Amza Pellea

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Amza Pellea
Born (1931-04-07)7 April 1931
Băilești, Dolj, Romania
Died 12 December 1983(1983-12-12) (aged 52)
Occupation Actor
Years active 1955-1983

Amza Pellea (Romanian pronunciation: [ˈamza ˈpele̯a]; 7 April 1931 – 12 December 1983) was a Romanian actor noted for playing Romanian national heroes on film.

He was born in Băilești, Oltenia, and attended the Carol I High School. He later played at the Craiova Theatre, then at the Small Theatre, Nottara Theatre, Comedy Theatre and the National Theatre Bucharest, being also a professor at the Academy of Theatre and Film in Bucharest.

Pellea played numerous comic and serious roles. In the cinema was most noted for his roles as historical leaders. His earliest leading roles were as Romanian national heroes, beginning with Decebalus in Dacii (1967) and Columna (1968). He also portrayed Michael the Brave in Mihai Viteazul (1971).

His most famous comic role was as "Nea Mărin" (Uncle Marin), a character representing the archetypal Oltenian peasant. Mărin first appeared in TV comedy sketches. The character graduated to the cinema in Nea Mărin miliardar (Uncle Marin, the Billionaire), in which Pellea played the dual role of the naive Marin and the American billionaire he is mistaken for. Nea Mărin miliardar is ranked 1 in the top most viewed Romanian films of all time.[1]

He played other historical figures such as Vladică Hariton in Tudor din Vladimiri and Voivode Basarab in Croitorii cei mari din Valahia. He also appeared in Răscoala and Haiducii. In 1977 he won the award for Best Actor at the 10th Moscow International Film Festival for his role in The Doom.[2]

He is buried at Bellu Cemetery.

In a 2006 poll conducted by Romanian Television to identify the "greatest Romanians of all time", Pellea came in 58th.

Selected filmography[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Top - "Nea Marin miliardar", cel mai vizionat film". jurnalul.ro. Retrieved 2013-08-29. 
  2. ^ "10th Moscow International Film Festival (1977)". MIFF. Retrieved 2013-01-13. 

External links[edit]