities
အမျိုးသားလွှတ်တော်
Amyotha Hluttaw
2nd Amyotha Hluttaw
State seal of Myanmar.svg
Type
Type
History
Founded 31 January 2011 (2011-01-31)
Preceded by People's Assembly (1974-1988)
Leadership
Mahn Win Khaing Than, NLD
Since 3 February 2016
Deputy Speaker
Aye Thar Aung, ANP
Since 3 February 2016
Structure
Seats 224 MPs
Distribution of seats in the Amyotha Hluttaw
Amyotha Hluttaw political groups

     NLD (135)
     USDP (11)
     ANP (10)
     SNLD (3)
     TNP (2)
     ZCD (2)
     MNP (1)
     NUP (1)
     PNO (1)
     Independents (2)

     Military (56)
Elections
Amyotha Hluttaw last election
8 November 2015
Meeting place
Hluttaw Complex, Naypyidaw
Pyidaungsu Hluttaw Complex, Naypyidaw
Website
www.amyothahluttaw.gov.mm
State seal of Myanmar.svg
This article is part of a series on the
politics and government of
Myanmar

The House of Nationalities (Burmese: အမျိုးသားလွှတ်တော်, IPA: [ʔəmjóðá l̥ʊʔtɔ̀] Amyotha Hluttaw) is the upper house of the Pyidaungsu Hluttaw, the bicameral legislature of Myanmar (Burma). It consists of 224 member of which 168 are directly elected and 56 appointed by the Myanmar Armed Forces. The last elections to the Amyotha Hluttaw were held in November 2015.[1] At its second meeting on 3 February 2016, Mahn Win Khaing Than and Aye Thar Aung were elected Speaker and Deputy Speaker of the Amyotha Hluttaw and Speaker and Deputy Speaker of the Pyidaungsu Hluttaw as a whole.[2]

Composition[edit]

House of Nationalities (Amyotha Hluttaw) consists of 224 members including with the 168 directly elected and 56 appointed by the Myanmar Armed Forces. The representatives are elected in equal numbers of 12 representatives from each state or region inclusive of relevant Union territories and including one representative from each Self-Administered Division or Self-Administered Zone.[3]

Amyothahluttaw (Upper House) Total
Amyotha Hluttaw Representatives 168
Representatives of Army 56

2016-present[edit]

Amyotha Hluttaw elections, 2015[4]
Party Seats Net gain/loss Seats % Votes % Votes +/−
  NLD 135 Increase132 60.27
  USDP 11 Decrease113 4.91
  ANP 10 Increase4 4.46
  SNLD 3 Increase2 1.34
  TNP 2 Increase2 0.89
  ZCD 2 Increase2 0.89
  MNP 1 Increase1 0.45
  NUP 1 Decrease4 0.45
  PNO 1 Increase1 0.45
  Independent 2 Increase2 0.89
  AMRDP 0 Decrease4 0
  SNDP 0 Decrease3 0
  Others 0 Decrease18 0
  Military appointees 56 Steady 25.00 0
Total 224 100
Amyotha Hluttaw by Regions and States, 2015
Region/State NLD USDP ANP SNLD ZCD PNO TNP MNP NUP Independent Total
Kachin State 10 1 1 12
Kayah State 9 2 1 12
Kayin State 10 2 12
Chin State 9 1 2 12
Mon State 11 1 12
Rakhine State 1 1 10 12
Shan State 3 3 3 1 2[5] 12
Sagaing Region 12 12
Tanintharyi Region 12 12
Bago Region 12 12
Magway Region 12 12
Mandalay Region 10 2 12
Yangon Region 12 12
Ayeyarwady Region 12 12
Total 135 11 10 3 2 1 2 1 1 2 168

2015 results are as of 20 November 2015. Military appointees are not included in the Amyotha Hluttaw by Regions and States, 2015 table.[6]

2011–2016[edit]

General election, 2010
Party Seats[7] %
Union Solidarity and Development Party 129 57.59
Rakhine Nationalities Development Party 7 3.13
National Unity Party 5 2.23
National Democratic Force 4 1.79
All Mon Region Democracy Party 4 1.79
Chin Progressive Party 4 1.79
Shan Nationalities Democratic Party 3 1.33
Phalon-Sawaw Democratic Party 3 1.33
Chin National Party 2 0.89
Pa-O National Organisation 1 0.45
Kayin People's Party 1 0.45
Taaung (Palaung) National Party 1 0.45
Wa Democratic Party 1 0.45
Unity and Democracy Party of Kachin State 1 0.45
Kayin State Democracy and Development Party 1 0.45
Independent 1 0.45
Military appointees 56 25.00
Total 224 100
Changes between 2010 and 2012, which were not addressed by the 2012 by-election
Date Constituency Old MP Party New MP Party Note
August 2011 Rangoon Division No. 3 Phone Myint Aung NDF Phone Myint Aung NNDP Changed party membership[8]
December 2011 Rangoon Region No. 4 Myat Nyana Soe NDF Myat Nyana Soe NLD Changed party membership[9]
28 January 2012 Sagaing Division No. 2 Bogyi aka Aung Ngwe USDP Deceased[10]
By-election, 2012
Party Seats won Change Seats before Seats after[11]
Union Solidarity and Development Party 1 Decrease 5 128 123
Rakhine Nationalities Development Party 0 Steady 7 7
National Unity Party 0 Steady 5 5
National League for Democracy 4 Increase 4 1 5
National Democratic Force 0 Steady 2 2
New National Democracy Party 0 Steady 1 1
All Mon Region Democracy Party 0 Steady 4 4
Chin Progressive Party 0 Steady 4 4
Shan Nationalities Democratic Party 1 Increase 1 3 4
Phalon-Sawaw Democratic Party 0 Steady 3 3
Chin National Party 0 Steady 2 2
Pa-O National Organization 0 Steady 1 1
Kayin People's Party 0 Steady 1 1
Taaung (Palaung) National Party 0 Steady 1 1
Wa Democratic Party 0 Steady 1 1
Unity and Democracy Party of Kachin State 0 Steady 1 1
Kayin State Democracy and Development Party 0 Steady 1 1
Independent 0 Steady 1 1
Vacant 0 Steady 1 1
Military appointees 56 56
Total 6 Steady 224 224
Changes between 2012 and 2015
Date Constituency Old MP Party New MP Party Note
5 February 2013 Rangoon Division No. 6 Tin Shwe NDF Became a Deputy Minister[10]
2013 Arakan State No. 4 Maung Sa Pru RNDP Deceased[10]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Myanmar election commission publishes election final results". Xinhuanet. 17 November 2010. 
  2. ^ "Burma's parliament opens new session". BBC News. 31 January 2011. 
  3. ^ 2008 Constitution, Myanmar. Pg. Article 141 (a)
  4. ^ "Announcement 93/2015". Union Election Commission. Retrieved 20 November 2015. 
  5. ^ "Announcement 95/2015". Union Election Commission. Retrieved 26 November 2015. 
  6. ^ "Announcement 93/2015". Union Election Commission. Retrieved 20 November 2015. 
  7. ^ "Burma's 2010 Elections: A comprehensive report" (PDF). Burma Fund UN Office. 2011-01-31. Retrieved 2015-11-26. 
  8. ^ "New political party says it wants to work for a peaceful Burma". Mizzima. 2011-08-24. Retrieved 2015-11-24. 
  9. ^ "NDF MPs rejoin NLD". Mizzima. 2012-04-09. Retrieved 2015-11-24. 
  10. ^ a b c "National Assembly - Overview - Parliament Watch". ALTSEAN Burma. Retrieved 2015-11-24. 
  11. ^ "National Assembly - Overview - Parliament Watch". ALTSEAN Burma. Archived from the original on 2012-07-19. 

See also[edit]